United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

IAM141.org

United Airlines officials announced today that 460 residents of Guam have relocated to Denver after accepting positions as ramp agents, following a 2-day job fair held on the island in January.

The move follows months of efforts by the airline to fill vacancies and hire new agents for a planned expansion in Denver, which is planned to eventually add about 1,800 new workers. About 2,600 Guam residents applied for the jobs, with 460 making it through the highly-specialized hiring process.

Entry-level wages in the Denver area start at around $20 an hour, with the union-negotiated payscales topping out at about $90,000 a year. Despite the high pay and union-protected job security, United has struggled to find new hires to work at Denver International. Efforts to find new workers have involved moving bonuses ranging well into the thousands of dollars.

Recently, United Airlines CFO Gerry Laderman dismissed speculation that the carrier could move its Headquarters from Chicago to Denver despite its recent purchase of over 100 acres of land near Denver International Airport.

Laderman was asked about the possible move at a September 6 investment conference.

“There are no imminent plans for that,” Laderman told the TD Cowen 16th annual Global Transportation Conference investors. “We have a long-term lease at the Willis Tower, our Headquarters. We’ve been there for decades in Chicago.”

The carrier recently purchased over 100 acres near Denver International Airport as part of a multi-million dollar expansion in the region, which includes a renewed presence at Colorado Springs. The investments led to some media speculation that the airline was considering relocating its Headquarters to the Denver area.

Laderman compared Denver to Houston, the home of former Continental Airlines, until the airline’s 2010 merger with United Airlines. “It’s fair to say Denver is like Houston. “We have a lot of facilities in Houston, and our in-flight training center’s there,” he said. “We have all sorts of operations there,” he continued. “Denver’s the same way.”

“We’ve outgrown it,” he said. “So one of the first things we’ll do with that new space we have is we have now a location to be able to expand the flight training center. And then over the years, we’ll find other opportunities.”

The idea that United might be interested in relocating to Denver is plausible; the land purchase was just the most recent action fueling such speculation. Denver is the second-busiest hub in United’s system, ranking right behind Houston’s IAH.

Denver rarely sees the types of stormy weather found in Chicago or Houston, where severe weather is a near-constant concern. Annually, Denver sees an average of 300 days of sunshine. Its position in the center of the United States would also give the carrier a Headquarters located about the same distance from its primary hubs, including San Francisco, Newark, Houston, and Chicago.

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United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

September 8, 2023

United Airlines officials announced today that 460 residents of Guam have relocated to Denver after accepting positions as ramp agents, following a 2-day job fair held on the island in January.

The move follows months of efforts by the airline to fill vacancies and hire new agents for a planned expansion in Denver, which is planned to eventually add about 1,800 new workers. About 2,600 Guam residents applied for the jobs, with 460 making it through the highly-specialized hiring process.

Entry-level wages in the Denver area start at around $20 an hour, with the union-negotiated payscales topping out at about $90,000 a year. Despite the high pay and union-protected job security, United has struggled to find new hires to work at Denver International. Efforts to find new workers have involved moving bonuses ranging well into the thousands of dollars.

Recently, United Airlines CFO Gerry Laderman dismissed speculation that the carrier could move its Headquarters from Chicago to Denver despite its recent purchase of over 100 acres of land near Denver International Airport.

Laderman was asked about the possible move at a September 6 investment conference.

“There are no imminent plans for that,” Laderman told the TD Cowen 16th annual Global Transportation Conference investors. “We have a long-term lease at the Willis Tower, our Headquarters. We’ve been there for decades in Chicago.”

The carrier recently purchased over 100 acres near Denver International Airport as part of a multi-million dollar expansion in the region, which includes a renewed presence at Colorado Springs. The investments led to some media speculation that the airline was considering relocating its Headquarters to the Denver area.

Laderman compared Denver to Houston, the home of former Continental Airlines, until the airline’s 2010 merger with United Airlines. “It’s fair to say Denver is like Houston. “We have a lot of facilities in Houston, and our in-flight training center’s there,” he said. “We have all sorts of operations there,” he continued. “Denver’s the same way.”

“We’ve outgrown it,” he said. “So one of the first things we’ll do with that new space we have is we have now a location to be able to expand the flight training center. And then over the years, we’ll find other opportunities.”

The idea that United might be interested in relocating to Denver is plausible; the land purchase was just the most recent action fueling such speculation. Denver is the second-busiest hub in United’s system, ranking right behind Houston’s IAH.

Denver rarely sees the types of stormy weather found in Chicago or Houston, where severe weather is a near-constant concern. Annually, Denver sees an average of 300 days of sunshine. Its position in the center of the United States would also give the carrier a Headquarters located about the same distance from its primary hubs, including San Francisco, Newark, Houston, and Chicago.

