Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related News

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

18 June 2024

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

IAM141.org

LAS VEGAS – The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States. The three-day event, which runs until Thursday, aims to network, share ideas, and hone skills as the union enforces 14 separate contracts across eight major companies in the airline industry.

“Your diversity is your strength, but your solidarity is your power,” Machinists Legislative Director Hasan Solomon told the union members assembled. Solomon, recently named one of the Top 500 most influential people on Capitol Hill, was one of the notable speakers.

The event opened with remarks from District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm, who called the conference to order. “I want to express my deep gratitude and respect for the work our local grievance committees are doing on the front lines for our constituents,” Klemm stated. Vicky Schoening, President of Local Lodge 845 based in Las Vegas, also delivered opening remarks to the attendees representing workers at every major U.S. airport.

A key focus is the looming Section Six negotiations covering nearly 30,000 workers at United Airlines. President Klemm briefed the conference on the current state of labor in the airline industry as the union gears up for these pivotal contract talks. Other major topics included internal organizing, increasing union membership, and building solidarity.

Susie Martinez, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO, also delivered remarks.

While the agenda was jam-packed with leadership workshops and strategy sessions, the overall tone was one of determination and emphasis on union solidarity. With representatives from United, American, Hawaiian, Philippines, Spirit Airlines, SMX Cargo, and Flagship Janitorial Services in attendance, the conference allows these disparate workgroups to unite around shared goals.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related News

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

11June 2024

LAS VEGAS – The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States. The three-day event, which runs until Thursday, aims to network, share ideas, and hone skills as the union enforces 14 separate contracts across eight major companies in the airline industry.

“Your diversity is your strength, but your solidarity is your power,” Machinists Legislative Director Hasan Solomon told the union members assembled. Solomon, recently named one of the Top 500 most influential people on Capitol Hill, was one of the notable speakers.

The event opened with remarks from District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm, who called the conference to order. “I want to express my deep gratitude and respect for the work our local grievance committees are doing on the front lines for our constituents,” Klemm stated. Vicky Schoening, President of Local Lodge 845 based in Las Vegas, also delivered opening remarks to the attendees representing workers at every major U.S. airport.

A key focus is the looming Section Six negotiations covering nearly 30,000 workers at United Airlines. President Klemm briefed the conference on the current state of labor in the airline industry as the union gears up for these pivotal contract talks. Other major topics included internal organizing, increasing union membership, and building solidarity.

Susie Martinez, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO, also delivered remarks.

While the agenda was jam-packed with leadership workshops and strategy sessions, the overall tone was one of determination and emphasis on union solidarity. With representatives from United, American, Hawaiian, Philippines, Spirit Airlines, SMX Cargo, and Flagship Janitorial Services in attendance, the conference allows these disparate workgroups to unite around shared goals.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Machinists Union International President Brian Bryant Appointed to President Biden’s Export Council

Machinists Union International President Brian Bryant Appointed to President Biden’s Export Council

IAM Union International President Brian Bryant Appointed to President Biden’s Export Council

IAM Union International President Brian Bryant Appointed to President Biden’s Export Council

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON DC – Brian Bryant, International President of the 600,000-member International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM), has been appointed by President Biden to serve on the President’s Export Council. This U.S. governmental organization is the principal national advisory committee on international trade, offering a forum for private-sector business and labor leaders, members of Congress, and other administration officials to discuss and resolve trade-related issues.

Bryant, a Maine native and shipbuilder at Bath Iron Works, will represent the voices of 600,000 active and retired IAM members across the aerospace, defense, airline, manufacturing, and other industries in White House trade discussions. He also serves as Vice Chair of the AFL-CIO’s Industrial Union Council, on the Executive Committee of the IndustriALL Global Union, and on the AFL-CIO’s Executive Council.

“Our nation’s trade policies directly affect the livelihoods of our members in so many critical industries,” said Bryant. “I’m extremely thankful to President Biden for nominating me to help ensure that workers have a prominent seat in every trade discussion that affects our jobs, supply chains, and national security.”

The President’s Export Council has recently renegotiated the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). The council’s advocacy ensured that the agreement included stronger labor protections for American workers and enforcement mechanisms, leading to better working conditions and higher wages for workers in the United States, particularly in the manufacturing and automotive sectors.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) is among the largest unions in North America, representing nearly 600,000 active and retired members in manufacturing, aerospace, defense, airlines, railroad, transportation, shipbuilding, woodworking, health care, and other industries.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related News

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Machinists Union International President Brian Bryant Appointed to President Biden’s Export Council

3 June 2024

WASHINGTON DC – Brian Bryant, International President of the 600,000-member International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM), has been appointed by President Biden to serve on the President’s Export Council. This U.S. governmental organization is the principal national advisory committee on international trade, offering a forum for private-sector business and labor leaders, members of Congress, and other administration officials to discuss and resolve trade-related issues.

