Association Update

Association Update

Recording Secretaries – Please print and post on all IAMAW Bulletin Boards. GET PRINTABLE COPY >>

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

IAM141.org

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

3 April 2024

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

 

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Honoring Their Sacrifice

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Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

Pre-Negotiation Surveys at American Airlines are Now Open

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:

We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members at American. 

This survey will begin immediately and run through April 19. 

The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines. We strongly urge you to take the survey as soon as possible to ensure your voice is heard loud and clear. By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations.

You can take the survey right now using the link below. 

Most members will complete this comprehensive survey within about ten minutes. Your negotiators will carefully study each entry and carry your priorities into the upcoming negotiations. 

Again, your voice is critical to this process. Thank you for your dedication and participation.

In Solidarity,

 

 Greg Cosey
International Representative
Transport Workers Union

 

 TWU Negotiators
Jennifer Platt
Kevin Sullivan
Tim Hughes
Juan Elvira
Brian Oyer
Mike Szwed

 

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair,
District 141
International Association of  Machinists and Aerospace Workers

 

IAM Negotiators
Mark Baskett
Pat Rezler
William Wilson
Rodney Walker
Todd Peck
Mark Romonowski

Please Print and Post on all Union Bulletin Boards

To all Fleet Service Association Members employed at American Airlines:

We are contractually permitted to begin Section 6 Negotiations with American Airlines in September of this year. In preparation for those negotiations, we will be surveying all Association Members at American. 

This survey will begin immediately and run through April 19. 

The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines. We strongly urge you to take the survey as soon as possible to ensure your voice is heard loud and clear. By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations.

You can take the survey right now using the link below. 

Most members will complete this comprehensive survey within about ten minutes. Your negotiators will carefully study each entry and carry your priorities into the upcoming negotiations. 

Again, your voice is critical to this process. Thank you for your dedication and participation.

In Solidarity,

 

 Greg Cosey
International Representative
Transport Workers Union

 

 TWU Negotiators
Jennifer Platt
Kevin Sullivan
Tim Hughes
Juan Elvira
Brian Oyer
Mike Szwed

 

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair,
District 141
International Association of  Machinists and Aerospace Workers

 

IAM Negotiators
Mark Baskett
Pat Rezler
William Wilson
Rodney Walker
Todd Peck
Mark Romonowski

Please Print and Post on all Union Bulletin Boards

January Helping Hands: New Beginnings

January Helping Hands: New Beginnings

January Helping Hands: New Beginnings

EAP Peers:
 
   January is traditionally a month of resolutions, self reflection, reviews and changes. The first Helping Hands of 2024 focuses on new beginnings. There are several ideas about new beginnings and reframing the traditional way of approaching a new year.
 
 2024 is going to be a great year! All of you are playing a part in that by being there for your co-workers! Thank you for all you are doing to support others – please remember that we are here to support you and the work you are doing. Don’t hesitate to call, e-mail, text me or any of the Chairs listed on the .pdf version.
 

Bryan,

Bryan Hutchinson, M.S.

Recent Articles

Federal Judge Slaps Down JetBlue-Spirit Merger, Citing Competition Concerns

Federal Judge Slaps Down JetBlue-Spirit Merger, Citing Competition Concerns

Federal Judge Slaps Down JetBlue-Spirit Merger, Citing Competition Concerns

Federal Judge Slaps Down JetBlue-Spirit Merger, Citing Competition Concerns

IAM141.org

U.S. District Judge William Young blocked the $3.8 billion attempt by Jetblue to purchase Spirit Airlines, citing monopolistic concerns. The decision is a victory for the Biden Administration, who had opposed the acquisition.

 

DALLAS — U.S. District Judge William Young ruled against JetBlue Airways’ proposed $3.8 billion acquisition of Spirit Airlines. The ruling, citing competition concerns, aligns with the Biden administration’s opposition to the merger. The ruling was handed down on Monday. 

