Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

 

24 June 2022

This week, IAM District 141 and United Airlines management continued negotiations in Chicago, IL. We continue to be frustrated with the pace of the talks. We are doubtful we will reach the mutually agreed upon, self-imposed deadline of August 1, 2022, to reach tentative agreements for approximately 25,000 IAM-represented workers at United Airlines.

This week’s talks focused on the many facets of Article 2 Job Security and LOA 9, Article 4 Hours of Service, Article 9, Investigations, Grievances and Arbitration, and the vital quality of work/life issues of mandatory overtime and outage relief. While we did make some marginal progress, we still do not have agreement from United management that our job security and scope of work will be at the very least equal to what we have presently. This is very concerning at this stage of the expedited negotiations process.

In other news, this past Wednesday, IAM District 142 announced tentative agreements with Alaska Airlines on a two-year contract extension, which provides industry-leading pay rates that range between 9-17 percent. The tentative agreements cover over 5,000 IAM-represented ramp, customer service, stores, and office and clerical employees. The top-of-scale wage rate is $34 per hour, and the starting rate is $18.50.

Click here to view the Alaska COPS TA.

Click here to view the Alaska Ramp TA.

IAM-represented United Airlines workers in similar classifications earn approximately 10 percent above that of Alaska Airlines workers at the top of the scale. This is due to United being over five times the size of Alaska Airlines. This is welcome news for our contract talks as a rising tide lifts all boats, and United Airlines is poised to report record-breaking revenue generation for the second quarter of 2022.

Make no mistake; if United Airlines management believes it can stick its head in the sand regarding what is currently happening and what has already been negotiated at other carriers, it is sorely mistaken. Our only goal for IAM members at United Airlines is the best contract in the airline industry in all areas.  

Negotiations will continue July 13-15 and the week of July 25.

In solidarity,

Your District 141 Negotiating Committee

Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Andrea’ Myers
Terry Stansbury

Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G. Klemm

President & Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141
#LGR

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.

Machinists Union Negotiates $34/Hour at Alaska Airlines

Machinists Union Negotiates $34/Hour at Alaska Airlines

Machinists Union Reaches Historic Deal at Alaska Airlines

Justice at JetBlue
22 June 2022

Machinists Union Reaches Historic, Industry-Leading Tentative Agreement Extension for 5,300 Members at Alaska Airlines

WASHINGTON, June 22, 2022 – The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) has reached a tentative agreement with Alaska Airlines that, for the first time in the carrier’s history, will put approximately 5,300 Alaska Airlines workers at the top of the airline industry’s pay scale.

The tentative agreement extension covers IAM members who work in Ramp, Stores, Clerical, Office and Passenger Service at the carrier. Alaska Airlines hubs include Anchorage, Alaska; Seattle-Tacoma; Portland, Ore.; San Francisco; and Los Angeles.

If ratified by IAM members at Alaska Airlines, the four-year contract would:

  • Raise base wage rates for all classifications to between 8.9% and 17.4% on Aug. 10, 2022.
  • Further raise all base wages rates for all classifications by 2.5% on Aug. 10, 2023
  • Base wage rate will also increase a minimum of 2.5% on Aug. 10, 2024 and Aug. 10 2025, subject to an industry review.
  • In 2024 and 2025, the agreement calls for an industry review, which will give employees a minimum 2.5% base wage rate or the percentage required to match the top of the scale as the No. 4 airline, whichever is greater.
  • No changes to strong existing medical and other benefits.
  • Longevity pay increases starting after year 6 at 5 cents per hour, and topping out after year 12 and beyond at 35 cents per hour.
  • Strong existing job security language extended until Sept. 27, 2028.

Read full highlights of the tentative agreement here.

IAM members at Alaska Airlines will vote on the tentative agreements in the coming weeks. IAM representatives will also hold contract educational meetings at locations across the country.

