Important Letter from the United Labor Coalition

Important Letter from the United Labor Coalition

Important Letter from the United Labor Coalition

Important Letter from the United Labor Coalition

IAM141.org

Nathan Lopp

Vice President, Labor Relations

United | Corporate Support Center | 233 S. Wacker Drive WHQLR 25th Floor | Chicago, IL  60606

Dear Mr. Lopp,

Just over one year ago, the United Airlines Labor Coalition raised its concern over United’s codeshare agreement with Emirates Airlines, based partly on accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates.  Today, we raise our concern over employee treatment much closer to home.

Labor relations at United Airlines have deteriorated to the point that lacking labor standards halfway around the world now seem suited to describe the current situation at our own airline.  At the forefront is a draconian and one-sided approach to employee investigations and discipline.  Human Resources is now involved in the smallest and simplest infractions, resulting in consequences orders of magnitude worse than the deed.  Most grievance cases are denied and sent up to the next level with little discretion given to local managers who best know their workforce and issues.

United Airlines filed a supplement to its application for a Haneda slot, which was surrendered by Delta Airlines.  In this long and detailed document, United outlines the reasons it should be awarded authority to fly to Haneda from Houston.  The Labor Coalition finds it instructive that nowhere in this exhaustive brief is mention of a single benefit to United’s labor force, should United be awarded this coveted slot.  In fact, the point is made that IAH-Haneda flights would not be additive, but rather a replacement for existing IAH-Narita service.

Recently, the leaders of United’s unionized employees were asked to submit letters to the Department of Transportation in support of United Airlines’ application for Houston-Haneda authorization.  Such collaboration stems from relationships centered on mutual respect and fair treatment.  Sadly, we believe the current labor/management relationship falls far short of this standard.  For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive.  Such a climate does not exist today, and as a result, the United Airlines Union Coalition agrees it is inappropriate to support United’s application for Houston-Haneda service.

Respectfully,

Ken Diaz

Mike Klemm

Garth Thompson

Craig Symons

Joe Ferreira

MEC President

President

Master Chair

President

Dir. Airline Div.

AFA-UAL

IAM-UAL

ALPA-UAL

PAFCA-UAL

IBT-UAL

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Important Letter from the United Labor Coalition

17 November 2023

Nathan Lopp

Vice President, Labor Relations

United | Corporate Support Center | 233 S. Wacker Drive WHQLR 25th Floor | Chicago, IL  60606

Dear Mr. Lopp,

Just over one year ago, the United Airlines Labor Coalition raised its concern over United’s codeshare agreement with Emirates Airlines, based partly on accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates.  Today, we raise our concern over employee treatment much closer to home.

Labor relations at United Airlines have deteriorated to the point that lacking labor standards halfway around the world now seem suited to describe the current situation at our own airline.  At the forefront is a draconian and one-sided approach to employee investigations and discipline.  Human Resources is now involved in the smallest and simplest infractions, resulting in consequences orders of magnitude worse than the deed.  Most grievance cases are denied and sent up to the next level with little discretion given to local managers who best know their workforce and issues.

United Airlines filed a supplement to its application for a Haneda slot, which was surrendered by Delta Airlines.  In this long and detailed document, United outlines the reasons it should be awarded authority to fly to Haneda from Houston.  The Labor Coalition finds it instructive that nowhere in this exhaustive brief is mention of a single benefit to United’s labor force, should United be awarded this coveted slot.  In fact, the point is made that IAH-Haneda flights would not be additive, but rather a replacement for existing IAH-Narita service.

Recently, the leaders of United’s unionized employees were asked to submit letters to the Department of Transportation in support of United Airlines’ application for Houston-Haneda authorization.  Such collaboration stems from relationships centered on mutual respect and fair treatment.  Sadly, we believe the current labor/management relationship falls far short of this standard.  For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive.  Such a climate does not exist today, and as a result, the United Airlines Union Coalition agrees it is inappropriate to support United’s application for Houston-Haneda service.

Respectfully,

Ken Diaz

Mike Klemm

Garth Thompson

Craig Symons

Joe Ferreira

MEC President

President

Master Chair

President

Dir. Airline Div.