Bryant, a Maine native and shipbuilder at Bath Iron Works, will represent the voices of 600,000 active and retired IAM members across the aerospace, defense, airline, manufacturing, and other industries in White House trade discussions. He also serves as Vice Chair of the AFL-CIO’s Industrial Union Council, on the Executive Committee of the IndustriALL Global Union, and on the AFL-CIO’s Executive Council.

“Our nation’s trade policies directly affect the livelihoods of our members in so many critical industries,” said Bryant. “I’m extremely thankful to President Biden for nominating me to help ensure that workers have a prominent seat in every trade discussion that affects our jobs, supply chains, and national security.”

The President’s Export Council has recently renegotiated the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). The council’s advocacy ensured that the agreement included stronger labor protections for American workers and enforcement mechanisms, leading to better working conditions and higher wages for workers in the United States, particularly in the manufacturing and automotive sectors.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) is among the largest unions in North America, representing nearly 600,000 active and retired members in manufacturing, aerospace, defense, airlines, railroad, transportation, shipbuilding, woodworking, health care, and other industries.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

United Negotiations Update

United Negotiations Update

United Contract Negotiations Update

29 May 2024

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

Last week, we met with United Airlines to set logistics, protocols, and scheduling for our upcoming contract negotiations.

Our members have been clear. We are overdue for a comprehensive contract negotiation under the rules set forth under Section Six of the Railway Labor Act.

Both sides will form subcommittees to work on specific language for each Article across all seven contracts: Fleet Service, Passenger Service, Storekeepers, Maintenance Instructors, Security Officers, Central Load Planners, and Fleet Technical Instructors and Related.

We have agreed to meet one week each month to exchange proposals, starting with Article One. The first sessions are scheduled for the weeks of June 24th, July 15th, and August 12th.

Setting these ground rules is crucial for ensuring a structured and efficient negotiation process. We will provide an update after each session.

In solidarity,

Your Negotiating Committee
Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Jill Hazamy
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Terry Stansbury
Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair, 
District 141,
International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin Boards.

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their Sacrifice

IAM141.org

Dear IAM Family,

This weekend, we remember those who have given their lives for our freedoms.

For more than 136 years, IAM members have been integral parts of our communities. They have fought—and died—in every major American military mission since our founding in 1888. As a union with deep ties to our military, we will always remember, mourn, and honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

That’s why we provide best-in-class services to our military veterans, built an IAM monument to honor our military, and are incredibly proud that IAM members serve the interests of our armed forces each and every day.

This Memorial Day – and every day – we remember those who have given their lives for all of us.

Sincerely,

Brian Bryant
International President

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Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Honoring Their Sacrifice

26 May 2024

Dear IAM Family,

This weekend, we remember those who have given their lives for our freedoms.

For more than 136 years, IAM members have been integral parts of our communities. They have fought—and died—in every major American military mission since our founding in 1888. As a union with deep ties to our military, we will always remember, mourn, and honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

That’s why we provide best-in-class services to our military veterans, built an IAM monument to honor our military, and are incredibly proud that IAM members serve the interests of our armed forces each and every day.

This Memorial Day – and every day – we remember those who have given their lives for all of us.

Sincerely,

Brian Bryant
International President

Related

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

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Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

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Machinists Union Applauds the Passage of the FAA Reauthorization Bill

Machinists Union Applauds the Passage of the FAA Reauthorization Bill

Machinists Union Applauds the Passage of the FAA Reauthorization Bill

Machinists Union Applauds the Passage of the FAA Reauthorization Bill

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON — The Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act, H.R. 3935, reauthorizes the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) through 2028. This comprehensive bill, led by Representative Sam Graves (R-MO), covers airport planning, development, facilities, equipment, and operations. Key provisions include increasing air traffic controller hiring targets, creating a workforce development program for aviation professionals, and enhancing protections for airline workers. The bill has attracted widespread bipartisan support, reflecting its critical importance to the aviation industry.

IAM International President Brian Bryant emphasized the bill’s importance, stating, “While the bill, H.R. 3935, does not address all the IAM’s demands in an FAA reauthorization package, it does include several of our requested provisions and will ultimately help improve the safety and working conditions of our air transport members.”

The bill addresses a wide range of issues crucial to the aviation industry. It directs the FAA to hire and train more air traffic controllers to fill the current gap of 3,000 vacancies. It also mandates increased access to training simulators across air traffic control towers nationwide. To enhance runway safety, the bill requires the installation of additional runway technology at medium and large hub airports.

