Microsoft Update Triggers The Largest Tech Disaster in History

Microsoft Update Triggers The Largest Tech Disaster in History

Microsoft Update Triggers The Largest Tech Disaster in History

Pictured: a passenger posts an image of a handwritten boarding pass.

Microsoft Update Triggers The Largest Tech Disaster in History

IAM141.org

On Friday morning, a global computer outage led to the cancellation of hundreds of flights across the United States, causing delays and confusion at airports nationwide. The disruption also affected international airlines, mass transit in New York and Washington, DC, some 911 operations in the US, banking in multiple countries, Hong Kong’s Disneyland, and the Israeli health service.

FlightAware.com reported that over 1,409 flights into, out of, or within the United States were canceled, with a total of 2,435 cancellations worldwide. Additionally, there were 3,616 delays within, into, or out of the United States, contributing to a global total of 24,802 delays. Charlotte Douglas International Airport advised passengers not to come unless they had confirmed flights. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stated it was monitoring the issue affecting IT systems at US airlines and assisting several airlines with ground stops.

The outage resulted from two issues involving widely used Microsoft systems. On Thursday, some Microsoft clients in the central United States, including some airlines, were affected by an outage on its Azure cloud service system. Microsoft indicated the company had identified a preliminary cause. Some users may still be unable to access certain Microsoft 365 apps and services, including Teams video conferencing. Microsoft is working to restore services for those still experiencing disruptions.

Separately, on Friday, many Windows devices experienced problems due to a flawed security update from CrowdStrike. CEO George Kurtz explained that the company is “actively working with customers impacted by a defect found in a single content update for Windows hosts.” He emphasized, “This is not a security incident or cyberattack. The issue has been identified and isolated, and a fix has been deployed.”

Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, Spirit Airlines, and United Airlines were among the carriers impacted. Delta paused its global flight schedule, while American Airlines resolved the issue early Friday morning. Spirit Airlines’ reservation system was affected, and United Airlines resumed some flights but warned of potential delays.

“Overnight, a third-party software outage impacted computer systems worldwide, including many of our applications, which resulted in us holding all aircraft at their departure airports,” United Airlines said in a statement. “Our computers and systems are gradually coming back online and we are resuming some flights, but schedule disruptions are expected to continue throughout Friday. We have issued a travel waiver to make it easier for customers to change their travel plans via United.com or the United app.”

The travel waiver can be accessed [here].

According to FlightAware, the top four airlines hardest hit by delays are:

– Delta Air Lines: 469 cancellations (12%) and 627 delays (17%)
– American Airlines: 307 cancellations (8%) and 446 delays (12%)
– United Airlines: 223 cancellations (7%) and 512 delays (17%)
– Endeavor Air: 162 cancellations (24%) and 185 delays (27%)

Microsoft acknowledged service disruptions in the central United States on Thursday evening and is working on a fix.

The widespread Windows outages have been linked to a software update from cybersecurity giant CrowdStrike. It is believed the issues are not linked to a malicious cyberattack, cybersecurity officials say, but rather stem from a misconfigured update that CrowdStrike pushed out to its customers. Engineers from CrowdStrike posted to the company’s Reddit forum that it has seen “widespread reports of BSODs on Windows hosts” occurring across its software. The company advised a workaround for impacted systems and issued instructions to its customers in an advisory.

According to WIRED, the outages have had a massive impact on public services and businesses globally. Banks, airports, TV stations, healthcare organizations, hotels, and countless other businesses are facing widespread IT outages. Microsoft and CrowdStrike did not immediately respond to WIRED’s requests for comment on the outage.

Lukasz Olejnik, an independent cybersecurity consultant, said the outages could result in “millions” being lost by organizations impacted who have had to halt their operations. He noted, “It reminds us about our dependence on IT and software. When a system has several software systems maintained by various vendors, this is equivalent to placing trust on them. They may be a single point of failure—like here, when various firms feel the impact.”

Hours after the issues started to emerge, CrowdStrike CEO George Kurtz confirmed that Mac and Linux hosts are not impacted by the update and said that its customers should refer to its support portal.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Microsoft Update Triggers The Largest Tech Disaster in History

19 July 2024

Pictured: a passenger posts an image of a handwritten boarding pass.