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United CEO Scott Kirby Takes a Private Jet Amid Thousands of Flight Cancellations

United CEO Scott Kirby Takes a Private Jet Amid Thousands of Flight Cancellations

United CEO Scott Kirby Takes a Private Jet Amid Thousands of Flight Cancellations

IAM141.org

Scott Kirby, the CEO of United Airlines, issued an apology on Friday for his decision to board a private aircraft amidst the flight cancellation chaos that left thousands of United’s passengers stranded around the nation earlier this week.

Kirby did not know that chartering a private jet because he could not depend on his airline would outrage stranded passengers. Once informed of the backlash, he issued a characteristically tone-deaf statement of remorse. “Taking a private jet was the wrong decision because it was insensitive to our customers who were waiting to get home,” Kirby said in response. “I sincerely apologize to our customers and our team members who have been working around-the-clock for several days — often through severe weather — to take care of our customers.”

Kirby ended his statement with a vow to better embody his respect for his team’s dedication and the customers’ unwavering loyalty.

The private flight taken by Kirby was from Teterboro, New Jersey, to Denver on Wednesday. This was the same day United canceled a staggering 750 flights, accounting for one-fourth of the day’s entire schedule. This count doesn’t include the cancellations related to United Express flights. Over the week, United canceled approximately 3,000 flights, with the highest number reported at its hub, Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, which has been wracked by chronic staffing issues. The lack of adequate staffing left the airline helpless in the face of typical if heavy, mid-summer thunderstorms.

Kirby blamed the disruption in Newark over the previous weekend to a shortage of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controllers. In an internal communication, he told employees the FAA had “let us down” by restricting the frequency of landings and departures at the airport, where United is a significant presence.

In response to Kirby’s accusations, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) were quick to call out the United CEO.

Buttigieg pointed out that every airline in the region experienced the same weather as United. But only Scott Kirby’s airline saw such mass cancellations and delays. “Look, United Airlines has some internal issues they need to work through,” the Transportation Secretary said in an interview with CNN. “They’ve really been struggling this week, even relative to other U.S. airlines,” he continued.

“I want to be very clear, air traffic control issues are not the number one issue causing cancellations and delays. They’re not even the number two issue. All the data, including industry’s own data is very clear on that,” he said.

Pilots at United echoed the criticisms of the Department of Transportation. “United’s travel disruptions this week stem from one source; Company senior management’s inadequate planning and insufficient investment in the airline infrastructure,” the Union said.

“Our pilots agree with our passengers that this lack of foresight and disregard of warning signs is unacceptable. It’s time for United leadership to change their thinking and invest in its labor, staff support, and facilities with updated contracts instead of ensuring our CEO has the highest salary.”

Pilots at United have been locked in seemingly endless contract negotiations at United. Talks are now in the fifth year as United management refuses to modernize the routing systems that organize flight schedules. According to airline pilots, this failure is resulting in too many pilots “timing out” during their schedules. (For safety reasons, pilots are legally barred from flying too many hours without rest breaks.) When pilots are required by law to stop flying, the airline often has to scramble to find new flight crews who can legally fly.

The high number of canceled flights led to the displacement of United’s planes and crews, severely impeding the airline’s functioning when adverse weather conditions struck on Sunday, as explained by Kirby. As the operational difficulties continued throughout the week, Pete Buttigieg, the Transportation Secretary whose department includes the FAA, noted on Twitter that, barring United, other airlines had bounced back from the storm’s impact. To emphasize this point, he shared a bar graph that compared United’s cancellation rate with the rest of the industry.

There has been some improvement in United’s operations since the middle of the week. FlightAware, a flight tracking service, indicated that the percentage of canceled flights dropped from 26% on Wednesday to 18% on Thursday and further down to 8% by Friday evening. However, even on Friday, United was still leading all U.S. carriers in the number of canceled flights for the seventh consecutive day.

United has committed to rectifying its operations before the anticipated busy July 4 holiday weekend. On Thursday alone, the Transportation Security Administration screened more than 2.7 million people, and a similar or larger crowd was expected on Friday.

The frustration of United passengers was made public via social media and interviews, with many talking about long queues at the airport and being forced to sleep in the terminals after flights were canceled. Unions representing United’s pilots and flight attendants joined in the criticism, accusing the management of inadequate planning, crew scheduling, and operating excessive flights.

The Chicago-based United clarified that it did not pay for Kirby’s private flight on Wednesday. Kirby, who has a net worth of at least $45 million, can more than cover the costs of private charter jets. The airline refused to comment whether Kirby often uses private planes for travel.

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United CEO Scott Kirby Takes a Private Jet Amid Thousands of Flight Cancellations

July 1, 2023

Scott Kirby, the CEO of United Airlines, issued an apology on Friday for his decision to board a private aircraft amidst the flight cancellation chaos that left thousands of United’s passengers stranded around the nation earlier this week.

