Study: More Workers Demand Employers Pay at Least $76k

Study: More Workers Demand Employers Pay at Least $76k

Study: More Workers Demand Employers Pay

at Least $76k to Start New Job

IAM141.org

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has released the results of a survey that analyzed the experiences of individuals during their job search. The survey had a sample size of over 1,000 respondents and was conducted from October 2020 to March 2021. 

Over the last four months, the average full-time wage that people were offered has gone up to $62,088 from $59,834 in November 2022. However, people are less satisfied with the amount of money they’re getting paid, the non-wage benefits they receive, and their chances of being promoted at their current jobs. 

The average “reservation wage,” which is the lowest salary that people would accept for a new job, has reached a record high of $75,811. This increase is mainly because older people over the age of 45 and those who have attended college are asking for more money.

If people are expecting to get a job offer, the average expected yearly salary has decreased to $58,710 from $61,187 in November 2022. This means people are expecting less money than before. For those who are already employed, the chance of them finding a new employer in the next four months has increased to 12.5%, while the likelihood of them becoming unemployed has risen to 2.5%. Men and people who did not attend college are primarily responsible for the increase in unemployment expectations.

The results show that the time needed to find a job and perceived job availability varies significantly across different demographic groups and income levels.

Individuals with a high school degree or less are taking longer to find a new job than those with a college degree or higher. 

Individuals with a high school degree or less typically needed ten weeks to find a new job, compared to 6 weeks for those with a college degree or higher. Higher levels of education may lead to greater job opportunities and a quicker job search.

The survey also found that women reported longer job search durations than men, with a median duration of 8 weeks for women compared to 6 weeks for men. 

Additionally, job search duration was even longer for Black and Hispanic respondents compared to white respondents. Black and Hispanic job seekers had a median of 9 weeks and eight weeks, respectively, to find a job. By comparison, white respondents only needed 6 weeks.

Another interesting finding of the survey is that people with higher incomes tended to think there were more job openings than those who earned less. 

People with an annual household income of less than $50,000 were less likely to think there were good job opportunities available. Only 31% of these people reported that job availability was good or very good. In contrast, people who made $100,000 or more annually were more likely to think there were good job opportunities available. 59% of these people reported that job availability was good or very good. These findings suggest that income inequality may be a factor in how people view job availability.

The survey also asked respondents about their wage expectations when starting a new job. On average, respondents expected a wage of $20.80 per hour. However, wage expectations varied across different demographic groups and income levels. 

Women expected to be paid less than men, with an expected wage of $19.20 per hour compared to $22.30 per hour for men. 

Additionally, individuals with a high school degree or less expected a lower wage than those with a college degree or higher, with an expected wage of $16.80 per hour compared to $23.20 per hour for those with a college degree or higher. These findings suggest that certain demographic groups and education levels may face wage disparities when starting a new job.

The survey results highlight the importance of understanding the experiences of individuals during their job search. The findings suggest that certain demographic groups and income levels may face additional barriers to employment and may have different perceptions of job availability and wage expectations. This information can be used to inform policies that aim to address income inequality and reduce barriers to employment.

To address the longer job search durations experienced by individuals with a high school degree or less, policymakers may consider investing in education and training programs to provide these individuals with the skills needed to compete in the job market. Additionally, policies that aim to reduce discrimination based on gender and race may help to reduce the disparities in job search duration and wage expectations experienced by specific demographic groups.

Legislation could also include increasing the minimum wage or providing tax credits to low-income individuals to help them make ends meet.

Read the Report Here >>

 

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Study: More Workers Demand Employers Pay at Least $76k to Start New Job

April 20, 2023

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has released the results of a survey that analyzed the experiences of individuals during their job search. The survey had a sample size of over 1,000 respondents and was conducted from October 2020 to March 2021. 

Over the last four months, the average full-time wage that people were offered has gone up to $62,088 from $59,834 in November 2022. However, people are less satisfied with the amount of money they’re getting paid, the non-wage benefits they receive, and their chances of being promoted at their current jobs. 

The average “reservation wage,” which is the lowest salary that people would accept for a new job, has reached a record high of $75,811. This increase is mainly because older people over the age of 45 and those who have attended college are asking for more money.