On Friday morning, a global computer outage led to the cancellation of hundreds of flights across the United States, causing delays and confusion at airports nationwide. The disruption also affected international airlines, mass transit in New York and Washington, DC, some 911 operations in the US, banking in multiple countries, Hong Kong’s Disneyland, and the Israeli health service.

FlightAware.com reported that over 1,409 flights into, out of, or within the United States were canceled, with a total of 2,435 cancellations worldwide. Additionally, there were 3,616 delays within, into, or out of the United States, contributing to a global total of 24,802 delays. Charlotte Douglas International Airport advised passengers not to come unless they had confirmed flights. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stated it was monitoring the issue affecting IT systems at US airlines and assisting several airlines with ground stops.

The outage resulted from two issues involving widely used Microsoft systems. On Thursday, some Microsoft clients in the central United States, including some airlines, were affected by an outage on its Azure cloud service system. Microsoft indicated the company had identified a preliminary cause. Some users may still be unable to access certain Microsoft 365 apps and services, including Teams video conferencing. Microsoft is working to restore services for those still experiencing disruptions.

Separately, on Friday, many Windows devices experienced problems due to a flawed security update from CrowdStrike. CEO George Kurtz explained that the company is “actively working with customers impacted by a defect found in a single content update for Windows hosts.” He emphasized, “This is not a security incident or cyberattack. The issue has been identified and isolated, and a fix has been deployed.”

Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, Spirit Airlines, and United Airlines were among the carriers impacted. Delta paused its global flight schedule, while American Airlines resolved the issue early Friday morning. Spirit Airlines’ reservation system was affected, and United Airlines resumed some flights but warned of potential delays.

“Overnight, a third-party software outage impacted computer systems worldwide, including many of our applications, which resulted in us holding all aircraft at their departure airports,” United Airlines said in a statement. “Our computers and systems are gradually coming back online and we are resuming some flights, but schedule disruptions are expected to continue throughout Friday. We have issued a travel waiver to make it easier for customers to change their travel plans via United.com or the United app.”

The travel waiver can be accessed [here].

According to FlightAware, the top four airlines hardest hit by delays are:

– Delta Air Lines: 469 cancellations (12%) and 627 delays (17%)
– American Airlines: 307 cancellations (8%) and 446 delays (12%)
– United Airlines: 223 cancellations (7%) and 512 delays (17%)
– Endeavor Air: 162 cancellations (24%) and 185 delays (27%)

Microsoft acknowledged service disruptions in the central United States on Thursday evening and is working on a fix.

The widespread Windows outages have been linked to a software update from cybersecurity giant CrowdStrike. It is believed the issues are not linked to a malicious cyberattack, cybersecurity officials say, but rather stem from a misconfigured update that CrowdStrike pushed out to its customers. Engineers from CrowdStrike posted to the company’s Reddit forum that it has seen “widespread reports of BSODs on Windows hosts” occurring across its software. The company advised a workaround for impacted systems and issued instructions to its customers in an advisory.

According to WIRED, the outages have had a massive impact on public services and businesses globally. Banks, airports, TV stations, healthcare organizations, hotels, and countless other businesses are facing widespread IT outages. Microsoft and CrowdStrike did not immediately respond to WIRED’s requests for comment on the outage.

Lukasz Olejnik, an independent cybersecurity consultant, said the outages could result in “millions” being lost by organizations impacted who have had to halt their operations. He noted, “It reminds us about our dependence on IT and software. When a system has several software systems maintained by various vendors, this is equivalent to placing trust on them. They may be a single point of failure—like here, when various firms feel the impact.”

Hours after the issues started to emerge, CrowdStrike CEO George Kurtz confirmed that Mac and Linux hosts are not impacted by the update and said that its customers should refer to its support portal.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Supreme Court Strikes At Federal Experts

Supreme Court Strikes At Federal Experts

Supreme Court Strikes At Federal Experts

Supreme Court Strikes At Federal Experts

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON – On June 28, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark decision that will drastically alter the government’s ability to enforce workplace safety, aviation standards, and commercial flight operations. This ruling, which ends the Chevron deference doctrine, hamstrings the efforts of agencies like OSHA, the FAA, and others to carry out their regulatory duties.