In March, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to block the merger, arguing it would increase fares by eliminating Spirit. The DOJ also found airfares were likely to rise if Spirit, a low-cost airline, was removed as an option for air travelers. JetBlue is considering an appeal of today’s ruling. The airline stated the deal is necessary to better compete with larger U.S. airlines.

The Transport Workers Union International President John Samuelsen issued a statement on Tuesday in which he said the decision would end a “period of uncertainty,” at both airlines.

“Both work groups gain in the end,” said Samuelsen. “We won hard-fought economic and work-rule improvements for our JetBlue Inflight Crewmembers while protecting our Guest Service Agents’ contract at Spirit.”

The Transport Workers Union represents 7,000 JetBlue Inflight Crewmembers. On top of regularly scheduled contractual raises, TWU recently wrested from the bosses at JetBlue an additional 17% in pay raises. The TWU also represents Spirit Guest Service Agents at Fort Lauderdale International Airport.

“Robust airline competition makes it more affordable to fly,” The DOJ said in a release dated March 7, 2203. “Travelers depend on low-cost flight options to see the world, go home for the holidays, visit their family and friends, show up to help in an emergency, or travel at the last minute. The Justice Department found that the proposed merger violates the Clayton Act by eliminating the largest, most aggressive ultra-low-cost competitor, grounding Spirit’s most cost-conscious customers, and substantially reducing competition on a significant number of concentrated, overlapping routes that carry millions of passengers.”

“We continue to believe that our combination is the best opportunity to increase competition and choice by bringing low fares and great service to more customers in more markets,” JetBlue said in a response to the decision.

The ruling is a victory for the Biden administration, which has challenged consolidation in various industries, claiming it harms consumers and adds to rising prices. The Justice Department said the JetBlue-Spirit merger would particularly affect travelers dependent on Spirit’s fares.

Judge Young, overseeing the trial last year, stated in his decision that the merger “would substantially lessen competition” in violation of antitrust law.

Following the decision, shares of Spirit Airlines Inc. dropped, while JetBlue shares rose by 8%.

For JetBlue, this is the second major setback in federal court in the space of a year, following the termination of a partnership with American Airlines. Joanna Geraghty will soon replace Robin Hayes, who oversaw both blocked deals in his tenure as CEO.

The decision may allow Frontier Airlines to attempt to buy Spirit again. The two airlines initially announced a deal in 2022, but JetBlue’s higher offer secured the bid for Spirit.

Judge Young’s decision read, in part, “The Court rules that the proposed acquisition violates Section 7 of the Clayton Act. Spirit is a small airline. But there are those who love it. To those dedicated customers of Spirit, this one’s for you. Why? Because the Clayton Act, a 109-year-old statute requires this result –- a statute that continues to deliver for the American people.”

“Summing it up, if JetBlue were permitted to gobble up Spirit -– at least as proposed — it would eliminate one of the airline industry’s few primary competitors that provides unique innovation and price discipline. It would further consolidate an oligopoly by immediately doubling JetBlue’s stakeholder size in the industry. Worse yet, the merger would likely incentivize JetBlue further to abandon its roots as a maverick, low-cost carrier.”

The ruling concluded a 17-day trial featuring Young’s testimony from 22 witnesses, hundreds of exhibits, and extensive evidence submissions. 

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Honoring Their Sacrifice

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The Dawn of the Machinists Union

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Federal Judge Slaps Down JetBlue-Spirit Merger, Citing Competition Concerns

16 January 2024

U.S. District Judge William Young blocked the $3.8 billion attempt by Jetblue to purchase Spirit Airlines, citing monopolistic concerns. The decision is a victory for the Biden Administration, who had opposed the acquisition.

 

DALLAS — U.S. District Judge William Young ruled against JetBlue Airways’ proposed $3.8 billion acquisition of Spirit Airlines. The ruling, citing competition concerns, aligns with the Biden administration’s opposition to the merger. The ruling was handed down on Monday. 