Kirby did not know that chartering a private jet because he could not depend on his airline would outrage stranded passengers. Once informed of the backlash, he issued a characteristically tone-deaf statement of remorse. “Taking a private jet was the wrong decision because it was insensitive to our customers who were waiting to get home,” Kirby said in response. “I sincerely apologize to our customers and our team members who have been working around-the-clock for several days — often through severe weather — to take care of our customers.”

Kirby ended his statement with a vow to better embody his respect for his team’s dedication and the customers’ unwavering loyalty.

The private flight taken by Kirby was from Teterboro, New Jersey, to Denver on Wednesday. This was the same day United canceled a staggering 750 flights, accounting for one-fourth of the day’s entire schedule. This count doesn’t include the cancellations related to United Express flights. Over the week, United canceled approximately 3,000 flights, with the highest number reported at its hub, Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, which has been wracked by chronic staffing issues. The lack of adequate staffing left the airline helpless in the face of typical if heavy, mid-summer thunderstorms.

Kirby blamed the disruption in Newark over the previous weekend to a shortage of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controllers. In an internal communication, he told employees the FAA had “let us down” by restricting the frequency of landings and departures at the airport, where United is a significant presence.

In response to Kirby’s accusations, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) were quick to call out the United CEO.

Buttigieg pointed out that every airline in the region experienced the same weather as United. But only Scott Kirby’s airline saw such mass cancellations and delays. “Look, United Airlines has some internal issues they need to work through,” the Transportation Secretary said in an interview with CNN. “They’ve really been struggling this week, even relative to other U.S. airlines,” he continued.

“I want to be very clear, air traffic control issues are not the number one issue causing cancellations and delays. They’re not even the number two issue. All the data, including industry’s own data is very clear on that,” he said.

Pilots at United echoed the criticisms of the Department of Transportation. “United’s travel disruptions this week stem from one source; Company senior management’s inadequate planning and insufficient investment in the airline infrastructure,” the Union said.

“Our pilots agree with our passengers that this lack of foresight and disregard of warning signs is unacceptable. It’s time for United leadership to change their thinking and invest in its labor, staff support, and facilities with updated contracts instead of ensuring our CEO has the highest salary.”

Pilots at United have been locked in seemingly endless contract negotiations at United. Talks are now in the fifth year as United management refuses to modernize the routing systems that organize flight schedules. According to airline pilots, this failure is resulting in too many pilots “timing out” during their schedules. (For safety reasons, pilots are legally barred from flying too many hours without rest breaks.) When pilots are required by law to stop flying, the airline often has to scramble to find new flight crews who can legally fly.

The high number of canceled flights led to the displacement of United’s planes and crews, severely impeding the airline’s functioning when adverse weather conditions struck on Sunday, as explained by Kirby. As the operational difficulties continued throughout the week, Pete Buttigieg, the Transportation Secretary whose department includes the FAA, noted on Twitter that, barring United, other airlines had bounced back from the storm’s impact. To emphasize this point, he shared a bar graph that compared United’s cancellation rate with the rest of the industry.

There has been some improvement in United’s operations since the middle of the week. FlightAware, a flight tracking service, indicated that the percentage of canceled flights dropped from 26% on Wednesday to 18% on Thursday and further down to 8% by Friday evening. However, even on Friday, United was still leading all U.S. carriers in the number of canceled flights for the seventh consecutive day.

United has committed to rectifying its operations before the anticipated busy July 4 holiday weekend. On Thursday alone, the Transportation Security Administration screened more than 2.7 million people, and a similar or larger crowd was expected on Friday.

The frustration of United passengers was made public via social media and interviews, with many talking about long queues at the airport and being forced to sleep in the terminals after flights were canceled. Unions representing United’s pilots and flight attendants joined in the criticism, accusing the management of inadequate planning, crew scheduling, and operating excessive flights.

The Chicago-based United clarified that it did not pay for Kirby’s private flight on Wednesday. Kirby, who has a net worth of at least $45 million, can more than cover the costs of private charter jets. The airline refused to comment whether Kirby often uses private planes for travel.

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The Perfect Storm: How Weather and Staffing Woes Are Disrupting US Airlines

The Perfect Storm: How Weather and Staffing Woes Are Disrupting US Airlines

The Perfect Storm: How Weather and Staffing Woes Are Disrupting US Airlines

IAM141.org

The past week saw a surge of US airline passengers left high and dry as extreme weather caused a multitude of grounded planes and flight cancellations. However, the weather was only a part of the larger issue causing the travel disruption.

There is a glaring scarcity of staff across US airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration’s air traffic control operations, escalating the already difficult circumstances.

The state of affairs saw a slight improvement on Wednesday at US airports. The FlightAware tracking service reported that about 800 flights were canceled, and an additional 1,400 were delayed by midday ET. Stormy weather around Boston caused an early morning ground stop on Wednesday, holding aircraft bound for Logan Airport at the gate or on the tarmac at various national airports.