Chevron deference, established by a 1984 Supreme Court case, allowed courts to defer to federal agencies’ interpretations of ambiguous laws. This was crucial because judges and juries typically do not possess the same level of expertise as the specialists within these agencies. The doctrine enabled experts in various fields to use their knowledge to guide federal agencies and make binding decisions, leading to more informed and quicker regulatory outcomes. Removing Chevron deference means judges will now make binding decisions on subjects they may know very little about, which could lead to inconsistent and prolonged rulings.

For example, instead of deferring to OSHA’s requirements, a judge and jury might now decide if electric tugs are parked too close to a fire exit or if there are enough first aid kits. Similarly, decisions on whether to add or remove fire extinguishers or mandate CPR training could now be subject to court rulings. This could drag out many decisions for years and result in varied outcomes as different juries second-guess one another. If courts in different states reach conflicting rulings, it could create a fragmented regulatory environment, leading to significant uncertainty and challenges for businesses operating across state lines.

Virtually no one supports the end of regulatory oversight except massive corporations. Voters who have grown weary of perceived “over-regulation” of business will not see fewer regulations or rules governing workplace law in the United States. The same number of rules and regulations will still exist. The change is that individuals will need to hire lawyers and take corporations to court if they feel their workplace is unsafe or if workers are fired unfairly. They will no longer be able to rely on OSHA or the EEOC.

The tens of thousands of speedy, customized decisions that federal agencies make each year would be moved to the court system, swamping the non-specialized courts with longer and longer backlogs of cases. This is how regulations were implemented prior to Chevron. Chevron helped calm this chaos and preserved regular court structures for other types of cases.

What Was the Chevron Deference?

Chevron deference was a 40-year-old Supreme Court ruling that allowed government agencies to prioritize public safety and reasonable policy. On June 28, this ruling was overturned by a vote of 6-3.

Many may have never heard of Chevron deference. You might be wondering, “If I don’t even know what it is, why is its overturn such a big deal?”

In short, Chevron deference gave government agencies the liberty to interpret parts of laws passed by Congress that were unclear or ambiguous. It served as a foundation for many bureaucratic decisions that most of us took for granted. While it may not have been on our radars before due to the consistent nature of its application, we will definitely feel the impact of that consistency being upended. Some believe this change will be good, and some believe it will be bad, but experts agree that whatever happens, change will come.

The Impact of The SCOTUS Ruling

This ruling is predicted to impact bureaucratic agencies’ implementation of federal laws significantly. In the past, agencies consulted their own field experts when deciding how to carry out a vague congressional instruction.

However, now that Chevron deference has been overturned, a judge will decide how these laws will be carried out. While the agency will still be able to argue their expert opinions in court, they won’t have the final say on how these laws are implemented. Legal experts predict a large increase in the number of cases over regulatory policy, as this ruling will likely encourage corporations to dispute agency decisions.

The Supreme Court justices stated that the ruling will only affect future policy changes, so anything enacted before the ruling will remain unchanged. This gives companies some time to adjust their future plans to this change, as most organizations won’t feel the effects until a new policy is introduced.

Impact on OSHA

As a federal agency, OSHA is anticipated to be affected by this ruling in several ways. Passing any OSHA standard will take even longer than it already does (which is saying something).

The agency will want to avoid being taken to court and may spend more time and resources on avoiding expensive cases rather than carrying out policy in a timely manner. There is also a chance that these standards will be less effective, as congress members may intentionally write more specific laws to avoid court involvement in the legislation process.

These congress members are almost certainly not experts in the relevant fields. They will have to make their own assumptions on complex topics that they would have left to industry professionals in the past. Overall, we may see a decrease in federal workplace protections, which could impact employee safety and industry worker dynamics.

 

How These Changes Might Affect Your Workplace

If federal legal interpretations are taken out of OSHA’s hands, there may be unclear direction, leading to an increase in on-the-job employee injuries.