In March, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to block the merger, arguing it would increase fares by eliminating Spirit. The DOJ also found airfares were likely to rise if Spirit, a low-cost airline, was removed as an option for air travelers. JetBlue is considering an appeal of today’s ruling. The airline stated the deal is necessary to better compete with larger U.S. airlines.

The Transport Workers Union International President John Samuelsen issued a statement on Tuesday in which he said the decision would end a “period of uncertainty,” at both airlines.

“Both work groups gain in the end,” said Samuelsen. “We won hard-fought economic and work-rule improvements for our JetBlue Inflight Crewmembers while protecting our Guest Service Agents’ contract at Spirit.”

The Transport Workers Union represents 7,000 JetBlue Inflight Crewmembers. On top of regularly scheduled contractual raises, TWU recently wrested from the bosses at JetBlue an additional 17% in pay raises. The TWU also represents Spirit Guest Service Agents at Fort Lauderdale International Airport.

“Robust airline competition makes it more affordable to fly,” The DOJ said in a release dated March 7, 2203. “Travelers depend on low-cost flight options to see the world, go home for the holidays, visit their family and friends, show up to help in an emergency, or travel at the last minute. The Justice Department found that the proposed merger violates the Clayton Act by eliminating the largest, most aggressive ultra-low-cost competitor, grounding Spirit’s most cost-conscious customers, and substantially reducing competition on a significant number of concentrated, overlapping routes that carry millions of passengers.”

“We continue to believe that our combination is the best opportunity to increase competition and choice by bringing low fares and great service to more customers in more markets,” JetBlue said in a response to the decision.

The ruling is a victory for the Biden administration, which has challenged consolidation in various industries, claiming it harms consumers and adds to rising prices. The Justice Department said the JetBlue-Spirit merger would particularly affect travelers dependent on Spirit’s fares.

Judge Young, overseeing the trial last year, stated in his decision that the merger “would substantially lessen competition” in violation of antitrust law.

Following the decision, shares of Spirit Airlines Inc. dropped, while JetBlue shares rose by 8%.

For JetBlue, this is the second major setback in federal court in the space of a year, following the termination of a partnership with American Airlines. Joanna Geraghty will soon replace Robin Hayes, who oversaw both blocked deals in his tenure as CEO.

The decision may allow Frontier Airlines to attempt to buy Spirit again. The two airlines initially announced a deal in 2022, but JetBlue’s higher offer secured the bid for Spirit.

Judge Young’s decision read, in part, “The Court rules that the proposed acquisition violates Section 7 of the Clayton Act. Spirit is a small airline. But there are those who love it. To those dedicated customers of Spirit, this one’s for you. Why? Because the Clayton Act, a 109-year-old statute requires this result –- a statute that continues to deliver for the American people.”

“Summing it up, if JetBlue were permitted to gobble up Spirit -– at least as proposed — it would eliminate one of the airline industry’s few primary competitors that provides unique innovation and price discipline. It would further consolidate an oligopoly by immediately doubling JetBlue’s stakeholder size in the industry. Worse yet, the merger would likely incentivize JetBlue further to abandon its roots as a maverick, low-cost carrier.”

The ruling concluded a 17-day trial featuring Young’s testimony from 22 witnesses, hundreds of exhibits, and extensive evidence submissions. 

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Transcript: Alaska Airlines Pilot Calm Under Depressure

Transcript: Alaska Airlines Pilot Calm Under Depressure

Transcript: Alaska Airlines Pilot Calm Under Depressure

Transcript: Alaska Airlines Pilot Calm Under Depressure

IAM141.org

The pilot flying the Alaska Airlines flight from Portland to Seattle last Friday is getting noticed for her super-chill handling a blowout of a cabin door as her plane was three miles in the air.

Just after 5 pm local time on Friday, an emergency door that had been deactivated and converted for use as part of the regular cabin structure blew out at an altitude of 16,000 feet. The plane was carrying 171 passengers and six crew members at the time.