Passenger protections are also a significant focus of the legislation. The bill mandates that the Department of Transportation (DOT) establish standards to ensure the aircraft boarding and deplaning process is accessible for individuals with disabilities, including those who use wheelchairs. Additionally, airlines are required to seat young children next to an accompanying adult without charging extra fees if adjacent seats are available.

The bill further enhances protections for airline workers by expanding legal protections to ground-based employees, such as gate and check-in agents, and improving self-defense training for flight attendants. Bryant noted, “This legislation offers some positive means to ensure the safety and well-being of workers and passengers. For instance, we’ve witnessed the increase in passenger attacks towards aviation workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve also witnessed the string of tragic accidents and fatalities of ramp workers like in April 2023 when an American Airlines’ ramp worker died while working on the tarmac at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Austin, Texas. Policy changes are needed and this FAA reauthorization legislation, while not perfect, offers many much-needed positive changes for passenger and worker safety and helps transform this vital industry into the future.”

It also includes provisions for increasing cockpit voice recording to 25 hours, enhancing oversight of aircraft production, and ensuring automatic cash refunds for canceled or substantially delayed flights.

The bill also provides for the establishment of an FAA Ombudsman to coordinate responses to issues related to aircraft certifications, pilot certificates, and operational approvals. The legislation also mandates a peer review of current aviation whistleblower protections and requires the FAA to work directly with the Department of Labor on whistleblower cases.

Now that the bill has passed in the House, it will head to President Joe Biden for his signature. Once signed into law, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act will provide the necessary framework and funding to ensure the continued safety and efficiency of the U.S. aviation industry through 2028.

Overall, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act aims to improve aviation safety, enhance protections for passengers and airline workers, and invest in airport and air travel infrastructure nationwide.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related News

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Machinists Union Applauds the Passage of the FAA Reauthorization Bill

16 May 2024

WASHINGTON — The Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act, H.R. 3935, reauthorizes the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) through 2028. This comprehensive bill, led by Representative Sam Graves (R-MO), covers airport planning, development, facilities, equipment, and operations. Key provisions include increasing air traffic controller hiring targets, creating a workforce development program for aviation professionals, and enhancing protections for airline workers. The bill has attracted widespread bipartisan support, reflecting its critical importance to the aviation industry.

IAM International President Brian Bryant emphasized the bill’s importance, stating, “While the bill, H.R. 3935, does not address all the IAM’s demands in an FAA reauthorization package, it does include several of our requested provisions and will ultimately help improve the safety and working conditions of our air transport members.”

The bill addresses a wide range of issues crucial to the aviation industry. It directs the FAA to hire and train more air traffic controllers to fill the current gap of 3,000 vacancies. It also mandates increased access to training simulators across air traffic control towers nationwide. To enhance runway safety, the bill requires the installation of additional runway technology at medium and large hub airports.

Passenger protections are also a significant focus of the legislation. The bill mandates that the Department of Transportation (DOT) establish standards to ensure the aircraft boarding and deplaning process is accessible for individuals with disabilities, including those who use wheelchairs. Additionally, airlines are required to seat young children next to an accompanying adult without charging extra fees if adjacent seats are available.

The bill further enhances protections for airline workers by expanding legal protections to ground-based employees, such as gate and check-in agents, and improving self-defense training for flight attendants. Bryant noted, “This legislation offers some positive means to ensure the safety and well-being of workers and passengers. For instance, we’ve witnessed the increase in passenger attacks towards aviation workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve also witnessed the string of tragic accidents and fatalities of ramp workers like in April 2023 when an American Airlines’ ramp worker died while working on the tarmac at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Austin, Texas. Policy changes are needed and this FAA reauthorization legislation, while not perfect, offers many much-needed positive changes for passenger and worker safety and helps transform this vital industry into the future.”

It also includes provisions for increasing cockpit voice recording to 25 hours, enhancing oversight of aircraft production, and ensuring automatic cash refunds for canceled or substantially delayed flights.

The bill also provides for the establishment of an FAA Ombudsman to coordinate responses to issues related to aircraft certifications, pilot certificates, and operational approvals. The legislation also mandates a peer review of current aviation whistleblower protections and requires the FAA to work directly with the Department of Labor on whistleblower cases.

Now that the bill has passed in the House, it will head to President Joe Biden for his signature. Once signed into law, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act will provide the necessary framework and funding to ensure the continued safety and efficiency of the U.S. aviation industry through 2028.

Overall, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act aims to improve aviation safety, enhance protections for passengers and airline workers, and invest in airport and air travel infrastructure nationwide.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...