Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

IAM141.org

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

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Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Unruly Woman Fined $40,000

16 November 2023

PHOENIX – Cayla Farris, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Phoenix to Honolulu on February 13, 2022, has been ordered by United States District Judge Susan M. Brnovich to pay $38,952 in restitution to the airline. Farris, who pleaded guilty to interfering with a flight crew member, exhibited unruly behavior that included using profanity and threatening the crew and other passengers. Her actions led to significant delays and disruptions, including the flight’s return to Phoenix and the rerouting of several other flights.

The investigation, conducted by the FBI and the Phoenix Police Department, highlighted the severity of the incident, which was part of a broader trend of increased unruly passenger incidents during the pandemic. In 2021, nearly 6,000 such incidents were reported, a stark increase from the approximately 1,100 incidents in 2019. Though these numbers have declined, they remain higher than pre-pandemic levels.

As part of her sentence, Farris served 3.6 months in prison and is now under three years of supervised release. During this time, she is prohibited from traveling on commercial aircraft without prior authorization. This case underscores the government’s heightened efforts to combat air rage incidents and enforce federal laws requiring passengers to comply with crewmember instructions.

Experts note that cramped and stressful flight conditions often lead to disruptive behavior. This case serves as a reminder of the legal consequences of such actions and the importance of maintaining a safe and orderly environment on commercial flights.

While Cayla Farris faced a substantial $40,000 fine for her disruptive behavior on an American Airlines flight, this isn’t the heftiest penalty the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued since the pandemic. An earlier incident in July 2021 resulted in an even larger fine. In that case, a woman on a flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Charlotte was fined $81,950 for physically assaulting a flight attendant and attempting to open the cabin door.

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More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

More Info About the ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

“The Full Story Behind the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident”

IAM141.org

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

 

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

 

Your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has your back.

Navigating life’s challenges, from mental health struggles to substance abuse, becomes easier with our dedicated EAP. As valued union members, you’re entitled to free, confidential, and compassionate support. Beyond personal care, we help demystify insurance and company policies, ensuring you access the best care possible. Remember, your well-being is our priority. Reach out to EAP whenever you need; we’re here to guide and stand by you.

Help can start today: CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

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Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the Machinists Union

More Info About the Viral ‘That MF’s Not Real’ Airplane Incident

August 8, 2023

By now, everyone in the airline industry knows about the “That MF’s Not Real” Incident that happened on a 2 July American Airlines flight headed to Orlando from Fort Worth.

Here’s a recap:

The Dallas Airport Police have now made public the report filed after the meltdown, revealing more of the story. 

The woman experiencing the mental health crisis is 38-year-old Tiffany Gomas, a marketing executive and head of Uppercut Marketing. According to a now-removed LinkedIn page, Gomas is a “Top-performing sales leader, Fortune 50 Account Manager & Project Management Executive.”

The meltdown was filmed by several passengers on American Airlines flight 1009 from Fort Worth, some of which have been viewed millions of times. One of the passengers aboard the flight was comedian Carrot Top, who also posted his commentary about the incident on one of his social media accounts.

In the video, Gomez says, “I’m telling you, I’m getting the f*** off, and there’s a reason why I’m getting the f*** off and everyone can either believe it or they can not believe it.”

“I don’t give two f****, but I am telling you right now – that m*****f***** back there is NOT real,” she continued, pointing toward the back of the airplane. “And you can sit on this plane and you can die with them or not. I’m not going to.”

The police report says two officers responded to the disturbance to find Gomas standing in the jet bridge. However, she refused to speak to officers and left the area. 

The report indicates that Gomas seemed very upset, tearfully stating the flight wouldn’t safely reach Florida. The officer informed her she couldn’t board the plane and issued her a trespass notice before escorting her out of the secure areas of the airport. 

She has removed her presence from social media platforms, with her Facebook and Pinterest accounts no longer available. Additionally, her Instagram profile has been set to private.

Gomas told police the incident “was sparked by an argument over wireless headphones.”

A report by journalist Bree Dail says that an American Airlines supervisor said, “The female passenger was arguing with a family accusing them of stealing her air pods. The female then started claiming that the aircraft was not safe and did not want the aircraft to leave due to her believing it would not make it to its destination.” A report by the Daily Mail claims her home is valued at around $2 million.