Although this shows some progress compared to the 2,200 flights canceled on each of the two previous days and more than 16,000 delayed flights between Monday and Tuesday, the operation is far from running smoothly.

Staffing Issues

One of the key reasons why the US air travel system cannot recover rapidly from widespread weather disruptions is the need for more staff to manage these interruptions.

Despite a substantial injection of $54 billion of taxpayer money into airlines during the pandemic, many airlines considerably scaled back staff during the initial pandemic year when air travel and fares declined. They offered buyouts and early retirement packages, though involuntary layoffs were prohibited. Several airlines also permanently retired older, less efficient planes. The rehiring of staff has proved slower than airlines had promised.

Domestic US airline capacity, calculated by the number of available seats adjusted for miles flown, is still down 10% in the current quarter compared to Q2 2019, before the pandemic, according to data from Cirium, an aviation analytics company.

Additionally, finding available seats for passengers on canceled flights becomes a significant problem, particularly during peak travel periods.

The Transportation Security Administration predicts that this coming Friday, the beginning of the four-day July Fourth weekend will be the busiest air travel day since the pandemic began.

In an interview published by CBS News, Delta CEO Ed Bastian noted that the current situation has improved from last year. However, he conceded to investors that his airline “still [is] not running as optimally as it needs to run. We have improvements we can make. Substantial improvements, over where we were last summer.”

FAA Difficulties

In the same CBS News report, United’s CEO partly largely blamed the FAA for his failure to staff and organize the airline. The FAA, he argued, limited the flight frequency to and from major urban areas such as the three airports in and around New York City. United bore the brunt of the cancellations and delays, mostly centered at its’ hub in Newark.

United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby expressed his dissatisfaction with the FAA in an internal company memo, stating, “The FAA frankly failed us this weekend,” a sentiment he shared with CBS News. Over the weekend, the airline had to cancel 461 flights and postpone 1,972 flights, as per FlightAware data.

In the CBS interview, Kirby claimed that on Saturday, the FAA reduced the arrival and departure rates at its sprawling Newark Liberty International Airport hub by 40% and 75%, respectively. “And that put everyone behind the eight ball when weather actually did hit on Sunday and was further compounded by FAA staffing shortages Sunday evening.”

Kirby, who depends on the goodwill of Federal regulators for authorizations and clearances critical to the airline, was careful to stop short of appearing to cast blame on FAA Leadership. 

In response to Kirby’s criticism, an FAA spokesperson responded by saying they are always willing to collaborate with anyone seriously committed to solving a problem.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, at an unrelated event in South Carolina on Wednesday, shared his thoughts on the situation. He affirmed that conditions have improved compared to last year but acknowledged the need for further progress. He applauded the airlines for their efforts and identified the weather as a significant contributor to the current issues. He refrained from commenting specifically on United’s concerns about the problems caused by the FAA and its air traffic control system.

In the CBS News report, Buttigieg stated, “Anything under our control at the FAA we’re going to be working on and anything under the airlines’ control, they need to step up and take responsibility.” He relayed his travel difficulties to South Carolina, including one cancellation and one delay, which resulted in his arrival being postponed to 2:30 am. He expressed empathy for the plight of many Americans undergoing similar experiences.

In Houstons’ Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH), hundreds of stranded passengers were stranded overnight on Monday, many of whom were forced to sleep in communal rows on the airport floor. The passengers, most of whom were traveling on United, did not have access to restaurants or food. Water was only available via water fountains, and only two restrooms were available. 

The storms or staffing shortages did not directly impact Bush Airport but were still the victim of cascading failures elsewhere in the system. One ramp employee said that none of the early morning “Head Start” flights, which the airline tries to send out early if possible, had departed on time for the past three days.

Union Intervention is Needed

However, one of the major unions at United, the Association of Flight Attendants, pointed out that the issue extended well beyond the FAA and included the airline’s management.

According to a memo shared with media outlets, the union expressed their mounting frustration, pointing out a long list of seemingly endless problems, particularly for those working extended hours. The memo, sent to members on Monday, highlighted extensive wait times with company crew schedulers, indicating problems beyond air traffic control staffing shortages.

When questioned about the flight attendants’ complaints, United responded that “making sure our flight attendants can reach us quickly is a top priority. We have deployed all available resources to catch up on call volume, including increasing staffing in crew scheduling and mandatory overtime on the scheduling team. We also have ways flight attendants can check in electronically for trips and schedule changes.” 

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The Perfect Storm: How Weather and Staffing Woes Are Disrupting US Airlines

June 28, 2023

The past week saw a surge of US airline passengers left high and dry as extreme weather caused a multitude of grounded planes and flight cancellations. However, the weather was only a part of the larger issue causing the travel disruption.

There is a glaring scarcity of staff across US airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration’s air traffic control operations, escalating the already difficult circumstances.