This does not mean, “Cancel your safety programs because nobody cares anymore.” Quite the opposite. Workers will still seek out workplaces that demonstrate they value employee safety. So, stay ahead of the curve and zero in on your hazard prevention plans.

Labor and Employment Attorneys Fisher Phillips said of the ruling, “Don’t forget about state and local laws. Even if a court interprets a federal statute in a way that helps smooth a path for you, there is no guarantee that state laws will follow suit. In fact, you may see some state lawmakers and regulators push for increased regulation given the softening that will soon exist at the federal level.”

Impact on Labor Unions and Workplace Safety

The end of Chevron deference could have major implications for labor unions and workplace safety regulations. Federal agencies like the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) often create rules that affect workers and employers. Without Chevron deference, these agencies may find it harder to implement new rules and enforce existing ones.

For labor unions, this change could mean a more challenging environment for advocating for workers’ rights. Agencies like the NLRB may face increased scrutiny when making decisions, potentially leading to fewer favorable rulings for unions. Similarly, OSHA’s efforts to ensure workplace safety could be hampered, as their regulations may be more frequently challenged in court.

Impact on Transportation

The transportation sector could also see substantial changes. The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are responsible for creating and enforcing many rules that ensure the safety and efficiency of the transportation system. With the end of Chevron deference, these agencies might struggle to defend their regulations in court.

For instance, new rules aimed at improving consumer protection, like fare transparency and passenger rights, could face more legal challenges. This shift may slow down the implementation of new safety standards in areas such as commercial spaceflight, maritime operations, and vehicle safety.

In short, the Supreme Court’s decision to end Chevron deference marks a major shift in how federal regulations are created and enforced. For labor unions, workplace safety, and transportation, this change could lead to more legal challenges and slower implementation of new rules, impacting the effectiveness of these critical protections.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Supreme Court Strikes At Federal Experts

18 July 2024

WASHINGTON – On June 28, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark decision that will drastically alter the government’s ability to enforce workplace safety, aviation standards, and commercial flight operations. This ruling, which ends the Chevron deference doctrine, hamstrings the efforts of agencies like OSHA, the FAA, and others to carry out their regulatory duties.

Chevron deference, established by a 1984 Supreme Court case, allowed courts to defer to federal agencies’ interpretations of ambiguous laws. This was crucial because judges and juries typically do not possess the same level of expertise as the specialists within these agencies. The doctrine enabled experts in various fields to use their knowledge to guide federal agencies and make binding decisions, leading to more informed and quicker regulatory outcomes. Removing Chevron deference means judges will now make binding decisions on subjects they may know very little about, which could lead to inconsistent and prolonged rulings.

For example, instead of deferring to OSHA’s requirements, a judge and jury might now decide if electric tugs are parked too close to a fire exit or if there are enough first aid kits. Similarly, decisions on whether to add or remove fire extinguishers or mandate CPR training could now be subject to court rulings. This could drag out many decisions for years and result in varied outcomes as different juries second-guess one another. If courts in different states reach conflicting rulings, it could create a fragmented regulatory environment, leading to significant uncertainty and challenges for businesses operating across state lines.

Virtually no one supports the end of regulatory oversight except massive corporations. Voters who have grown weary of perceived “over-regulation” of business will not see fewer regulations or rules governing workplace law in the United States. The same number of rules and regulations will still exist. The change is that individuals will need to hire lawyers and take corporations to court if they feel their workplace is unsafe or if workers are fired unfairly. They will no longer be able to rely on OSHA or the EEOC.

The tens of thousands of speedy, customized decisions that federal agencies make each year would be moved to the court system, swamping the non-specialized courts with longer and longer backlogs of cases. This is how regulations were implemented prior to Chevron. Chevron helped calm this chaos and preserved regular court structures for other types of cases.

What Was the Chevron Deference?

Chevron deference was a 40-year-old Supreme Court ruling that allowed government agencies to prioritize public safety and reasonable policy. On June 28, this ruling was overturned by a vote of 6-3.

Many may have never heard of Chevron deference. You might be wondering, “If I don’t even know what it is, why is its overturn such a big deal?”