If people are expecting to get a job offer, the average expected yearly salary has decreased to $58,710 from $61,187 in November 2022. This means people are expecting less money than before. For those who are already employed, the chance of them finding a new employer in the next four months has increased to 12.5%, while the likelihood of them becoming unemployed has risen to 2.5%. Men and people who did not attend college are primarily responsible for the increase in unemployment expectations.

The results show that the time needed to find a job and perceived job availability varies significantly across different demographic groups and income levels.

Individuals with a high school degree or less are taking longer to find a new job than those with a college degree or higher. 

Individuals with a high school degree or less typically needed ten weeks to find a new job, compared to 6 weeks for those with a college degree or higher. Higher levels of education may lead to greater job opportunities and a quicker job search.

The survey also found that women reported longer job search durations than men, with a median duration of 8 weeks for women compared to 6 weeks for men. 

Additionally, job search duration was even longer for Black and Hispanic respondents compared to white respondents. Black and Hispanic job seekers had a median of 9 weeks and eight weeks, respectively, to find a job. By comparison, white respondents only needed 6 weeks.

Another interesting finding of the survey is that people with higher incomes tended to think there were more job openings than those who earned less. 

People with an annual household income of less than $50,000 were less likely to think there were good job opportunities available. Only 31% of these people reported that job availability was good or very good. In contrast, people who made $100,000 or more annually were more likely to think there were good job opportunities available. 59% of these people reported that job availability was good or very good. These findings suggest that income inequality may be a factor in how people view job availability.

The survey also asked respondents about their wage expectations when starting a new job. On average, respondents expected a wage of $20.80 per hour. However, wage expectations varied across different demographic groups and income levels. 

Women expected to be paid less than men, with an expected wage of $19.20 per hour compared to $22.30 per hour for men. 

Additionally, individuals with a high school degree or less expected a lower wage than those with a college degree or higher, with an expected wage of $16.80 per hour compared to $23.20 per hour for those with a college degree or higher. These findings suggest that certain demographic groups and education levels may face wage disparities when starting a new job.

The survey results highlight the importance of understanding the experiences of individuals during their job search. The findings suggest that certain demographic groups and income levels may face additional barriers to employment and may have different perceptions of job availability and wage expectations. This information can be used to inform policies that aim to address income inequality and reduce barriers to employment.

To address the longer job search durations experienced by individuals with a high school degree or less, policymakers may consider investing in education and training programs to provide these individuals with the skills needed to compete in the job market. Additionally, policies that aim to reduce discrimination based on gender and race may help to reduce the disparities in job search duration and wage expectations experienced by specific demographic groups.

Legislation could also include increasing the minimum wage or providing tax credits to low-income individuals to help them make ends meet.

Read the Report Here >>

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Scholarship Contest is Now Underway!

Scholarship Contest is Now Underway!

The Scholarship Contest is Underway!

IAM141.org

Calling all high school seniors and college and trade school students! Prepare to prove your worth in the arena of the written word by taking part in the 2023 essay competition. This year’s theme is “The rise of public approval of labor unions in the United States.”

In a mere 700 to 1000 words, you can champion the cause of the working class and earn a wealth of funds for your future education. Prizes will be awarded to six exceptional participants, starting at $1,000. The ultimate victor will receive a grand prize of $2,000.

The Essay Competition launched on March 1, 2023, and ends at midnight on July 15, 2023. Winners will be announced on or around August. 1, 2023. Judging will be done by an impartial Scholarship Committee that is not a member of District Lodge 141. Essays must be submitted via email.

Furthermore, the winners of the essay competition will be honored by District 141 of the Machinists and Aerospace Union, where they will be recognized for their exceptional writing skills and commitment to social justice. Additionally, the top entries will be included in our District Journal, which records key events within our District for future generations to see.

So sharpen your quills and unleash your creativity! Submit your entries by the deadline of midnight, July 15, 2023, and join the ranks of the finest writers in District 141. May the odds be ever in your favor!

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Thousands of Dollars in Scholarship Money Will Be Awarded

February 27, 2023

Calling all high school seniors and college and trade school students! Prepare to prove your worth in the arena of the written word by taking part in the 2023 essay competition. This year’s theme is “The rise of public approval of labor unions in the United States.”

In a mere 700 to 1000 words, you can champion the cause of the working class and earn a wealth of funds for your future education. Prizes will be awarded to six exceptional participants, starting at $1,000. The ultimate victor will receive a grand prize of $2,000.