The state of affairs saw a slight improvement on Wednesday at US airports. The FlightAware tracking service reported that about 800 flights were canceled, and an additional 1,400 were delayed by midday ET. Stormy weather around Boston caused an early morning ground stop on Wednesday, holding aircraft bound for Logan Airport at the gate or on the tarmac at various national airports.

Although this shows some progress compared to the 2,200 flights canceled on each of the two previous days and more than 16,000 delayed flights between Monday and Tuesday, the operation is far from running smoothly.

Staffing Issues

One of the key reasons why the US air travel system cannot recover rapidly from widespread weather disruptions is the need for more staff to manage these interruptions.

Despite a substantial injection of $54 billion of taxpayer money into airlines during the pandemic, many airlines considerably scaled back staff during the initial pandemic year when air travel and fares declined. They offered buyouts and early retirement packages, though involuntary layoffs were prohibited. Several airlines also permanently retired older, less efficient planes. The rehiring of staff has proved slower than airlines had promised.

Domestic US airline capacity, calculated by the number of available seats adjusted for miles flown, is still down 10% in the current quarter compared to Q2 2019, before the pandemic, according to data from Cirium, an aviation analytics company.

Additionally, finding available seats for passengers on canceled flights becomes a significant problem, particularly during peak travel periods.

The Transportation Security Administration predicts that this coming Friday, the beginning of the four-day July Fourth weekend will be the busiest air travel day since the pandemic began.

In an interview published by CBS News, Delta CEO Ed Bastian noted that the current situation has improved from last year. However, he conceded to investors that his airline “still [is] not running as optimally as it needs to run. We have improvements we can make. Substantial improvements, over where we were last summer.”

FAA Difficulties

In the same CBS News report, United’s CEO partly largely blamed the FAA for his failure to staff and organize the airline. The FAA, he argued, limited the flight frequency to and from major urban areas such as the three airports in and around New York City. United bore the brunt of the cancellations and delays, mostly centered at its’ hub in Newark.

United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby expressed his dissatisfaction with the FAA in an internal company memo, stating, “The FAA frankly failed us this weekend,” a sentiment he shared with CBS News. Over the weekend, the airline had to cancel 461 flights and postpone 1,972 flights, as per FlightAware data.

In the CBS interview, Kirby claimed that on Saturday, the FAA reduced the arrival and departure rates at its sprawling Newark Liberty International Airport hub by 40% and 75%, respectively. “And that put everyone behind the eight ball when weather actually did hit on Sunday and was further compounded by FAA staffing shortages Sunday evening.”

Kirby, who depends on the goodwill of Federal regulators for authorizations and clearances critical to the airline, was careful to stop short of appearing to cast blame on FAA Leadership. 

In response to Kirby’s criticism, an FAA spokesperson responded by saying they are always willing to collaborate with anyone seriously committed to solving a problem.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, at an unrelated event in South Carolina on Wednesday, shared his thoughts on the situation. He affirmed that conditions have improved compared to last year but acknowledged the need for further progress. He applauded the airlines for their efforts and identified the weather as a significant contributor to the current issues. He refrained from commenting specifically on United’s concerns about the problems caused by the FAA and its air traffic control system.

In the CBS News report, Buttigieg stated, “Anything under our control at the FAA we’re going to be working on and anything under the airlines’ control, they need to step up and take responsibility.” He relayed his travel difficulties to South Carolina, including one cancellation and one delay, which resulted in his arrival being postponed to 2:30 am. He expressed empathy for the plight of many Americans undergoing similar experiences.

In Houstons’ Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH), hundreds of stranded passengers were stranded overnight on Monday, many of whom were forced to sleep in communal rows on the airport floor. The passengers, most of whom were traveling on United, did not have access to restaurants or food. Water was only available via water fountains, and only two restrooms were available. 

The storms or staffing shortages did not directly impact Bush Airport but were still the victim of cascading failures elsewhere in the system. One ramp employee said that none of the early morning “Head Start” flights, which the airline tries to send out early if possible, had departed on time for the past three days.

Union Intervention is Needed

However, one of the major unions at United, the Association of Flight Attendants, pointed out that the issue extended well beyond the FAA and included the airline’s management.

According to a memo shared with media outlets, the union expressed their mounting frustration, pointing out a long list of seemingly endless problems, particularly for those working extended hours. The memo, sent to members on Monday, highlighted extensive wait times with company crew schedulers, indicating problems beyond air traffic control staffing shortages.

When questioned about the flight attendants’ complaints, United responded that “making sure our flight attendants can reach us quickly is a top priority. We have deployed all available resources to catch up on call volume, including increasing staffing in crew scheduling and mandatory overtime on the scheduling team. We also have ways flight attendants can check in electronically for trips and schedule changes.” 