AFA-UAL

IAM-UAL

ALPA-UAL

PAFCA-UAL

IBT-UAL

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Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

IAM141.org

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

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Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

16 November 2023

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

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United Pilots Ratify New Contract Worth $10 Billion

United Pilots Ratify New Contract Worth $10 Billion

United Pilots Ratify New Contract Worth $10 Billion

United Pilots Ratify New Contract Worth $10 Billion

IAM141.org

CHICAGO — United Airlines’ pilots have approved a new four-year agreement valued at over $10 billion, as stated by their union.

Previously, the union mentioned that this agreement would lead to a pay increase of up to 40% throughout the four years.

On Friday, the Air Line Pilots Association disclosed that 82% of participating pilots voted in favor of the new terms.

Garth Thompson, the head of the union’s United faction, described it as a pioneering contract that “delivers considerable advantages to our pilots.”

United follows Delta Air Lines and American Airlines in securing new pilot contracts, mitigating tensions with a crucial labor faction, and ensuring the airline can attract critical staff in a tight labor market. Pilots at Southwest Airlines, represented by a different union, and flight attendants at various airlines are still in the negotiation phase.

The union representing the pilots stated that the contract with United encompasses unprecedented raises and enhancements in employment terms, sick leave, holiday duration, and retirement perks. United employs approximately 16,000 pilots.

This contract is set to be in effect until September 30, 2027.

 

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United Pilots Ratify New Contract Worth $10 Billion

September 29, 2023

CHICAGO — United Airlines’ pilots have approved a new four-year agreement valued at over $10 billion, as stated by their union.

Previously, the union mentioned that this agreement would lead to a pay increase of up to 40% throughout the four years.

On Friday, the Air Line Pilots Association disclosed that 82% of participating pilots voted in favor of the new terms.

Garth Thompson, the head of the union’s United faction, described it as a pioneering contract that “delivers considerable advantages to our pilots.”

United follows Delta Air Lines and American Airlines in securing new pilot contracts, mitigating tensions with a crucial labor faction, and ensuring the airline can attract critical staff in a tight labor market. Pilots at Southwest Airlines, represented by a different union, and flight attendants at various airlines are still in the negotiation phase.

The union representing the pilots stated that the contract with United encompasses unprecedented raises and enhancements in employment terms, sick leave, holiday duration, and retirement perks. United employs approximately 16,000 pilots.

This contract is set to be in effect until September 30, 2027.

 

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United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

IAM141.org

United Airlines officials announced today that 460 residents of Guam have relocated to Denver after accepting positions as ramp agents, following a 2-day job fair held on the island in January.

The move follows months of efforts by the airline to fill vacancies and hire new agents for a planned expansion in Denver, which is planned to eventually add about 1,800 new workers. About 2,600 Guam residents applied for the jobs, with 460 making it through the highly-specialized hiring process.

Entry-level wages in the Denver area start at around $20 an hour, with the union-negotiated payscales topping out at about $90,000 a year. Despite the high pay and union-protected job security, United has struggled to find new hires to work at Denver International. Efforts to find new workers have involved moving bonuses ranging well into the thousands of dollars.

Recently, United Airlines CFO Gerry Laderman dismissed speculation that the carrier could move its Headquarters from Chicago to Denver despite its recent purchase of over 100 acres of land near Denver International Airport.

Laderman was asked about the possible move at a September 6 investment conference.

“There are no imminent plans for that,” Laderman told the TD Cowen 16th annual Global Transportation Conference investors. “We have a long-term lease at the Willis Tower, our Headquarters. We’ve been there for decades in Chicago.”

The carrier recently purchased over 100 acres near Denver International Airport as part of a multi-million dollar expansion in the region, which includes a renewed presence at Colorado Springs. The investments led to some media speculation that the airline was considering relocating its Headquarters to the Denver area.

Laderman compared Denver to Houston, the home of former Continental Airlines, until the airline’s 2010 merger with United Airlines. “It’s fair to say Denver is like Houston. “We have a lot of facilities in Houston, and our in-flight training center’s there,” he said. “We have all sorts of operations there,” he continued. “Denver’s the same way.”

“We’ve outgrown it,” he said. “So one of the first things we’ll do with that new space we have is we have now a location to be able to expand the flight training center. And then over the years, we’ll find other opportunities.”