In short, Chevron deference gave government agencies the liberty to interpret parts of laws passed by Congress that were unclear or ambiguous. It served as a foundation for many bureaucratic decisions that most of us took for granted. While it may not have been on our radars before due to the consistent nature of its application, we will definitely feel the impact of that consistency being upended. Some believe this change will be good, and some believe it will be bad, but experts agree that whatever happens, change will come.

The Impact of The SCOTUS Ruling

This ruling is predicted to impact bureaucratic agencies’ implementation of federal laws significantly. In the past, agencies consulted their own field experts when deciding how to carry out a vague congressional instruction.

However, now that Chevron deference has been overturned, a judge will decide how these laws will be carried out. While the agency will still be able to argue their expert opinions in court, they won’t have the final say on how these laws are implemented. Legal experts predict a large increase in the number of cases over regulatory policy, as this ruling will likely encourage corporations to dispute agency decisions.

The Supreme Court justices stated that the ruling will only affect future policy changes, so anything enacted before the ruling will remain unchanged. This gives companies some time to adjust their future plans to this change, as most organizations won’t feel the effects until a new policy is introduced.

Impact on OSHA

As a federal agency, OSHA is anticipated to be affected by this ruling in several ways. Passing any OSHA standard will take even longer than it already does (which is saying something).

The agency will want to avoid being taken to court and may spend more time and resources on avoiding expensive cases rather than carrying out policy in a timely manner. There is also a chance that these standards will be less effective, as congress members may intentionally write more specific laws to avoid court involvement in the legislation process.

These congress members are almost certainly not experts in the relevant fields. They will have to make their own assumptions on complex topics that they would have left to industry professionals in the past. Overall, we may see a decrease in federal workplace protections, which could impact employee safety and industry worker dynamics.

 

How These Changes Might Affect Your Workplace

If federal legal interpretations are taken out of OSHA’s hands, there may be unclear direction, leading to an increase in on-the-job employee injuries.

This does not mean, “Cancel your safety programs because nobody cares anymore.” Quite the opposite. Workers will still seek out workplaces that demonstrate they value employee safety. So, stay ahead of the curve and zero in on your hazard prevention plans.

Labor and Employment Attorneys Fisher Phillips said of the ruling, “Don’t forget about state and local laws. Even if a court interprets a federal statute in a way that helps smooth a path for you, there is no guarantee that state laws will follow suit. In fact, you may see some state lawmakers and regulators push for increased regulation given the softening that will soon exist at the federal level.”

Impact on Labor Unions and Workplace Safety

The end of Chevron deference could have major implications for labor unions and workplace safety regulations. Federal agencies like the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) often create rules that affect workers and employers. Without Chevron deference, these agencies may find it harder to implement new rules and enforce existing ones.

For labor unions, this change could mean a more challenging environment for advocating for workers’ rights. Agencies like the NLRB may face increased scrutiny when making decisions, potentially leading to fewer favorable rulings for unions. Similarly, OSHA’s efforts to ensure workplace safety could be hampered, as their regulations may be more frequently challenged in court.

Impact on Transportation

The transportation sector could also see substantial changes. The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are responsible for creating and enforcing many rules that ensure the safety and efficiency of the transportation system. With the end of Chevron deference, these agencies might struggle to defend their regulations in court.

For instance, new rules aimed at improving consumer protection, like fare transparency and passenger rights, could face more legal challenges. This shift may slow down the implementation of new safety standards in areas such as commercial spaceflight, maritime operations, and vehicle safety.

In short, the Supreme Court’s decision to end Chevron deference marks a major shift in how federal regulations are created and enforced. For labor unions, workplace safety, and transportation, this change could lead to more legal challenges and slower implementation of new rules, impacting the effectiveness of these critical protections.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Hurricane Beryl Assistance and Resources

Hurricane Beryl Assistance and Resources

Disaster Assistance Resources Available

July 15, 2024

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

Hurricane Beryl made landfall on Monday, July 8, 2024, near Matagorda, TX, about 100 miles from Houston, battering Southeast Texas with heavy rains and winds. The storm has caused widespread and ongoing power outages across the Texas Gulf Coast, leaving many of our union members and their families without electricity.