The Essay Competition shall commence on March 1, 2023, and end at midnight on July 15, 2023. Winners will be announced on or around August. 1, 2023. Judging will be done by an impartial Scholarship Committee that is not a member of District Lodge 141.

Furthermore, the winners of the essay competition will be honored by District 141 of the Machinists and Aerospace Union, where they will be recognized for their exceptional writing skills and commitment to social justice. Additionally, the top entries will be included in our District Journal, which records key events within our District for future generations to see.

So sharpen your quills and unleash your creativity! Submit your entries by the deadline of midnight, July 15, 2023, and join the ranks of the finest writers in District 141. May the odds be ever in your favor!

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Iowa Lawmakers Seek to Bring Child Labor Back to the US

Iowa Lawmakers Seek to Bring Child Labor Back to the US

Iowa Lawmakers Seek to Bring Child Labor Back to the US

IAM141.org

In February, labor advocates expressed their opposition to a proposed bill in Iowa that state lawmakers have introduced with support from businesses. The bill aims to relax child labor laws, allowing teenagers as young as 14 to work in jobs currently considered unsafe for children, such as mining, logging, and slaughterhouses. The proposal will also allow young teens to work in adult nightclubs serving alcohol and would allow companies to keep them on the clock until 9:00 on school nights. One union president deemed the proposal dangerous and characterized it as “just crazy.” 

Horrifyingly, if a teenager is injured or dies while working under a “work-based learning program,” the business involved would be shielded from legal action brought by parents, even if the harm resulted directly from the employer’s negligence.

The proposed bill, Senate File 167, introduced by Senator Jason Schultz (R-Schleswig) in January, would expand the types of work available to 14 and 15-year-olds in the state. The legislation would allow teenagers as young as 14 to work jobs currently off-limits for safety reasons. The new rules would avoid many legal restrictions by recategorizing some child labor as “Work-Based Learning Programs” tied to a child’s regular school curriculum. 

Most worryingly, the bill also shields businesses from lawsuits from parents if their children are hurt or killed on the job. Under Iowa law, young teenagers can sometimes be exempted from specific safety provisions, including those related to hazardous work, if they participate in a work-based learning program. 

However, according to the Des Moines Register, the proposed legislation includes “an entirely new section” which would grant authority to the heads of the Iowa Workforce Development and the state Department of Education to make exceptions for teenagers aged 14-17 who are “participating in work-based learning or a school or employer-administered, work-related program.”

However, if an exception is granted, the teenagers would lose their worker compensation rights, leaving them solely responsible for any incidents that may occur while working. Employers are protected from lawsuits even if they are determined to be accountable for the injury due to negligence and even if the injured or killed child did nothing wrong.

In other words, Iowa employers can skirt child labor laws by expanding existing student-worker programs with help from complacent school districts. The new law will allow these programs to expand to cover jobs such as working in meatpacking plants, freezers, mechanical detasseling, and working with industrial loading equipment. 

However, these programs often strip the students of workers’ compensation rights. So, if a student employed under such a program is hurt, disabled, or killed, the business cannot face civil penalties. 

The bill states, “A business that accepts a secondary student in a work-based learning program shall not be subject to civil liability for any claim for bodily injury to the student or sickness or death by accident of the student arising from the business’s negligent act or omission during the student’s participation in the work-based learning program at the business or work site.” (Emphasis added.)

The bill was first introduced to the Iowa Legislature on January 30. An Iowa State Senate Subcommittee advanced and recommended passage of the bill on February 9, but it has yet to get final approval from Senators. 

Generally, individuals under 18 would still be prohibited from working in specific fields, such as deep mining, logging, demolition, and slaughtering animals. 

However, a business that requests and gets a waiver under a “Work-Based Learning” program could require children to perform almost any type of work.

The bill is being proposed to address an ongoing labor shortage in Iowa. It has gained the support of area businesses looking to increase staffing without paying more wages.

In the words of Charlie Wishman, the president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, quoted in the Des Moines Register, the proposed bill is “just crazy” and represents an ill-advised attempt by businesses to address Iowa’s need for more workers. He expressed concern that even with the label of a “work-based learning program,” young workers are still at risk of serious injury, stating, “A kid can still lose an arm in a work-based learning program.”