The idea that United might be interested in relocating to Denver is plausible; the land purchase was just the most recent action fueling such speculation. Denver is the second-busiest hub in United’s system, ranking right behind Houston’s IAH.

Denver rarely sees the types of stormy weather found in Chicago or Houston, where severe weather is a near-constant concern. Annually, Denver sees an average of 300 days of sunshine. Its position in the center of the United States would also give the carrier a Headquarters located about the same distance from its primary hubs, including San Francisco, Newark, Houston, and Chicago.

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United Airlines’ Denver Hiring Spree Draws Hundreds from Guam

September 8, 2023

United Airlines officials announced today that 460 residents of Guam have relocated to Denver after accepting positions as ramp agents, following a 2-day job fair held on the island in January.

The move follows months of efforts by the airline to fill vacancies and hire new agents for a planned expansion in Denver, which is planned to eventually add about 1,800 new workers. About 2,600 Guam residents applied for the jobs, with 460 making it through the highly-specialized hiring process.

Entry-level wages in the Denver area start at around $20 an hour, with the union-negotiated payscales topping out at about $90,000 a year. Despite the high pay and union-protected job security, United has struggled to find new hires to work at Denver International. Efforts to find new workers have involved moving bonuses ranging well into the thousands of dollars.

Recently, United Airlines CFO Gerry Laderman dismissed speculation that the carrier could move its Headquarters from Chicago to Denver despite its recent purchase of over 100 acres of land near Denver International Airport.

Laderman was asked about the possible move at a September 6 investment conference.

“There are no imminent plans for that,” Laderman told the TD Cowen 16th annual Global Transportation Conference investors. “We have a long-term lease at the Willis Tower, our Headquarters. We’ve been there for decades in Chicago.”

The carrier recently purchased over 100 acres near Denver International Airport as part of a multi-million dollar expansion in the region, which includes a renewed presence at Colorado Springs. The investments led to some media speculation that the airline was considering relocating its Headquarters to the Denver area.

Laderman compared Denver to Houston, the home of former Continental Airlines, until the airline’s 2010 merger with United Airlines. “It’s fair to say Denver is like Houston. “We have a lot of facilities in Houston, and our in-flight training center’s there,” he said. “We have all sorts of operations there,” he continued. “Denver’s the same way.”

“We’ve outgrown it,” he said. “So one of the first things we’ll do with that new space we have is we have now a location to be able to expand the flight training center. And then over the years, we’ll find other opportunities.”

The idea that United might be interested in relocating to Denver is plausible; the land purchase was just the most recent action fueling such speculation. Denver is the second-busiest hub in United’s system, ranking right behind Houston’s IAH.

Denver rarely sees the types of stormy weather found in Chicago or Houston, where severe weather is a near-constant concern. Annually, Denver sees an average of 300 days of sunshine. Its position in the center of the United States would also give the carrier a Headquarters located about the same distance from its primary hubs, including San Francisco, Newark, Houston, and Chicago.

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99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

IAM141.org

On Wednesday, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA) announced that American Airlines’ flight attendants have voted in favor of going on strike if the company doesn’t agree to fair contract terms.

According to the APFA, which represents over 26,000 flight attendants at the airline, a staggering 99.47% of the flight attendants have voted to approve a strike.

“Today, we sent a clear message to American Airlines management,” said APFA National President Julie Hedrick. “We are fired up and ready for a contract. They ignore this strike vote at their peril,” she continued. “Our contributions to the success of American Airlines must be recognized and respected.”

The Union is asking to be paid for time spent on the job. Currently, American only pays the Union for the time they spend in the air; the time spent working while on the ground is unpaid. This is done at other airlines, such as Delta, which pays flight crews “boarding pay.”

APFA is also asking for scheduling improvements and better work / life balance.

The vote doesn’t necessarily indicate that a strike is on the immediate horizon. U.S. federal legislation sets high barriers for airline unions to legally go on strike. A federal mediator must declare that continued talks would be futile, a determination that is seldom made. Additionally, intervention from the President or Congress could further postpone or prevent a strike.

Should federal mediation fail to convince the company to offer the Union a fair agreement, the APFA has the option to enter a 30-day cooling-off period. After this period, the flight attendants would be permitted to initiate a strike.