IAM District 141 leadership stands in solidarity with all union members impacted by this natural disaster. We are deeply concerned about your safety and well-being during this challenging time.

We are now processing requests for disaster assistance through the IAM Disaster Relief Fund. If you or a loved one have been affected by Hurricane Beryl and need assistance, please follow these steps to submit a claim:

1. Submit a Completed Claim Form
Within 30 days of the damage, submit a completed claim form. To get a form and for help filling it out, please contact your Assistant General Chair.

2. Required Information
Ensure your claim form includes the date of occurrence, ownership or rental status, primary or secondary residence, whether the dwelling is habitable, a description of damages, and photos or drawings illustrating the damages.

3. Review and Submission
Your Assistant General Chair will review your claim and ensure it is completed. They will then submit it on your behalf.

For detailed information and to access the necessary forms, please visit the 2024 IAM Disaster Relief Fund Website.

Please note that food losses due to power outages are not covered by the disaster relief program..

Additionally, if you require assistance with your job during this time, please reach out to your Union Stewards and Local Committees for support.

We are here to support you and your families as we work together to overcome the challenges posed by Hurricane Beryl.

In solidarity,

Mike Klemm
President/Directing General Chair
IAM District 141

EAP Contacts

Belinda Hawkins
Email: eapiambelinda@gmail.com
Phone: (832) 471-7477

Tony Rodriguez
EAP Chairman – United Airlines
Email: iameaptony@gmail.com
Phone: (303) 525-3334

Important Links and Resources

2024 IAM Disaster Relief Fund 

Veterans Disaster Assistance

UnionPlus Disaster Relief Grants

Salvation Army

Red Cross

United Way

Texas Division of Emergency Management

Please share these Ice, Food, and Water Distribution Centers. We will update as new places are identified. Click on the link below:

Ice, Food, and Water Distribution Centers

As always, those in need can also reach out to the Employee Assistance Program for more help. EAP services are free, confidential, compassionate, and available now.

For those who don’t need help, but who would like to give, please consider donating to the IAM Disaster Relief Fund. Every dollar helps.

 

Resources Available

FEMA.gov (www.fema.gov)

* Apply for assistance
* Local, State and National recovery resources
* 24/7 Counseling
* Multilingual Support
*Connect via Phone, social media, Text or the Mobile app

1 (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Disaster Shelters | Find Shelters | American Red Cross (www.redcross.org

* Temporary shelters
* 24/7 Counseling
* Call or text 1 (800) 985-5990

United Way 211 – 211 Site (211unitedway.org)
Call 2-1-1 or 1 (800) 543-7709

Text your zip code to 898-211

Food, Housing, Child Care, Mental Health, Financial, Utilities and many other forms of aid.

Location Search – The Salvation Army USA (www.salvationarmyusa.org)

  • Supplying food, water, shelter, and vital resources

1 (601) 969-6868

Need Housing Assistance? – HUD Exchange (www.hudexchange.info/housing-and-homeless-assistance/

Food banks, WIC, SNAP and other food assistance programs

Health and safety resources 

Disaster Relief Guides – IAMAW (goiam.org) 

United We Care (ual.com) (https://flyingtogether.ual.com/employee-services/unitedwecare)
Employee Relief Fund – Financial Assistance

Medicaid.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare | Medicaid (www.medicaid.gov)
How to sign up for, resources per State, State overviews
1 (877) 267-2323

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare | Medicare (www.medicare.gov)
How to sign up for, find health care providers, health & drug plans

1 (800) MEDICARE – 1 (800) 633-4227

 

United Negotiations Update

United Negotiations Update

United Contract Negotiations Update

02 July 2024

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

Last week, your IAM District 141 United Airlines Negotiating Committee, with your invaluable support, met with United Airlines management and began Section Six negotiations on the Fleet Service, Passenger Service, Storekeepers, Maintenance Instructors, Security Officers, Central Load Planners, and Fleet Technical Instructors and Related collective bargaining agreements (CBA).