This terrifying event resulted in the depressurization of the cabin. The force of air rushing in was so powerful that it ripped off the shirt of a young boy, who was held tightly by his mother. Multiple passengers also watched helplessly as their phones were sucked out into the night sky.

The pilots touched down safely at Portland International Airport just 20 minutes after takeoff.  

Fortunately, no one aboard was seriously injured, thanks in part to the fact that the rows next to the door were empty. 

But a larger factor in preventing the incident from worsening was the pilot’s remarkably calm approach to managing the crisis. In fact, her demeanor was so steady and controlled that Air Traffic Control needed to ask if an emergency was happening at all.

Air traffic controller: “Alaska 1282 did you declare an emergency or did you need to return to …”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yes, we are in an emergency. We are depressurized. We do need to return. We have 177 passengers. Fuel is 18-eight.”

The pilot, whose name had not been made public at the time of this writing, was also credited with preventing panic among passengers.

In a report published by NBC News, multiple passengers praised the flight crew for their composure and credited the “calmness” of the pilot’s voice as being what had “kept everyone calm.”

Below: Transcript from Alaska Airlines Flight 1282

Air traffic controller: “1282 foreign approach. Good afternoon. You still have information zero?”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yeah, we do have information zero, we’d like to get lower, if possible.”

Air traffic controller: “Possibility 1282 descend and maintain 7,000.”

Air traffic controller: “Alaska 1282 did you declare an emergency or did you need to return to …”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yes, we are in an emergency, we are depressurized, we do need to return back to, we have 177 passengers. Fuel is 18-eight.”

Jennifer Homendy, Chair of the National Transportation Safety Board, said that “maintenance crews checked the plane and cleared it to fly — but the airline decided not to use it for the long route to Hawaii over water so that it ‘could return very quickly to an airport’ if the warning light reappeared.”

In the wake of the Alaska Airlines incident, other airlines and federal agencies are implementing additional safety measures.

United Airlines, which operates the Boeing 737 Max 9, has begun inspections of its fleet, focusing particularly on the door plugs and pressurization systems. The airline is reviewing installation procedures and adjusting protocols as necessary.

In a memo to employees, the airline said, “As of Monday, service on that aircraft remains suspended, and we have canceled 200 MAX 9 flights. We expect significant cancellations on Tuesday as well, though we have been able to operate some planned flights by switching to other aircraft types, avoiding about 30 cancellations on both Monday and Tuesday.”

As part of the inspections, United is removing two rows of seats and the sidewall liner to access each door plug, a task already completed on most MAX 9s. The process also involves inspecting and verifying the proper installation of the door and frame hardware, opening the door to inspect the area around it and the seal, ensuring any loose door bolts are tightened, and then re-securing the door to ensure it is properly fitted.

United’s teams will then document and correct any discrepancies before an aircraft returns to service. Each inspection requires a team of five United technicians and takes several hours per aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued new inspection guidelines for Boeing 737 Max 9 aircraft. The FAA is ensuring that all airlines adhere to these updated safety measures and inspection requirements in an effort to prevent similar incidents in the future.

Maria Deacon, Tech Ops SVP at United, stressed the importance of diligence during this process. In a message to employees, she said, ‘It’s absolutely crucial we all maintain our focus on safety and compliance, and not be distracted or feel rushed.’

Related News

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their Sacrifice

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The Dawn of the Machinists Union

The Dawn of the Machinists Union

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Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Transcript: Alaska Airlines Pilot Calm Under Depressure

9 January 2024

The pilot flying the Alaska Airlines flight from Portland to Seattle last Friday is getting noticed for her super-chill handling a blowout of a cabin door as her plane was three miles in the air.

Just after 5 pm local time on Friday, an emergency door that had been deactivated and converted for use as part of the regular cabin structure blew out at an altitude of 16,000 feet. The plane was carrying 171 passengers and six crew members at the time.