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Guam Delegate Challenges United’s ‘Absurd’ Prices

Guam Delegate Challenges United’s ‘Absurd’ Prices

Guam Delegate Challenges United’s ‘Absurd’ Prices

IAM141.org

Guam Del. James Moylan is seeking more information on flights into and out of Guam, including the reasons behind “absurd” prices for United Airlines tickets in the aftermath of Typhoon Mawar. He has written two letters, one to United Airlines CEO and President John Kirby and the other to Guam International Airport Authority Executive Manager John Quinata.

In his letter to Kirby, Moylan took issue with current prices for flights to Guam, which he said ranged between $4,000 and $7,000. He questioned whether price gouging was occurring and stated that these fares warrant congressional intervention and review from the Guam Attorney General.

“I am writing this letter to express my concerns with the absurd costs for one to travel to and from Guam, especially as we face the aftermath of major natural disaster in Guam, which will surely impact our economic activity in an adverse manner over the coming weeks and months,” Moylan wrote in the letter to United.

He shared that in his search for a flight home, the lowest airfare he could get carried a price tag of more than $5,000. Moylan said the airfare cost to Guam after Typhoon Mawar was also the focus of intense Hawaii media coverage.

“In 2022, mainland flight would cost $2,500 to Guam and now those seats exceed $3,000. We need some answers because these types of fares will certainly warrant congressional intervention and review from the Guam Attorney General,” Moylan stated in the letter to Kirby.
Although the nonvoting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives said he understood factors such as demand and supply impact airfare costs, he told United that the company needs “to show some compassion.”

United routes between Guam and the mainland are not subject to market forces. The carrier holds a monopoly on all flights connecting the island to the United States.

“Island residents should not be penalized with absurd costs to travel to and from Guam, which is exactly what’s taking place,” Moylan asserted in the letter. He asked Kirby to look at the airfare costs and work with him on a solution.

In his letter to Quinata, Moylan requested a status update on the airport facility and a definite date for inbound and outbound travel to resume. While GIAA announced the airport would be operational by the end of May, Moylan said he wanted to confirm that time frame with the head of the airport.

There have been “too many stories and theories circulating in the community” about when passenger flights will be back, the delegate wrote.

“While I understand that the scheduled date of May 31 as an opening was previously announced, our office would like to know if this is definite,” Moylan asked Quinata.

United Airlines, which enjoys a monopoly on direct flights from Guam to the mainland United States, has come under fire recently for its inflated ticket prices. In comparison to prices for similar distances, United’s Guam-mainland fares stand out as significantly higher. The problem has been exacerbated in the wake of the super typhoon that hit the island.

United Airlines ticket prices have shown no signs of decreasing. This has significant socio-economic implications for the residents of Guam, many of whom depend on these connections for commerce, family visits, and in times like these, recovery support. The call is out for United to voluntarily lower its fares or congressional intervention to prevent such monopolistic price gouging.

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Guam Delegate Challenges United’s ‘Absurd’ Prices

June 2, 2023

Guam Del. James Moylan is seeking more information on flights into and out of Guam, including the reasons behind “absurd” prices for United Airlines tickets in the aftermath of Typhoon Mawar. He has written two letters, one to United Airlines CEO and President John Kirby and the other to Guam International Airport Authority Executive Manager John Quinata.

In his letter to Kirby, Moylan took issue with current prices for flights to Guam, which he said ranged between $4,000 and $7,000. He questioned whether price gouging was occurring and stated that these fares warrant congressional intervention and review from the Guam Attorney General.

“I am writing this letter to express my concerns with the absurd costs for one to travel to and from Guam, especially as we face the aftermath of major natural disaster in Guam, which will surely impact our economic activity in an adverse manner over the coming weeks and months,” Moylan wrote in the letter to United.

He shared that in his search for a flight home, the lowest airfare he could get carried a price tag of more than $5,000. Moylan said the airfare cost to Guam after Typhoon Mawar was also the focus of intense Hawaii media coverage.

“In 2022, mainland flight would cost $2,500 to Guam and now those seats exceed $3,000. We need some answers because these types of fares will certainly warrant congressional intervention and review from the Guam Attorney General,” Moylan stated in the letter to Kirby.
Although the nonvoting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives said he understood factors such as demand and supply impact airfare costs, he told United that the company needs “to show some compassion.”

United routes between Guam and the mainland are not subject to market forces. The carrier holds a monopoly on all flights connecting the island to the United States.

“Island residents should not be penalized with absurd costs to travel to and from Guam, which is exactly what’s taking place,” Moylan asserted in the letter. He asked Kirby to look at the airfare costs and work with him on a solution.

In his letter to Quinata, Moylan requested a status update on the airport facility and a definite date for inbound and outbound travel to resume. While GIAA announced the airport would be operational by the end of May, Moylan said he wanted to confirm that time frame with the head of the airport.

There have been “too many stories and theories circulating in the community” about when passenger flights will be back, the delegate wrote.