In a separate interview with Newsweek, Wishman addressed supporters of the bill, who argue that kids need work experiences more than childhood experiences, saying, “For us, this bill overall undermines the basic recognition that child labor should be limited and safe. Let kids be kids—there are plenty of job opportunities right now for kids to gain experience and learn responsibility without putting them in danger or compromising their academic success.”

As for the argument that paying more wages to attract more workers is bad business, he said, “Here are answers to this state’s workforce problems, and it’s not hiring children to do adult jobs. It’s better pay, benefits, and working conditions for adults that can make Iowa an attractive place to live and work.”

It will also ease the requirements for children to obtain driver’s licenses to allow them to drive themselves to their new jobs and expand the hours children can be required to come to work and how late they can be made to remain on the job. The new rules could force children to drive to and from work as late as 11:00 at night. 

In response to concerns that inexperienced kids on the roads might create a hazard, the legislation also prohibits lawsuits against employers when children experience car crashes on the way to and from work.

Supporters of the bill say that child labor laws are ineffective anyway, and ending them can mean more money for businesses. Speaking for the Iowa Restaurant Association, Jessica Dunker told the political outlet Iowa Starting Line that adult nightclubs and bars needed children to work much later than current law allows. The new bill would enable establishments to keep kids on their shifts until 9:00 p.m. on school nights to serve alcohol to customers during peak hours. Dunker said that the restaurants in her association largely ignore child labor laws already, saying, “Nine o’clock? I’m sure they’re doing something already,” she said of requiring 14-year-old children to stay at work on school nights.

Data front the US Department of Labor backs up her assessment that many Iowa businesses illegally use child labor.

In 2022, the DOL sought charges involving more than 3,000 children who were victims of workplace exploitation, prompting nearly $3.4 million in fines. 

Investigations were also launched where young teens were killed on the job. Among them is the tragic case of a 16-year-old killed on a hotel construction site after falling about 11 stories after trying to jump from a roof onto a powered lift. 

 U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation into the incident found the teenager’s employer, Stover and Sons Contractors Inc. – a Madison construction contractor – violated two hazardous occupation orders of the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The orders ban employers from allowing minors under 18 to perform roofing activities or to operate or ride on a power-driven hoisting apparatus. Further investigation determined the employer also violated child labor laws when it allowed the boy to work more than 8 hours a day and more than 40 hours per week when he was 15.

The Iowa law would legalize child labor on construction sites.

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Iowa Lawmakers Seek to Bring Child Labor Back to the US

February 23, 2023

In February, labor advocates expressed their opposition to a proposed bill in Iowa that state lawmakers have introduced with support from businesses. The bill aims to relax child labor laws, allowing teenagers as young as 14 to work in jobs currently considered unsafe for children, such as mining, logging, and slaughterhouses. The proposal will also allow young teens to work in adult nightclubs serving alcohol and would allow companies to keep them on the clock until 9:00 on school nights. One union president deemed the proposal dangerous and characterized it as “just crazy.” 

Horrifyingly, if a teenager is injured or dies while working under a “work-based learning program,” the business involved would be shielded from legal action brought by parents, even if the harm resulted directly from the employer’s negligence.

The proposed bill, Senate File 167, introduced by Senator Jason Schultz (R-Schleswig) in January, would expand the types of work available to 14 and 15-year-olds in the state. The legislation would allow teenagers as young as 14 to work jobs currently off-limits for safety reasons. The new rules would avoid many legal restrictions by recategorizing some child labor as “Work-Based Learning Programs” tied to a child’s regular school curriculum. 

Most worryingly, the bill also shields businesses from lawsuits from parents if their children are hurt or killed on the job. Under Iowa law, young teenagers can sometimes be exempted from specific safety provisions, including those related to hazardous work, if they participate in a work-based learning program. 

However, according to the Des Moines Register, the proposed legislation includes “an entirely new section” which would grant authority to the heads of the Iowa Workforce Development and the state Department of Education to make exceptions for teenagers aged 14-17 who are “participating in work-based learning or a school or employer-administered, work-related program.”

However, if an exception is granted, the teenagers would lose their worker compensation rights, leaving them solely responsible for any incidents that may occur while working. Employers are protected from lawsuits even if they are determined to be accountable for the injury due to negligence and even if the injured or killed child did nothing wrong.