Amid a strong labor market backdrop and growing public support for unions, unionized workers such as pilots, airline workers, and delivery drivers are experiencing increased leverage in negotiations.

Next week, a coalition of labor unions at United Airlines will hold a historic summit at the Machinists Union District Headquarters in Chicago. The meeting will include representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Last week, American Airlines’ pilots ratified a new four-year contract featuring over $9.6 billion in total pay and benefits increases. This move is part of the airline’s competitive strategy against industry rivals like United Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

On August 9, following two years of talks, Transport Workers Union Local 555, the Union representing 19,000 Southwest employees in areas like ramp operations, provisioning, and freight, finalized an agreement with the Dallas-based airline. Pending approval from union members, the new contract would include increased wages and 12 weeks of parental leave, among other benefits. Union members are scheduled to vote on the agreement from September 8 to September 20.

Notably, the pay increases at Southwest are the same as those negotiated on behalf of thousands of Machinists Union at United. The new agreement would grant top-of-scale pay for ground workers of $36.72.

As travel demand remains robust, airlines are scrambling to increase staffing. This urgency has empowered workers to negotiate for better pay and improved work conditions.

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99% Flight Attendants at American Vote to Authorize a Strike

August 31, 2023

On Wednesday, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA) announced that American Airlines’ flight attendants have voted in favor of going on strike if the company doesn’t agree to fair contract terms.

According to the APFA, which represents over 26,000 flight attendants at the airline, a staggering 99.47% of the flight attendants have voted to approve a strike.

“Today, we sent a clear message to American Airlines management,” said APFA National President Julie Hedrick. “We are fired up and ready for a contract. They ignore this strike vote at their peril,” she continued. “Our contributions to the success of American Airlines must be recognized and respected.”

The Union is asking to be paid for time spent on the job. Currently, American only pays the Union for the time they spend in the air; the time spent working while on the ground is unpaid. This is done at other airlines, such as Delta, which pays flight crews “boarding pay.”

APFA is also asking for scheduling improvements and better work / life balance.

The vote doesn’t necessarily indicate that a strike is on the immediate horizon. U.S. federal legislation sets high barriers for airline unions to legally go on strike. A federal mediator must declare that continued talks would be futile, a determination that is seldom made. Additionally, intervention from the President or Congress could further postpone or prevent a strike.

Should federal mediation fail to convince the company to offer the Union a fair agreement, the APFA has the option to enter a 30-day cooling-off period. After this period, the flight attendants would be permitted to initiate a strike.

Amid a strong labor market backdrop and growing public support for unions, unionized workers such as pilots, airline workers, and delivery drivers are experiencing increased leverage in negotiations.

Next week, a coalition of labor unions at United Airlines will hold a historic summit at the Machinists Union District Headquarters in Chicago. The meeting will include representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Last week, American Airlines’ pilots ratified a new four-year contract featuring over $9.6 billion in total pay and benefits increases. This move is part of the airline’s competitive strategy against industry rivals like United Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

On August 9, following two years of talks, Transport Workers Union Local 555, the Union representing 19,000 Southwest employees in areas like ramp operations, provisioning, and freight, finalized an agreement with the Dallas-based airline. Pending approval from union members, the new contract would include increased wages and 12 weeks of parental leave, among other benefits. Union members are scheduled to vote on the agreement from September 8 to September 20.

Notably, the pay increases at Southwest are the same as those negotiated on behalf of thousands of Machinists Union at United. The new agreement would grant top-of-scale pay for ground workers of $36.72.

As travel demand remains robust, airlines are scrambling to increase staffing. This urgency has empowered workers to negotiate for better pay and improved work conditions.

 

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More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

“The Full Story Behind the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident”

IAM141.org

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

 

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

 

Your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has your back.

Navigating life’s challenges, from mental health struggles to substance abuse, becomes easier with our dedicated EAP. As valued union members, you’re entitled to free, confidential, and compassionate support. Beyond personal care, we help demystify insurance and company policies, ensuring you access the best care possible. Remember, your well-being is our priority. Reach out to EAP whenever you need; we’re here to guide and stand by you.

Help can start today: CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

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More Info About the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

August 8, 2023

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

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