American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

IAM141.org

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

3 April 2024

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

 

Related

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:

We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members at American. 

This survey will begin immediately and run through April 19. 

The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines. We strongly urge you to take the survey as soon as possible to ensure your voice is heard loud and clear. By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations.

You can take the survey right now using the link below. 

Most members will complete this comprehensive survey within about ten minutes. Your negotiators will carefully study each entry and carry your priorities into the upcoming negotiations. 

Again, your voice is critical to this process. Thank you for your dedication and participation.

In Solidarity,

 

 Greg Cosey
International Representative
Transport Workers Union

 

 TWU Negotiators
Jennifer Platt
Kevin Sullivan
Tim Hughes
Juan Elvira
Brian Oyer
Mike Szwed

 

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair,
District 141
International Association of  Machinists and Aerospace Workers

 

IAM Negotiators
Mark Baskett
Pat Rezler
William Wilson
Rodney Walker
Todd Peck
Mark Romonowski

Please Print and Post on all Union Bulletin Boards

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:

We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members at American. 

This survey will begin immediately and run through April 19. 

The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines. We strongly urge you to take the survey as soon as possible to ensure your voice is heard loud and clear. By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations.

You can take the survey right now using the link below. 

Most members will complete this comprehensive survey within about ten minutes. Your negotiators will carefully study each entry and carry your priorities into the upcoming negotiations. 

Again, your voice is critical to this process. Thank you for your dedication and participation.

In Solidarity,

 

 Greg Cosey
International Representative
Transport Workers Union

 

 TWU Negotiators
Jennifer Platt
Kevin Sullivan
Tim Hughes
Juan Elvira
Brian Oyer
Mike Szwed

 

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair,
District 141
International Association of  Machinists and Aerospace Workers

 

IAM Negotiators
Mark Baskett
Pat Rezler
William Wilson
Rodney Walker
Todd Peck
Mark Romonowski

Please Print and Post on all Union Bulletin Boards

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

IAM141.org

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

16 November 2023

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

Related

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

IAM141.org

On Wednesday, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA) announced that American Airlines’ flight attendants have voted in favor of going on strike if the company doesn’t agree to fair contract terms.

According to the APFA, which represents over 26,000 flight attendants at the airline, a staggering 99.47% of the flight attendants have voted to approve a strike.

“Today, we sent a clear message to American Airlines management,” said APFA National President Julie Hedrick. “We are fired up and ready for a contract. They ignore this strike vote at their peril,” she continued. “Our contributions to the success of American Airlines must be recognized and respected.”

The Union is asking to be paid for time spent on the job. Currently, American only pays the Union for the time they spend in the air; the time spent working while on the ground is unpaid. This is done at other airlines, such as Delta, which pays flight crews “boarding pay.”

APFA is also asking for scheduling improvements and better work / life balance.

The vote doesn’t necessarily indicate that a strike is on the immediate horizon. U.S. federal legislation sets high barriers for airline unions to legally go on strike. A federal mediator must declare that continued talks would be futile, a determination that is seldom made. Additionally, intervention from the President or Congress could further postpone or prevent a strike.

Should federal mediation fail to convince the company to offer the Union a fair agreement, the APFA has the option to enter a 30-day cooling-off period. After this period, the flight attendants would be permitted to initiate a strike.

Amid a strong labor market backdrop and growing public support for unions, unionized workers such as pilots, airline workers, and delivery drivers are experiencing increased leverage in negotiations.

Next week, a coalition of labor unions at United Airlines will hold a historic summit at the Machinists Union District Headquarters in Chicago. The meeting will include representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Last week, American Airlines’ pilots ratified a new four-year contract featuring over $9.6 billion in total pay and benefits increases. This move is part of the airline’s competitive strategy against industry rivals like United Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

On August 9, following two years of talks, Transport Workers Union Local 555, the Union representing 19,000 Southwest employees in areas like ramp operations, provisioning, and freight, finalized an agreement with the Dallas-based airline. Pending approval from union members, the new contract would include increased wages and 12 weeks of parental leave, among other benefits. Union members are scheduled to vote on the agreement from September 8 to September 20.

Notably, the pay increases at Southwest are the same as those negotiated on behalf of thousands of Machinists Union at United. The new agreement would grant top-of-scale pay for ground workers of $36.72.

As travel demand remains robust, airlines are scrambling to increase staffing. This urgency has empowered workers to negotiate for better pay and improved work conditions.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

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Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the Machinists Union

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

August 31, 2023

On Wednesday, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA) announced that American Airlines’ flight attendants have voted in favor of going on strike if the company doesn’t agree to fair contract terms.

According to the APFA, which represents over 26,000 flight attendants at the airline, a staggering 99.47% of the flight attendants have voted to approve a strike.