In other words, Iowa employers can skirt child labor laws by expanding existing student-worker programs with help from complacent school districts. The new law will allow these programs to expand to cover jobs such as working in meatpacking plants, freezers, mechanical detasseling, and working with industrial loading equipment. 

However, these programs often strip the students of workers’ compensation rights. So, if a student employed under such a program is hurt, disabled, or killed, the business cannot face civil penalties. 

The bill states, “A business that accepts a secondary student in a work-based learning program shall not be subject to civil liability for any claim for bodily injury to the student or sickness or death by accident of the student arising from the business’s negligent act or omission during the student’s participation in the work-based learning program at the business or work site.” (Emphasis added.)

The bill was first introduced to the Iowa Legislature on January 30. An Iowa State Senate Subcommittee advanced and recommended passage of the bill on February 9, but it has yet to get final approval from Senators. 

Generally, individuals under 18 would still be prohibited from working in specific fields, such as deep mining, logging, demolition, and slaughtering animals. 

However, a business that requests and gets a waiver under a “Work-Based Learning” program could require children to perform almost any type of work.

The bill is being proposed to address an ongoing labor shortage in Iowa. It has gained the support of area businesses looking to increase staffing without paying more wages.

In the words of Charlie Wishman, the president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, quoted in the Des Moines Register, the proposed bill is “just crazy” and represents an ill-advised attempt by businesses to address Iowa’s need for more workers. He expressed concern that even with the label of a “work-based learning program,” young workers are still at risk of serious injury, stating, “A kid can still lose an arm in a work-based learning program.”

In a separate interview with Newsweek, Wishman addressed supporters of the bill, who argue that kids need work experiences more than childhood experiences, saying, “For us, this bill overall undermines the basic recognition that child labor should be limited and safe. Let kids be kids—there are plenty of job opportunities right now for kids to gain experience and learn responsibility without putting them in danger or compromising their academic success.”

As for the argument that paying more wages to attract more workers is bad business, he said, “Here are answers to this state’s workforce problems, and it’s not hiring children to do adult jobs. It’s better pay, benefits, and working conditions for adults that can make Iowa an attractive place to live and work.”

It will also ease the requirements for children to obtain driver’s licenses to allow them to drive themselves to their new jobs and expand the hours children can be required to come to work and how late they can be made to remain on the job. The new rules could force children to drive to and from work as late as 11:00 at night. 

In response to concerns that inexperienced kids on the roads might create a hazard, the legislation also prohibits lawsuits against employers when children experience car crashes on the way to and from work.

Supporters of the bill say that child labor laws are ineffective anyway, and ending them can mean more money for businesses. Speaking for the Iowa Restaurant Association, Jessica Dunker told the political outlet Iowa Starting Line that adult nightclubs and bars needed children to work much later than current law allows. The new bill would enable establishments to keep kids on their shifts until 9:00 p.m. on school nights to serve alcohol to customers during peak hours. Dunker said that the restaurants in her association largely ignore child labor laws already, saying, “Nine o’clock? I’m sure they’re doing something already,” she said of requiring 14-year-old children to stay at work on school nights.

Data front the US Department of Labor backs up her assessment that many Iowa businesses illegally use child labor.

In 2022, the DOL sought charges involving more than 3,000 children who were victims of workplace exploitation, prompting nearly $3.4 million in fines. 

Investigations were also launched where young teens were killed on the job. Among them is the tragic case of a 16-year-old killed on a hotel construction site after falling about 11 stories after trying to jump from a roof onto a powered lift. 

 U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation into the incident found the teenager’s employer, Stover and Sons Contractors Inc. – a Madison construction contractor – violated two hazardous occupation orders of the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The orders ban employers from allowing minors under 18 to perform roofing activities or to operate or ride on a power-driven hoisting apparatus. Further investigation determined the employer also violated child labor laws when it allowed the boy to work more than 8 hours a day and more than 40 hours per week when he was 15.

The Iowa law would legalize child labor on construction sites.

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Do Airline Contracts Expire?

Do Airline Contracts Expire?

Do Airline Contracts Expire?