“While I understand that the scheduled date of May 31 as an opening was previously announced, our office would like to know if this is definite,” Moylan asked Quinata.

United Airlines, which enjoys a monopoly on direct flights from Guam to the mainland United States, has come under fire recently for its inflated ticket prices. In comparison to prices for similar distances, United’s Guam-mainland fares stand out as significantly higher. The problem has been exacerbated in the wake of the super typhoon that hit the island.

United Airlines ticket prices have shown no signs of decreasing. This has significant socio-economic implications for the residents of Guam, many of whom depend on these connections for commerce, family visits, and in times like these, recovery support. The call is out for United to voluntarily lower its fares or congressional intervention to prevent such monopolistic price gouging.

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Largest Non-Strike Rally in Airline History

Largest Non-Strike Rally in Airline History

Largest Non-Strike Rally in Airline History

IAM141.org

HOUSTON – The largest non-strike rally in the history of commercial aviation took place on Friday. Thousands of airline workers from five different Unions joined forces at ten airports to call attention to foot-dragging by United Airlines in ongoing contract talks with the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA).

According to estimates from ALPA Spokesman Captain Michael Williams, about 3,000 Pilots participated in the rallies, representing about 20% of the 15,000 Pilots at the carrier. Over 400 Pilots, Fleet and Passenger Service, Mechanics and other workgroups attended one rally in Houston.

Pilots at United have been working without a raise for over four years while contract talks seem all but stalled.

According to Williams, the protracted negotiations have left Pilots at United all but last in line among workgroups at the carrier. He also stressed that the longer Pilots go without an updated agreement, the longer the airline will be at a competitive disadvantage as it attempts to attract new pilots.

“United management’s vision of “United Next” cannot happen without a Contract First,” he told a group of media outlets and reporters covering the Houston event.

The demonstrations are happening just before what could be a record-breaking but nightmarish summer travel season.

This summer is expected to be among the most frustrating for air travelers since airlines were deregulated in 1978. Airlines are raising fares, overselling flights, and lacking critical staff to load and unload passengers and baggage onto planes. According to industry watchers, airlines are struggling to keep up with the post-pandemic surge in demand. The staff shortage is already causing flight cancellations and delays, notably Southwest, whose Christmas meltdown saw thousands of cancellations and delays and cost the carrier more than $500 million.

The leader of the United Airlines Pilots’ Union, Garth Thompson, said in a recent interview that the airline is refusing to match new benchmark pay rates for the aviation industry.

They also want their new contract to have equal or better work-life balance. He said that any proposal from the airline that does not meet these expectations will not be ratified.

In March, the Airline Pilots Association (ALPA) negotiated a massive 34% pay increase at Delta Air Lines, improving wages and benefits by $7 billion. The deal helps to establish Delta as a more attractive employer amid a nationwide pilot shortage.

“We expect our contract to raise the bar from Delta’s contract,” Thompson said in an interview with Reuters this week. “We’re not just looking for more money, we’re looking for several areas of improvement that we’ve been waiting a long time to achieve.”

The Union stated that a tentative contract proposed last year failed to meet the minimum requirements of Pilots, resulting in an overwhelming rejection by the Union.

United Airlines is touting an optimistic growth plan called “United Next.” However, the pilot group is pointing out that without an industry-leading agreement, management won’t be able to expand in the way they want unless the company can hire and retain the best pilots. The failed deal and a new high bar at other properties have unified the pilot group.

“We’ve all heard of or witnessed United executives claiming they’re ready to conclude negotiations toward an industry-leading agreement,” Thompson said. “Having noted the increasing boldness and frequency of their assertions, it’s time for them to prove the extent of their sincerity.”

Thompson noted the increasing boldness and frequency of their assertions and said that it was time for them to prove the extent of their sincerity.

In addition to ALPA, the rallies were attended by The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA), The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the Professional Airline Flight Control Association (PAFA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Members of IAMAW Locals 811 and 2198 pose for a group photo following a rally that drew over 400 Union Members near Bush Intercontinental Airport. The rally was one of ten held at major airports around the nation. 

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Largest Non-Strike Rally in Airline History

MAY 12, 2023

HOUSTON – The largest non-strike rally in the history of commercial aviation took place on Friday. Thousands of airline workers from five different Unions joined forces at ten airports to call attention to foot-dragging by United Airlines in ongoing contract talks with the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA).

According to estimates from ALPA Spokesman Captain Michael Williams, about 3,000 Pilots participated in the rallies, representing about 20% of the 15,000 Pilots at the carrier. Over 400 Pilots, Fleet and Passenger Service, Mechanics and other workgroups attended one rally in Houston.

Pilots at United have been working without a raise for over four years while contract talks seem all but stalled.