Despite having her ticket revoked, she later returned to TSA and cleared screening before being escorted out of the secured areas a second time. According to the police report, she could pass TSA screening because her boarding pass was still showing as valid in the TSA database. Since she technically cleared all the steps of the screening process, no breach of security occurred. 

Your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has your back.

Navigating life’s challenges, from mental health struggles to substance abuse, becomes easier with our dedicated EAP. As valued union members, you’re entitled to free, confidential, and compassionate support. Beyond personal care, an EAP Representative can help demystify insurance and company policies, ensuring you access the best care possible. Remember, your well-being is our priority. Reach out to EAP whenever you need; we’re here to guide and stand by you.

Help can start today: CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

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Two Machinists Union Members Graduate Thanks to IAM-SUNY Empire State College Partnership

Two Machinists Union Members Graduate Thanks to IAM-SUNY Empire State College Partnership

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Two Machinists Union Members Graduate Thanks to IAM-SUNY Empire State College Partnership

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Two Machinists Union members have successfully completed the bachelor’s degree program in Labor Studies through the IAM’s partnership with the State University of New York’s Empire State College (ESC).

Many thanks to the Machinists & Aerospace journalists at GOIAM.org who wrote and originally published this story. 

Since 2014, the IAM has partnered with ESC to offer associates and bachelor’s degrees in labor studies through the Harry Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City. The partnership also offers a master’s degree in work and labor policy. Degree programs are conducted online, with week-long residencies that occur once a semester at the IAM’s William W. Winpisinger Education and Technology Center in Hollywood, MD.

Midwest Territory Grand Lodge Representative Rick Mickschl graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of science in labor studies, and Matthew Hanson, a Seattle IAM Local 289 member, graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of arts in labor studies.

“Congratulations to Grand Lodge Representative Rick Mickschl,” said IAM Midwest Territory General Vice President Steve Galloway. “Educating our staff, officers, members and activists is the IAM’s top priority. We are proud of all this year’s graduates.”

“Congratulations to our graduates,” said IAM Western Territory General Vice President Gary R. Allen. “As union leaders, it is our calling to continue to grow and learn to enhance our union and our communities.”

“This program makes higher education possible for working families,” said IAM International President Robert Martinez Jr. “Equipping activists and leaders with tools and knowledge is one of the ways we strengthen the IAM for the future. My sincere thanks and congratulations go to Brothers Mickschl and Hanson for their hard work and dedication in serving our members and the IAM.” 

“This is truly a great day for these two members and the IAM-ESC partnership,” said Douglas Williams, IAM-ESC Partnership Coordinator. “I have watched Rick and Matthew dedicate themselves to their studies with the same diligence that they have applied to their union work, and I could not be prouder that they have completed this program with the highest distinction.” 

If you are an IAM member, retiree or relative, you can go to college, free of charge, and you can learn more about the program here. You can also reach out to Douglas Williams, IAM-ESC Partnership Coordinator, at dwilliams@iamaw.org.

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Machinists Strength on Display for Transportation Workers

Machinists Strength on Display for Transportation Workers

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Machinists Strength on Display for Transportation Workers

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Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, our lives as a country and a union have adjusted on the fly to a new way of living. Each day seems to bring a new experience as we’ve grown accustomed to having the unpredictable be the norm.

Many thanks to the Machinists & Aerospace journalists at GOIAM.org who wrote and originally published this story. 

The one constant in our lives is the support Machinists have given fellow Machinists.

The IAM membership and our Political and Legislative Department immediately responded to the unprecedented global economic collapse and societal constraints by engaging in an intense lobbying effort to lead the labor movement’s quest to have the airline Payroll Support Program (PSP) included in the CARES Act.

Machinists from every territory and job classification banded together and made tens of thousands of calls and wrote thousands of letters to their Senators and Representatives, imploring them to provide relief for America’s frontline workers. Through this collective effort, the Machinists were able to have the Payroll Support Program (PSP) included in the CARES Act.

Airline employees continued to work and receive salaries and benefits along with the condition that collective bargaining agreements would be honored and carriers would not be allowed to invoke involuntary furloughs.