IAM141.org

You’ve probably heard of the Railway Labor Act if you work at an airline or are a frequent air traveler. This federal law, enacted in 1926, established a framework for labor-management relations in the railroad and airline industries. One of the Railway Labor Act’s most significant features is how it governs airline labor contracts.

Compared to most labor contracts with an expiration date set in stone, union contracts at airlines never truly expire. Instead, they become amendable after a particular date. This means that even if a union contract has passed its amendable date, it remains in effect until a new agreement is reached. Another way to think of it is to consider a union contract at an airline or railroad as “updatable” after a specified date instead of “expired.”

This unique feature of airline labor contracts results from the Railway Labor Act’s goal of promoting stability and avoiding disruptive labor disputes in industries essential to the national economy. Under the Act, airlines and their unions must engage in bargaining and mediation procedures before any work stoppages or strikes occur. This is intended to provide a safety net against any disruption to air travel that could have far-reaching consequences.

Many union contracts governed by the Railway Labor Act have amendable dates about three years after they are signed. Once the amendable date has passed and the agreement can be updated, both sides have a 30-day window to request to open negotiations. The contract will renew if the parties do not request talks during this time.

It’s important to note that the amendable date is one of many opportunities for airlines and their unions to change their labor agreements. Both sides can agree to negotiate outside of this window, and many airlines and unions do so regularly to address changes in the industry and other factors.

The Railway Labor Act’s framework for airline labor contracts has helped to promote stability and avoid disruptions in air travel for almost a century. While negotiating new agreements can be lengthy and complex, it has also led to a relatively stable labor environment in an industry essential to the nation’s economy.

The Railway Labor Act got its name because it was first drafted to prevent powerful rail unions from paralyzing national transportation, which relied heavily on railroads at the time. Airlines were added to the Act once they began to rival rail as a critical method of travel and shipping.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) has been negotiating with United Airlines for months over new labor contracts covering thousands of employees. The two sides have made some progress, but one sticking point has yet to be resolved: job security and status protections for workers.

According to the Machinists Union, these protections are critical for ensuring United employees have a stable and secure work environment. The union has proposed specific language that would provide significant job security and protections for customer service and ramp workers, stores, trainers, and load planners at the airline. However, United has yet to include these provisions in any updated contract, leading to an increasingly tense negotiation stalemate.

By putting profits ahead of its workers and failing to provide the job security and protections necessary in today’s airline industry, United is positioning itself at a competitive disadvantage. Staffing issues continue to plague the airline industry as carriers seek to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. While most air travel was grounded in 2020, United offered lucrative payouts to entice as many people as possible to retire as soon as possible. The policy allowed United to pocket millions in unspent wage support payments the airline collected from taxpayers.

United, for its part, has stated that it is committed to achieving a fair and equitable agreement with its union workforce. Still, CEO Scott Kirby has repeatedly demanded the airline return to its dark history of outsourcing employees to low-wage contractors – a return that no union worker supports.

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Do Airline Contracts Expire?

February 22, 2023

You’ve probably heard of the Railway Labor Act if you work at an airline or are a frequent air traveler. This federal law, enacted in 1926, established a framework for labor-management relations in the railroad and airline industries. One of the Railway Labor Act’s most significant features is how it governs airline labor contracts.

Compared to most labor contracts with an expiration date set in stone, union contracts at airlines never truly expire. Instead, they become amendable after a particular date. This means that even if a union contract has passed its amendable date, it remains in effect until a new agreement is reached. Another way to think of it is to consider a union contract at an airline or railroad as “updatable” after a specified date instead of “expired.”

This unique feature of airline labor contracts results from the Railway Labor Act’s goal of promoting stability and avoiding disruptive labor disputes in industries essential to the national economy. Under the Act, airlines and their unions must engage in bargaining and mediation procedures before any work stoppages or strikes occur. This is intended to provide a safety net against any disruption to air travel that could have far-reaching consequences.

Many union contracts governed by the Railway Labor Act have amendable dates about three years after they are signed. Once the amendable date has passed and the agreement can be updated, both sides have a 30-day window to request to open negotiations. The contract will renew if the parties do not request talks during this time.

It’s important to note that the amendable date is one of many opportunities for airlines and their unions to change their labor agreements. Both sides can agree to negotiate outside of this window, and many airlines and unions do so regularly to address changes in the industry and other factors.

