Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

18 June 2024

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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WATCH: Storms Blow American Plane from Jet-Bridge

WATCH: Storms Blow American Plane from Jet-Bridge

WATCH: Storms Blow American Plane from Jet-bridge

WATCH: Storms Blow American Plane from Jet-Bridge

IAM141.org

DFW — A dramatic incident unfolded at Dallas Fort Worth Airport on Tuesday when powerful winds pushed an American Airlines Boeing 737 from its gate. The nose of the 90,000-pound aircraft was shoved along the tarmac, disconnecting the loading bridge. Fortunately, no passengers were on board, and maintenance crews are conducting thorough inspections to make necessary repairs. Video footage capturing the event highlights the severity of the storm.

The video above was posted to Youtube and is courtesy of TRIMFEED.

The incident was part of a series of destructive weather events that swept through North Texas. High winds and heavy rain left a trail of damage and knocked out power for thousands. Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins issued a disaster declaration, warning it could take days for some residents to see power restored. The hurricane-force winds nearly collapsed a building in Dallas and caused flash flooding on major roadways, creating significant traffic problems.

These storms follow an earlier round of severe weather on May 7 that left one million Texans without power for days. Some residents are still without power from those earlier events, compounding the current challenges.

Machinists Union members can report any safety concern through the Ground Safety Action Programs (GSAP), which encourage voluntary reporting of safety hazards and incidents. IAM District 141 President Michael Klemm supports these programs to ensure workplace safety improvements.

The Machinists Union Disaster Relief Fund provides assistance to members and their families affected by natural disasters. Union members can contact an Assistant General Chair to determine eligibility for aid.

To see if you qualify for disaster relief assistance, contact your Grievance Committee or Assistant General Chairperson.

We have a quick favor to ask. The IAM Disaster Relief Fund is fully funded by donations from union members, and every contribution makes a difference. Any size of donation is important and helps support our members and their families during natural disasters. Your generosity ensures that we can continue to provide immediate assistance when it’s needed the most.

 

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WATCH: Storms Blow American Plane from Jet-Bridge

29 May 2024

DFW — A dramatic incident unfolded at Dallas Fort Worth Airport on Tuesday when powerful winds pushed an American Airlines Boeing 737 from its gate. The nose of the 90,000-pound aircraft was shoved along the tarmac, disconnecting the loading bridge. Fortunately, no passengers were on board, and maintenance crews are conducting thorough inspections to make necessary repairs. Video footage capturing the event highlights the severity of the storm.

The video above was posted to Youtube and is courtesy of TRIMFEED.

The incident was part of a series of destructive weather events that swept through North Texas. High winds and heavy rain left a trail of damage and knocked out power for thousands. Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins issued a disaster declaration, warning it could take days for some residents to see power restored. The hurricane-force winds nearly collapsed a building in Dallas and caused flash flooding on major roadways, creating significant traffic problems.

These storms follow an earlier round of severe weather on May 7 that left one million Texans without power for days. Some residents are still without power from those earlier events, compounding the current challenges.

Machinists Union members can report any safety concern through the Ground Safety Action Programs (GSAP), which encourage voluntary reporting of safety hazards and incidents. IAM District 141 President Michael Klemm supports these programs to ensure workplace safety improvements.

The Machinists Union Disaster Relief Fund provides assistance to members and their families affected by natural disasters. Union members can contact an Assistant General Chair to determine eligibility for aid.

To see if you qualify for disaster relief assistance, contact your Grievance Committee or Assistant General Chairperson.

We have a quick favor to ask.

The IAM Disaster Relief Fund is fully funded by donations from union members, and every contribution makes a difference. Any size of donation is important and helps support our members and their families during natural disasters. Your generosity ensures that we can continue to provide immediate assistance when it’s needed the most.

 

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Union Members at O’Hare Walk Out on Kirby; Sick and Tired of the Same Old Lip Service

Union Members at O’Hare Walk Out on Kirby; Sick and Tired of the Same Old Lip Service

Union Members at O’Hare Walk Out on Kirby; Sick and Tired of the Same Old Lip Service

7 May 2024

United Airlines is no longer the airline it was under Oscar Muñoz. From 2015 to 2020, this company respected its employees, and, in return, those workers gave the airline the best years in its history.