The negotiations last week focused primarily on the Passenger Service contract. Much discussion took place regarding Agent on Demand (AOD), language interpreters, and temporary assignments. The temporary assignment discussions also pertained to the Fleet Service CBA.

No tentative agreements were reached. However, good, spirited dialogue was had and we hope to come to resolution regarding these important issues during our next negotiations session.

Negotiations will continue the week of 15 July, 2024 and we plan to continue our focus on these areas of Article One. We will also bring in the Fleet Technical Instructors and Related and our Central Load Planners sub-committees to begin Article One discussions on those two contracts.
We remain optimistic that we can reach tentative agreements by the end of the year or the first quarter of 2025, however, for this to happen,

United management must be serious and committed to providing us, the IAM members who have turned this airline around and have created one of the most profitable airlines in the world, the fair contract that we deserve.

Your unwavering support is appreciated and necessary to obtain the contract each and every IAM member employed by United Airlines deserves.

We will provide an update after our July negotiating session.

In solidarity,

Your Negotiating Committee
Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Jill Hazamy
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Terry Stansbury
Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G Klemm
President and Directing General Chair, 
District 141,
International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin Boards.

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

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Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

18 June 2024

WASHINGTON – The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue Airways, breaching U.S. aviation safety rules designed to protect U.S.-based carriers.

A code share agreement allows one airline to market and sell seats on a flight operated by another airline, effectively sharing the flight’s operations and marketing efforts. Both airlines began codesharing in April 2021, intending to offer more travel options between the United States and destinations in Asia and Africa.

The fine was imposed after Emirates operated flights carrying JetBlue’s designator code in regions where the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had imposed flight prohibitions for U.S. operators. These violations occurred between December 2021 and August 2022, during which Emirates flew over Iraqi airspace that the FAA had restricted for safety reasons. The FAA’s restrictions over Iraq were due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions, which posed risks to civil aviation, including potential miscalculation or misidentification of aircraft.

“The U.S. Department of Transportation today fined Emirates $1.8 million for operating flights carrying JetBlue Airways’ designator code in regions in which a Federal Aviation Administration flight prohibition was in effect for U.S. operators,” said the DOT in its statement. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate and engaged in passenger operations to and from the United States without the proper DOT authority.”

Between December 2021 and August 2022, Emirates operated 122 flights through Iraqi airspace below the U.S.-mandated minimum altitude of FL320. These flights were performed under JetBlue’s B6 flight designator. “By operating these flights in this manner, Emirates violated the conditions of its authority to operate,” the DOT stated.

The United Airlines Labor Coalition, including the Machinists Union, Transport Workers Union, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), and the Teamsters, also raised concerns regarding Emirates. They pointed to accounts of unfair labor practices and employee intimidation in the United Arab Emirates. In a letter, the coalition expressed their apprehension about the partnership between Emirates and U.S. airlines, highlighting the need for fair labor standards and respectful treatment of employees. The coalition’s statement reflects broader concerns within the aviation industry about labor relations and the impact of such partnerships on workers.

Responding to the ruling, Emirates said it planned to operate the 122 flights at or above FL320 but could not secure air traffic control (ATC) clearance for this flight level. The airline stated, “While these flights were operating, ATC did not give clearance to ascend to FL320, or had categorically instructed these flights to operate below FL320. Our pilots duly followed ATC instructions, a decision which is fully aligned with international aviation regulations.”

The DOT countered that Emirates “should have known” after the first few instances that local ATC might direct it to operate below FL320. “Emirates should and could have taken actions to avoid violating the condition of its codeshare statement of authorization but failed to do so,” the DOT said in its ruling.

The DOT stressed that the fine was for continuing to operate below FL320 and not for Emirates’ adherence to ATC instructions once in the air. After assessing all the evidence, the DOT concluded that enforcement action was warranted, particularly in light of the repeated violation.

“For the sake of the employees we represent, we sincerely hope for an improved climate, where cooperation and collaboration can exist and thrive,” said the union coalition leaders in a joint letter.