The Railway Labor Act’s framework for airline labor contracts has helped to promote stability and avoid disruptions in air travel for almost a century. While negotiating new agreements can be lengthy and complex, it has also led to a relatively stable labor environment in an industry essential to the nation’s economy.

The Railway Labor Act got its name because it was first drafted to prevent powerful rail unions from paralyzing national transportation, which relied heavily on railroads at the time. Airlines were added to the Act once they began to rival rail as a critical method of travel and shipping.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) has been negotiating with United Airlines for months over new labor contracts covering thousands of employees. The two sides have made some progress, but one sticking point has yet to be resolved: job security and status protections for workers.

According to the Machinists Union, these protections are critical for ensuring United employees have a stable and secure work environment. The union has proposed specific language that would provide significant job security and protections for customer service and ramp workers, stores, trainers, and load planners at the airline. However, United has yet to include these provisions in any updated contract, leading to an increasingly tense negotiation stalemate.

By putting profits ahead of its workers and failing to provide the job security and protections necessary in today’s airline industry, United is positioning itself at a competitive disadvantage. Staffing issues continue to plague the airline industry as carriers seek to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. While most air travel was grounded in 2020, United offered lucrative payouts to entice as many people as possible to retire as soon as possible. The policy allowed United to pocket millions in unspent wage support payments the airline collected from taxpayers.

United, for its part, has stated that it is committed to achieving a fair and equitable agreement with its union workforce. Still, CEO Scott Kirby has repeatedly demanded the airline return to its dark history of outsourcing employees to low-wage contractors – a return that no union worker supports.

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United Negotiations Update

United Negotiations Update

United Contract Negotiations Update

The IAM District 141 Negotiations Committee and United Airlines’ negotiators met this week in Chicago as planned. Your negotiations committee passed to United a proposal that would satisfy IAM members’ priorities as outlined at the beginning of this expedited process last year.

We revised our base wage proposals based on recent developments in our industry in like work classifications. IAM members at United Airlines deserve industry-best wage rates, and we are committed to achieving that.

The parties remain far apart on the critical issue of job security. As we have said from the start, we will not come to any agreement with United Airlines that does not significantly strengthen our work scope protections, our no-layoff protections, and our protection of full-time work. I will reiterate ONCE AGAIN that these scope and job security elements are necessary to reach an agreement.

I also want every IAM member at United to know that our scope and job security proposals exist in other IAM agreements in the airline industry. Our proposals are reasonable and justified in every way possible. Most importantly, IAM members have spoken loud and clear that achieving real job security is our top priority. Unfortunately, United management currently believes IAM-United employees don’t deserve that type of job protection. That’s unacceptable.

United negotiators will review our latest proposal. IAM District 141 and United management plan to meet next on March 8, 2023. We will report back to the membership immediately after this next meeting.

In Solidarity,

Your Negotiating Committee
Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Andrea’ Myers
Terry Stansbury
Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair, 
District 141,
International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin Boards.

PAL Agents Secure New Contract with Locked-In Raises and Retro Pay

PAL Agents Secure New Contract with Locked-In Raises and Retro Pay

PAL Agents Secure New Contract with Locked-In Raises and Retro Pay

IAM141.org
Philippine Airlines (PAL) Customer Service Agents and Sales Representatives have ratified a new collective bargaining agreement at the airline. The deal will deliver six years of 3% yearly add-on raises from 2019-2024 for union members in Customer Service, who will also get back pay and additional benefits. Sales Representatives, who are relatively new to the Machinists Union, recognized on February 9, 2022, will get back pay from that date.

The agreement provides two more holidays per year, improved paid leave, increased company retirement contributions, and an increased travel allowance. For the first time, sales representatives at PAL have been covered by contractual language, which outlines their rights and working conditions. The retroactive pay for the agreement will be up to $2,600 for some sales reps and up to $11,000 for all other unified agents.

The vote was held Monday, February 13, through Wednesday, February 15, and was conducted electronically. The deal covers Philippine Airlines agents’ Customer Service and Sales Representatives in Honolulu, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York.

Despite being one of the smaller bargaining units represented in Machinists Union District 141, PAL’s workgroup negotiated a contract that met the priorities of union members and won unanimous ratification.