This terrifying event resulted in the depressurization of the cabin. The force of air rushing in was so powerful that it ripped off the shirt of a young boy, who was held tightly by his mother. Multiple passengers also watched helplessly as their phones were sucked out into the night sky.

The pilots touched down safely at Portland International Airport just 20 minutes after takeoff.  

Fortunately, no one aboard was seriously injured, thanks in part to the fact that the rows next to the door were empty. 

But a larger factor in preventing the incident from worsening was the pilot’s remarkably calm approach to managing the crisis. In fact, her demeanor was so steady and controlled that Air Traffic Control needed to ask if an emergency was happening at all.

Air traffic controller: “Alaska 1282 did you declare an emergency or did you need to return to …”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yes, we are in an emergency. We are depressurized. We do need to return. We have 177 passengers. Fuel is 18-eight.”

The pilot, whose name had not been made public at the time of this writing, was also credited with preventing panic among passengers.

In a report published by NBC News, multiple passengers praised the flight crew for their composure and credited the “calmness” of the pilot’s voice as being what had “kept everyone calm.”

Below: Transcript from Alaska Airlines Flight 1282

Air traffic controller: “1282 foreign approach. Good afternoon. You still have information zero?”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yeah, we do have information zero, we’d like to get lower, if possible.”

Air traffic controller: “Possibility 1282 descend and maintain 7,000.”

Air traffic controller: “Alaska 1282 did you declare an emergency or did you need to return to …”

Alaska Airlines pilot: “Yes, we are in an emergency, we are depressurized, we do need to return back to, we have 177 passengers. Fuel is 18-eight.”

Jennifer Homendy, Chair of the National Transportation Safety Board, said that “maintenance crews checked the plane and cleared it to fly — but the airline decided not to use it for the long route to Hawaii over water so that it ‘could return very quickly to an airport’ if the warning light reappeared.”

In the wake of the Alaska Airlines incident, other airlines and federal agencies are implementing additional safety measures.

United Airlines, which operates the Boeing 737 Max 9, has begun inspections of its fleet, focusing particularly on the door plugs and pressurization systems. The airline is reviewing installation procedures and adjusting protocols as necessary.

In a memo to employees, the airline said, “As of Monday, service on that aircraft remains suspended, and we have canceled 200 MAX 9 flights. We expect significant cancellations on Tuesday as well, though we have been able to operate some planned flights by switching to other aircraft types, avoiding about 30 cancellations on both Monday and Tuesday.”

As part of the inspections, United is removing two rows of seats and the sidewall liner to access each door plug, a task already completed on most MAX 9s. The process also involves inspecting and verifying the proper installation of the door and frame hardware, opening the door to inspect the area around it and the seal, ensuring any loose door bolts are tightened, and then re-securing the door to ensure it is properly fitted.

United’s teams will then document and correct any discrepancies before an aircraft returns to service. Each inspection requires a team of five United technicians and takes several hours per aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued new inspection guidelines for Boeing 737 Max 9 aircraft. The FAA is ensuring that all airlines adhere to these updated safety measures and inspection requirements in an effort to prevent similar incidents in the future.

Maria Deacon, Tech Ops SVP at United, stressed the importance of diligence during this process. In a message to employees, she said, ‘It’s absolutely crucial we all maintain our focus on safety and compliance, and not be distracted or feel rushed.’

Related

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their Sacrifice

Honoring Their SacrificeDear IAM Family; This weekend, we remember those who have given their lives for our freedoms.For more than 136 years, IAM members have been integral parts of our communities. They have fought—and died—in every major American military mission...

The Dawn of the Machinists Union

The Dawn of the Machinists Union

The Dawn of the Machinists UnionIn the smoky workshops of late 19th century America, a revolution was brewing. The Industrial Age, with its booming factories and powerful railroads, had brought both progress and hardship.The Dawn of the Machinists UnionIAM141.org 14...