Recently, United management has been eliminating Customer Service Centers and developing metrics that force our members to meet unreasonable demands. This practice has resulted in poor customer service for our passengers, including mis-boards, as well as increases in damages and on-the-job injuries.

Moreover, company management is demanding that Reservations Agents maintain scorecards of 97% or higher or face unfair discipline. Now, top management has launched an outright assault on Protected Work related to the movement of jet bridges by Passenger Service Employees.

Our Union Membership has had enough. 

Last week, United CEO Scott Kirby walked into a Customer Service Breakroom in Chicago to meet with front-line union members. He had hoped to pose for selfies and chat about how much United values its workers. Instead, all but two employees walked out on him.

Under Article 2 A 1 of the Passenger Service contract, the movement of jet bridges is protected as core work. Despite the clarity of the contractual language, United is insisting that it has the right to move that work to other groups.

In response,  last week, we also concluded a two-day arbitration case to let United management know we are protecting the work of IAM-represented Customer Service Representatives.

The company claims it can assign anyone to do any work covered under the airline’s seven different contracts. Management’s flawed logic would mean that a Customer Service Representative could be told to walk down the jet bridge, position a belt loader to an aircraft, and offload the aircraft. If that sounds like nonsense, that’s because it IS nonsense.

It’s also a sign of absolute disrespect to every IAM member covered under any IAM collective bargaining agreement at United Airlines. Even more maddening, Article 2 A 1 of the Fleet Service contract explicitly states that the movement of a jet bridge is NOT Fleet Service work.

This grievance is in no way an attempt to take work away from our Move Team sisters and brothers. In fact, it’s just the opposite: the goal is to help the Move Team do their job more efficiently by holding the Company accountable for assigning a Customer Service Representative to each aircraft brought to the terminal from another area.

A final decision from this arbitration hearing will take some time to arrive. Both sides are allotted around 30 days to write their post-hearing briefs. Once his process is complete, the Arbitrator will render a decision based on all the evidence and witness testimony.

We expect the decision to be handed down in July.  When we do, we will immediately report back to the membership.

Mike Klemm,
PDGC, District 141,
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers
LGR

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin Boards.

Association Update

Association Update

Recording Secretaries – Please print and post on all IAMAW Bulletin Boards. GET PRINTABLE COPY >>

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United Negotiations Update

United Negotiations Update

United Contract Negotiations Update

23 April 2024

Dear Machinists Union Sisters and Brothers at United Airlines,

As President and Directing General Chair of IAM District Lodge 141, I want to thank you for your participation in our recent pre-negotiation surveys. Your insights are crucial as we begin preparations for the upcoming contract talks with the airline. These negotiations will impact  29,000 union members across Fleet Service, Passenger Service, Storekeepers, Maintenance Instructors, Security Officers, Central Load Planners, and Fleet Technical Instructors roles.

In fact, this was the highest level of contract survey participation in the history of IAM District Lodge 141.

Some of the top priorities are reducing the steps of pay progressions, real, enforceable job preferencing, improved pension and 401k contributions, general work scheduling, quality of life improvements, and for-profit sharing to be in line with other work groups at United Airlines.

While these are some of the top member priorities, your negotiating committee plans to work on all areas of our contracts so that IAM members’ value to United Airlines is recognized and realized. 

In our last communication, we expressed that we believe we can reach the industry-best contracts we deserve by the end of the calendar year. However, that will only be possible IF United Airlines management is serious about treating us with the respect we deserve. United management talks a good game about having the best employees in the airline industry and United being the premier global airline. Now, the time has arrived for United management to walk the walk and not just talk the talk.

Unfortunately, United management has informed us that they will not be available to meet with your negotiating committee until May 21st. That meeting will discuss protocol, scheduling, and the logistics of negotiations. Though this delay is not ideal, we will use this extra time to refine our strategy and strengthen our position.

Thank you again for your engagement. Remember, our strength is our unity.

In Solidarity,

 

Your Negotiating Committee
Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Jill Hazamy
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Terry Stansbury
Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair, 
District 141,
International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin Boards.

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

IAM141.org

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

3 April 2024

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

 

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