“The IAM’s tentative agreement with Alaska Airlines is historic for our union, the carrier, and the entire airline industry,” said IAM Air Transport Territory General Vice President Richard Johnsen. “IAM members have built Alaska Airlines into a perennial top-performing airline, and now, they have an industry-leading contract to vote on that rewards their dedication, skill, and sacrifice.”

“The IAM’s negotiating committee at Alaska Airlines has put in countless hours of hard work obtaining this tentative agreement,” said IAM District 142 President and Directing General Chair John Coveny. “From our leadership to our membership and everyone in between, this tentative agreement is the result of our union’s strength and solidarity.”

“As the largest air transport labor union in North America, our membership knows that they have the strength of the entire IAM at the bargaining table,” said IAM Air Transport Territory Chief of Staff Edison Fraser. “We are proud to present this industry-leading tentative agreement to our hard-working IAM membership at Alaska Airlines.”

“I could not be more proud of the IAM negotiating committee and our membership,” said IAM Air Transport Territory Airline Coordinator Tom Regan. “We look forward to speaking to IAM members at Alaska Airlines from coast to coast about this industry-leading, historic contract.”

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) is the largest and most powerful airline union in North America, representing more than 100,000 air transport members in North America. The IAM is one of the largest and most diverse industrial trade unions in North America, representing approximately 600,000 active and retired members in the aerospace, defense, airlines, railroad, transit, healthcare, automotive, and other industries.

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JetBlue Ups its Bid for Spirit: Now $3.7 BILLION

JetBlue Ups its Bid for Spirit: Now $3.7 BILLION

Up, Up and Away; JetBlue Management
Again Ups its Bid for Spirit: Now $3.7 BILLION

Justice at JetBlue
22 June 2022

Washington, June 16, 2022 – The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) applauds the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee for approving the Global Aircraft Maintenance Safety Improvement Act (H.R. 7321). 

JetBlue management yesterday once again upped its bid to $3.7 BILLION to merge with Spirit Airlines. This is approximately 68% more than the Frontier offer.

You read that right, yes, 68% more.

JetBlue management is totally obsessed with merging with Spirit, and it appears no price is too high.

Management previously cut the summer flight schedule by about 10 percent due to staffing concerns. JetBlue could be investing much more in its people to retain workers that we need and attract new workers, which we also need. But, it seems management is more concerned with merging with Spirit, even as many economists predict a slowing economy
due to rising interest rates to battle inflation.

The tough questions are:

(1) Could this money be utilized more wisely?

(2) Is the total obsession with merging with Spirit good for us?

Management has claimed it will divest routes in the Northeast and gates in FLL. Without a union contract to protect our interests in a merger, we are certainly at risk and that needs to be fixed as soon as possible.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) is one of the largest and most diverse industrial trade unions in North America, representing approximately 600,000 active and retired members in the aerospace, defense, airlines, railroad, transit, healthcare, automotive, and other industries.

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United Negotiations Update: Job Security Talks Continue

United Negotiations Update: Job Security Talks Continue

 

Contract negotiations continued this week in Chicago, IL. IAM and United negotiators focused exclusively on IAM members’ top priority, which is job security. We are cautiously optimistic we can reach agreement on key issues related to protecting our jobs. 

Our approach to this issue is multi-faceted and focused on protecting our work from outsourcing, ensuring that we grow when United grows, and protecting our jobs during economic downturns. 

These protections are necessary to achieve agreements on seven contracts covering over 25,000 IAM members at United. 

Negotiations resume the week of June 20th. 

In solidarity,

Your District 141 Negotiating Committee

Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Andrea’ Myers
Terry Stansbury

Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G. Klemm

President & Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141
#LGR

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.

This Fly is About to Have a Direct Relationship With a Flyswatter

This Fly is About to Have a Direct Relationship With a Flyswatter

The Fly is About to Have a Direct Relationship With A Swatter

Justice at JetBlue
4 June 2022

A recent misleading flyer by JetBlue management claims that the “direct relationship” between JetBlue management and Crewmembers is the best way to “soar highest.” The flyer points to five things as examples of the “benefits” of the “direct relationship.” 