“Today, we sent a clear message to American Airlines management,” said APFA National President Julie Hedrick. “We are fired up and ready for a contract. They ignore this strike vote at their peril,” she continued. “Our contributions to the success of American Airlines must be recognized and respected.”

The Union is asking to be paid for time spent on the job. Currently, American only pays the Union for the time they spend in the air; the time spent working while on the ground is unpaid. This is done at other airlines, such as Delta, which pays flight crews “boarding pay.”

APFA is also asking for scheduling improvements and better work / life balance.

The vote doesn’t necessarily indicate that a strike is on the immediate horizon. U.S. federal legislation sets high barriers for airline unions to legally go on strike. A federal mediator must declare that continued talks would be futile, a determination that is seldom made. Additionally, intervention from the President or Congress could further postpone or prevent a strike.

Should federal mediation fail to convince the company to offer the Union a fair agreement, the APFA has the option to enter a 30-day cooling-off period. After this period, the flight attendants would be permitted to initiate a strike.

Amid a strong labor market backdrop and growing public support for unions, unionized workers such as pilots, airline workers, and delivery drivers are experiencing increased leverage in negotiations.

Next week, a coalition of labor unions at United Airlines will hold a historic summit at the Machinists Union District Headquarters in Chicago. The meeting will include representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Last week, American Airlines’ pilots ratified a new four-year contract featuring over $9.6 billion in total pay and benefits increases. This move is part of the airline’s competitive strategy against industry rivals like United Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

On August 9, following two years of talks, Transport Workers Union Local 555, the Union representing 19,000 Southwest employees in areas like ramp operations, provisioning, and freight, finalized an agreement with the Dallas-based airline. Pending approval from union members, the new contract would include increased wages and 12 weeks of parental leave, among other benefits. Union members are scheduled to vote on the agreement from September 8 to September 20.

Notably, the pay increases at Southwest are the same as those negotiated on behalf of thousands of Machinists Union at United. The new agreement would grant top-of-scale pay for ground workers of $36.72.

As travel demand remains robust, airlines are scrambling to increase staffing. This urgency has empowered workers to negotiate for better pay and improved work conditions.

 

Related

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

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More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

“The Full Story Behind the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident”

IAM141.org

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

 

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

 

Your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has your back.

Navigating life’s challenges, from mental health struggles to substance abuse, becomes easier with our dedicated EAP. As valued union members, you’re entitled to free, confidential, and compassionate support. Beyond personal care, we help demystify insurance and company policies, ensuring you access the best care possible. Remember, your well-being is our priority. Reach out to EAP whenever you need; we’re here to guide and stand by you.

Help can start today: CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the Machinists Union

More Info About the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

August 8, 2023

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

Your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has your back.

Navigating life’s challenges, from mental health struggles to substance abuse, becomes easier with our dedicated EAP. As valued union members, you’re entitled to free, confidential, and compassionate support. Beyond personal care, an EAP Representative can help demystify insurance and company policies, ensuring you access the best care possible. Remember, your well-being is our priority. Reach out to EAP whenever you need; we’re here to guide and stand by you.

Help can start today: CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Related

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation SurveysUnion members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Association Update: Attendance Policy and Holiday Pay Arbitrations

Recording Secretaries – Please print and post on all IAMAW Bulletin Boards. GET PRINTABLE COPY >>

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Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

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To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members...

Association Update: Attendance Policy and Holiday Pay Arbitrations

August 1, 2023

The Association is pleased to report to the membership we have received long-awaited awards for both the Attendance Policy and Holiday Pay Arbitrations. Grievances were filed against American Airlines, Inc. and its interpretation of collective bargaining agreements covering Association members in M & R, MCT, MLS, MTS, and Fleet Service.

In both cases, arbitrators concurred with the Association and ruled American was in violation of the agreements. In regard to the Attendance Policy award, the arbitrator ruled that many of the guidelines of the policy must be rewritten and must align with what was discussed and understood in negotiations.

The arbitrator stated that AA did not use discretion when imposing discipline nor did it allow for extenuating circumstances for absences. The award also stated that there was no consistency in the application of the policy or in the assessment of points and that the company excessively penalized employees for using “bona fide” sick time.

The arbitrator also concluded that the part of the policy regarding the “critical operations period,” was in violation as well. The award in the Holiday Pay arbitration was even more complete. The arbitrator ruled that American violated Article 22 of all agreements and must pay employees Holiday pay while on unpaid FMLA, OJI (On-the- job injuries), and military leave.

The Association thanks the law firm of Phillips Richard and Rind, PA., for its dedicated efforts in helping secure these victories for our members. Overall, this is a solid win for the members of the Association. We are committed to fighting for our members and preserving the intent and meaning of the language in our agreements. In Solidarity, 

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.