Emirates has agreed to the settlement, with $1.5 million payable within 60 days and the remaining $300,000 within one year.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

June Helping Hands – Sleep and Wellness

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EAP Peers:        This month we address sleep. Sleep and its relationship with mental health, in particular sleep and depression are discussed. How to improve sleep habits and some sleep facts are included on page 2.         Healthy sleep is one of the most important...

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

IAM141.org

LAS VEGAS – The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States. The three-day event, which runs until Thursday, aims to network, share ideas, and hone skills as the union enforces 14 separate contracts across eight major companies in the airline industry.

“Your diversity is your strength, but your solidarity is your power,” Machinists Legislative Director Hasan Solomon told the union members assembled. Solomon, recently named one of the Top 500 most influential people on Capitol Hill, was one of the notable speakers.

The event opened with remarks from District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm, who called the conference to order. “I want to express my deep gratitude and respect for the work our local grievance committees are doing on the front lines for our constituents,” Klemm stated. Vicky Schoening, President of Local Lodge 845 based in Las Vegas, also delivered opening remarks to the attendees representing workers at every major U.S. airport.

A key focus is the looming Section Six negotiations covering nearly 30,000 workers at United Airlines. President Klemm briefed the conference on the current state of labor in the airline industry as the union gears up for these pivotal contract talks. Other major topics included internal organizing, increasing union membership, and building solidarity.

Susie Martinez, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO, also delivered remarks.

While the agenda was jam-packed with leadership workshops and strategy sessions, the overall tone was one of determination and emphasis on union solidarity. With representatives from United, American, Hawaiian, Philippines, Spirit Airlines, SMX Cargo, and Flagship Janitorial Services in attendance, the conference allows these disparate workgroups to unite around shared goals.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related News

June Helping Hands – Sleep and Wellness

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EAP Peers:        This month we address sleep. Sleep and its relationship with mental health, in particular sleep and depression are discussed. How to improve sleep habits and some sleep facts are included on page 2.         Healthy sleep is one of the most important...

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...

Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

11June 2024

LAS VEGAS – The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States. The three-day event, which runs until Thursday, aims to network, share ideas, and hone skills as the union enforces 14 separate contracts across eight major companies in the airline industry.

“Your diversity is your strength, but your solidarity is your power,” Machinists Legislative Director Hasan Solomon told the union members assembled. Solomon, recently named one of the Top 500 most influential people on Capitol Hill, was one of the notable speakers.

The event opened with remarks from District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm, who called the conference to order. “I want to express my deep gratitude and respect for the work our local grievance committees are doing on the front lines for our constituents,” Klemm stated. Vicky Schoening, President of Local Lodge 845 based in Las Vegas, also delivered opening remarks to the attendees representing workers at every major U.S. airport.

A key focus is the looming Section Six negotiations covering nearly 30,000 workers at United Airlines. President Klemm briefed the conference on the current state of labor in the airline industry as the union gears up for these pivotal contract talks. Other major topics included internal organizing, increasing union membership, and building solidarity.

Susie Martinez, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO, also delivered remarks.

While the agenda was jam-packed with leadership workshops and strategy sessions, the overall tone was one of determination and emphasis on union solidarity. With representatives from United, American, Hawaiian, Philippines, Spirit Airlines, SMX Cargo, and Flagship Janitorial Services in attendance, the conference allows these disparate workgroups to unite around shared goals.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

Related

June Helping Hands – Sleep and Wellness

June Helping Hands – Sleep and Wellness

EAP Peers:        This month we address sleep. Sleep and its relationship with mental health, in particular sleep and depression are discussed. How to improve sleep habits and some sleep facts are included on page 2.         Healthy sleep is one of the most important...

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share Flights

Emirates Hit with $1.8 Million Fine for JetBlue Code Share FlightsWASHINGTON - The USDOT has fined Emirates Airlines $1.8 million for flying through prohibited airspace over Iraq at an unsafe altitude. The flights were part of a code share agreement with JetBlue...

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in Nevada

Unified Airline Workers Gather in NevadaLAS VEGAS - The 2024 Machinists Union District 141 Committee Conference kicked off today in Las Vegas, bringing together over 200 union activists, leaders, and grievance committee members from across the United States.Unified...