According to Williams, the protracted negotiations have left Pilots at United all but last in line among workgroups at the carrier. He also stressed that the longer Pilots go without an updated agreement, the longer the airline will be at a competitive disadvantage as it attempts to attract new pilots.

“United management’s vision of “United Next” cannot happen without a Contract First,” he told a group of media outlets and reporters covering the Houston event.

The demonstrations are happening just before what could be a record-breaking but nightmarish summer travel season.

This summer is expected to be among the most frustrating for air travelers since airlines were deregulated in 1978. Airlines are raising fares, overselling flights, and lacking critical staff to load and unload passengers and baggage onto planes. According to industry watchers, airlines are struggling to keep up with the post-pandemic surge in demand. The staff shortage is already causing flight cancellations and delays, notably Southwest, whose Christmas meltdown saw thousands of cancellations and delays and cost the carrier more than $500 million.

The leader of the United Airlines Pilots’ Union, Garth Thompson, said in a recent interview that the airline is refusing to match new benchmark pay rates for the aviation industry.

They also want their new contract to have equal or better work-life balance. He said that any proposal from the airline that does not meet these expectations will not be ratified.

In March, the Airline Pilots Association (ALPA) negotiated a massive 34% pay increase at Delta Air Lines, improving wages and benefits by $7 billion. The deal helps to establish Delta as a more attractive employer amid a nationwide pilot shortage.

“We expect our contract to raise the bar from Delta’s contract,” Thompson said in an interview with Reuters this week. “We’re not just looking for more money, we’re looking for several areas of improvement that we’ve been waiting a long time to achieve.”

The Union stated that a tentative contract proposed last year failed to meet the minimum requirements of Pilots, resulting in an overwhelming rejection by the Union.

United Airlines is touting an optimistic growth plan called “United Next.” However, the pilot group is pointing out that without an industry-leading agreement, management won’t be able to expand in the way they want unless the company can hire and retain the best pilots. The failed deal and a new high bar at other properties have unified the pilot group.

“We’ve all heard of or witnessed United executives claiming they’re ready to conclude negotiations toward an industry-leading agreement,” Thompson said. “Having noted the increasing boldness and frequency of their assertions, it’s time for them to prove the extent of their sincerity.”

Thompson noted the increasing boldness and frequency of their assertions and said that it was time for them to prove the extent of their sincerity.

In addition to ALPA, the rallies were attended by The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA), The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the Professional Airline Flight Control Association (PAFA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

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Machinists Union District 141 Supports UAL Pilots’ Picket on May 12

Machinists Union District 141 Supports UAL Pilots’ Picket on May 12

Machinists Union District 141 Supports UAL Pilots’ Picket on May 12

IAM141.org

ALPA / IAMAW – As union members, we know the importance of solidarity and unity. That’s why we stand with our brothers and sisters at ALPA, who are fighting for a fair contract from United management. They are picketing on Friday, May 12, at all UA hubs to demand Contract First/United Next. We urge all union members to join them and show United management we are solid. Their struggle is our struggle.

The United pilots have been in negotiations for more than five years and are still waiting for a contract reflecting their value and sacrifices. United management’s “United Next” plan cannot happen without a Contract First. They need to respect the pilots who make United fly and who have contributed to United’s success.

We invite all Machinists Union District 141 members and other labor union members to join the United pilots on the picket line as we send a clear message to United management. We will not tolerate any delays or excuses. We demand a contract now.

Below is the list of locations and RSVP links for the picket events. Please click on the link for your location and register your attendance. Links will be updated as more information becomes available concerning each picket.

UAL PILOTS’ INFORMATIONAL PICKETING LOCATIONS & RSVPs

Let’s show our support and solidarity to the United pilots on May 12. Together, we can make a difference. Contract First/United Next!

 

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Machinists Union District 141 Supports UAL Pilots’ Picket on May 12

MAY 3, 2023

ALPA / IAMAW – As union members, we know the importance of solidarity and unity. That’s why we stand with our brothers and sisters at ALPA, who are fighting for a fair contract from United management. They are picketing on Friday, May 12, at all UA hubs to demand Contract First/United Next. We urge all union members to join them and show United management we are solid. Their struggle is our struggle.

The United pilots have been in negotiations for more than five years and are still waiting for a contract reflecting their value and sacrifices. United management’s “United Next” plan cannot happen without a Contract First. They need to respect the pilots who make United fly and who have contributed to United’s success.

We invite all Machinists Union District 141 members and other labor union members to join the United pilots on the picket line as we send a clear message to United management. We will not tolerate any delays or excuses. We demand a contract now.

Below is the list of locations and RSVP links for the picket events. Please click on the link for your location and register your attendance. Links will be updated as more information becomes available concerning each picket.

UAL PILOTS’ INFORMATIONAL PICKETING LOCATIONS & RSVPs

Let’s show our support and solidarity to the United pilots on May 12. Together, we can make a difference. Contract First/United Next!

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