Mike Klemm, the district president of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) that represents PAL’s sales representatives and other agents, praised the agreement, saying, “This new contract provides our members with the fair pay and benefits they deserve for their hard work and dedication to Philippine Airlines. We’re pleased that the company recognized the value of their employees and the importance of investing in their future.”

The IAM represents over half a million workers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico aviation, aerospace, and defense industries. The union has been fighting for fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for its members despite significant challenges facing the airline industry, including increased competition, rising fuel costs, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Klemm emphasized the power of collective bargaining and the importance of workers and management coming together to reach a fair agreement. “This agreement shows what can be achieved when workers and management find common ground. It’s a testament to the power of union solidarity and the importance of collective bargaining in the airline industry.”

The successful ratification of the collective bargaining agreement is a significant victory for commercial airline workers, demonstrating the importance of unions in negotiating fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for workers, even in difficult economic times.

Union negotiator Shannon Robello expressed his satisfaction with the deal, saying, “This new collective bargaining agreement provides the fair compensation and benefits our members deserve, recognizing their important contributions to the company’s success.”

Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the commercial aviation industry is rebounding in a big way. The number of passengers passing through TSA checkpoints has been steadily increasing in recent months, with more people traveling for business and leisure as restrictions ease and vaccinations become more widespread. Although ticket prices have risen in response to pent-up demand, consumers are still eager to fly, reflecting the renewed sense of the value and reliability of air travel.

“Sean Ryan, Kaleb Rosa, John Burgwinkel, and everyone that helped work on the Negotiating Committee did a fantastic job,” said Robello. “These guys deserve enormous respect for their hard work developing this agreement.”

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Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the Machinists Union

PAL Agents Secure New Contract with Locked-In Raises and Retro Pay

February 17, 2023

Philippine Airlines (PAL) Customer Service Agents and Sales Representatives have ratified a new collective bargaining agreement at the airline. The deal will deliver six years of 3% yearly add-on raises from 2019-2024 for union members in Customer Service, who will also get back pay and additional benefits. Sales Representatives, who are relatively new to the Machinists Union, recognized on February 9, 2022, will get back pay from that date.

The agreement provides two more holidays per year, improved paid leave, increased company retirement contributions, and an increased travel allowance. For the first time, sales representatives at PAL have been covered by contractual language, which outlines their rights and working conditions. The retroactive pay for the agreement will be up to $2,600 for some sales reps and up to $11,000 for all other unified agents.

The vote was held Monday, February 13, through Wednesday, February 15, and was conducted electronically. The deal covers Philippine Airlines agents’ Customer Service and Sales Representatives in Honolulu, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York.

Despite being one of the smaller bargaining units represented in Machinists Union District 141, PAL’s workgroup negotiated a contract that met the priorities of union members and won unanimous ratification.

Mike Klemm, the district president of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) that represents PAL’s sales representatives and other agents, praised the agreement, saying, “This new contract provides our members with the fair pay and benefits they deserve for their hard work and dedication to Philippine Airlines. We’re pleased that the company recognized the value of their employees and the importance of investing in their future.”

The IAM represents over half a million workers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico aviation, aerospace, and defense industries. The union has been fighting for fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for its members despite significant challenges facing the airline industry, including increased competition, rising fuel costs, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Klemm emphasized the power of collective bargaining and the importance of workers and management coming together to reach a fair agreement. “This agreement shows what can be achieved when workers and management find common ground. It’s a testament to the power of union solidarity and the importance of collective bargaining in the airline industry.”

The successful ratification of the collective bargaining agreement is a significant victory for commercial airline workers, demonstrating the importance of unions in negotiating fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for workers, even in difficult economic times.

Union negotiator Shannon Robello expressed his satisfaction with the deal, saying, “This new collective bargaining agreement provides the fair compensation and benefits our members deserve, recognizing their important contributions to the company’s success.”

Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the commercial aviation industry is rebounding in a big way. The number of passengers passing through TSA checkpoints has been steadily increasing in recent months, with more people traveling for business and leisure as restrictions ease and vaccinations become more widespread. Although ticket prices have risen in response to pent-up demand, consumers are still eager to fly, reflecting the renewed sense of the value and reliability of air travel.

“Sean Ryan, Kaleb Rosa, John Burgwinkel, and everyone that helped work on the Negotiating Committee did a fantastic job,” said Robello. “These guys deserve enormous respect for their hard work developing this agreement.”

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