(1) “No fee representation”: Of course, this is at the top of management’s list.
FACT: AT JETBLUE, WE DON’T HAVE REPRESENTATION, SO THAT’S WHY WE DON’T PAY A “FEE.” GO CREWMEMBERS WILL NOT PAY A SINGLE PENNY IN UNION DUES UNTIL GO CREWMEMBERS NEGOTIATE AND VOTE IN A CONTRACT. CURRENTLY, GO CREWMEMBERS DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO NEGOTIATE OR VOTE ON ANY TERM OF EMPLOYMENT.

(2) “Compensation review every two years”:
FACT: THE REALITY IS, MANAGEMENT 100 % CONTROLS THE “REVIEW” PROCESS. GO CREWMEMBERS HAVE NO RIGHT TO VOTE ON WAGE RATES, BENEFITS, OR ANY WORKING CONDITIONS. MANAGEMENT IS FREE TO DO WHATEVER IT WANTS AND EITHER GO CREWMEMBERS ACCEPT IT OR LEAVE THE COMPANY.

(3) “Job Protection”: This one is pretty funny.
FACT: LEGALLY, GO CREWMEMBERS HAVE ZERO JOB SECURITY. MANAGEMENT CAN AND DOES OUTSOURCE OUR WORK. IF WE HAVE A PROBLEM AT WORK, WE HAVE NOBODY TO BACK US UP. WE CAN BE TERMINATED AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON.

(4) “Open door policy and Crewmember appeals process”:
FACT: IN A UNIONIZED WORKPLACE, ANY EMPLOYEE CAN BRING THEIR CONCERNS TO MANAGEMENT. THE UNION DIFFERENCE IS IF WE DON’T LIKE THE ANSWER WE RECEIVE WE CAN APPEAL THE DECISION THROUGH A LEGALLY BINDING, CONTRACTUAL PROCESS IN WHICH A NEUTRAL ARBITRATOR ISSUES THE DECISION. REGARDING JETBLUE’S “APPEALS PROCESS”, MANAGEMENT AGAIN CONTROLS 100% OF THE DECISION.

(5) “Seniority Protections”:
FACT: WITHOUT A LEGALLY BINDING CONTRACT, WE DO NOT HAVE SENIORITY PROTECTIONS OR LEGALLY BINDING RULES ON HOW SENIORITY IS EXERCISED, ACCRUED, OR RETAINED. JETBLUE MANAGEMENT CAN CHANGE THE “BLUE BOOK” WHENEVER IT WANTS. THE ONLY THING THAT WILL PROTECT US IN A MERGER IS A LEGALLY BINDING COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT (CONTRACT). 

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United Contract Negotiations Update: Job Security Focus of This Weeks’ Talks

United Contract Negotiations Update: Job Security Focus in This Week’s Talks 

 

27 May 2022

This week, IAM District 141 and United Airlines management continued contract talks in Chicago, IL. The IAM Negotiations Committee began the week by presenting United management negotiators with a comprehensive list of issues that must be resolved satisfactorily if an expedited deal is to be reached by the mutually agreed upon deadline of August 1, 2022.

The talks then focused on the issue of job security/scope of work, as the Union reminded the Company that no deal could be reached unless the memberships’ top priority of multi-faceted job security is addressed fully and to IAM members’ satisfaction.

In the contract survey and proposal process, IAM members clearly stated that job and work status security and scope of work are top priorities. United CEO Scott Kirby has continually said that IAM members at United deserve an industry-leading contract, which includes rock-solid scope of work, job and work status protections.

Negotiations will continue the week of June 6.

In solidarity,

Your District 141 Negotiating Committee

Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Andrea’ Myers
Terry Stansbury

Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G. Klemm

President & Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141
#LGR

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.