“I was thrilled with the passing of PSP,” said Southwest Airlines Customer Service Representative Judy Leckie. “After being with Southwest Airlines for 33 years and so close to retirement, I was devastated when I received my warning letter. Because of all the lobbying my Brothers and Sisters at the IAM did, I never missed a day of work. I am grateful to be a part of a union with members who always fight for each other.”

While many members with decades of service, like Leckie, were emotionally affected by the uncertainty of possibly not being able to retire on their own terms, there was also another group who were just beginning their careers who were in a more tenuous predicament during the outbreak of the pandemic.

“As someone newly hired by American Airlines as the pandemic took full effect last year, I have a slightly different story than most of the senior IAM members,” said Charlotte Local Lodge 1725 Fleet Service worker Nathaniel Fink. “For starters, I was in training doing the usual 40-hour per week class, and being on probation, I was uncertain if the company would terminate me and the rest of the class. That’s when I realized how important it was to be a member of the IAM.

“Our union and my reps fought around the clock to ensure that we would not be laid off and continue working part-time, added Fink. “They even worked with the company to adjust our schedules so we could work our allotted 15 hours per week over three days instead of working three hours a day over five days. This helped me a lot with my travel.”

Rail employees were granted a waiver of waiting periods for benefits and enhanced unemployment benefits under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act.

More Lobbying Work Needed

While securing the PSP granted much-needed economic relief for airline and rail employees through September 2020, another round of stimulus relief was needed when our air and rail sectors didn’t rebound before the CARES Act expired.

Machinists again were at the forefront of the fight on Capitol Hill. We responded and after weeks of intense lobbying, secured a clean extension of the critical PSP through March 31, 2021. 

This clean extension again prohibited any airline accepting additional PSP funds from involuntarily furloughing employees for the duration of the program. It also required participating airlines to recall the tens of thousands of airline employees furloughed following the expiration of the original PSP program on September 30, 2020.

“Without my IAM Brothers and Sisters fighting relentlessly for each other and the Legislative team’s work on Capitol Hill, my family and I would have exhausted most of our savings while I waited to be recalled,” said Local Lodge 2559 American Airlines Mechanic Chuck Cox. “I, like many others in my position, were able to overcome and limit any hardships because the IAM has an army of Machinists willing to battle for one another and iron-clad contacts that protect us in good and bad times.”

The legislation mandated an extension and enhancement of unemployment benefits for railroad employees, plus an extension of waiver of the 7-day waiting period. Amtrak was also restricted from furloughing additional employees. The passenger rail carrier is also required to recall workers to their former position when rail service is restored and prevents Amtrak from contracting out the work of furloughed employees.

 In March, Congress passed the American Rescue Plan Act, a $1.9 trillion bill which provided $14 billion in additional aid to the airline industry, including an extension of the Payroll Support Program (PSP). The PSP, extended for a second time since the initial passage of the CARES Act in late March 2020, mandated that as a condition of accepting tax payer funded aid, air carriers will not be permitted to lay off any workers through September 30, 2021.

“Over the last year, I had a lot of anxiety from receiving warning letters and, obviously, about my job security,” said Fink. “But through it all, I had my union fighting for me and everyone else at the IAM. I couldn’t be more appreciative of Shop Steward Allen Drennen and District Lodge 141 for everything they did for me.”

The Act also provides $30.5 billion in emergency aid for the passenger rail and transit sectors. Amtrak received $1.7 billion and is required to recall laid-off workers. The emergency funds will be distributed across the country and act as a lifeline for essential workers in the rail and transit sectors.

“Thanks to the efforts of IAM members and our Legislative team, we have led the fight on Capitol Hill from the beginning and made sure that the Machinists’ family will always look out for the welfare of one another,” added Chuck Cox.

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141 Report: Local 1886 Golf, Smoke, BBQ Events Support GDA

141 Report: Local 1886 Golf, Smoke, BBQ Events Support GDA

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After a one-year hiatus, Local 1886 held their 5th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit Guide Dogs of America and Tender Loving Canines on June 25. Golfers were eager to sign up, and the event sold out in 6 weeks.

141 Report: Local 1886 Golf, Smoke, BBQ Events Support GDA

Dave welcomes back John Martinez, President of Local Lodge 1886 in Denver, Colorado, to talk about their most successful charity golf tournament ever. Has your local lodge considered organizing a charity event? Watch this video!

After a one-year hiatus, Local 1886 held their 5th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit Guide Dogs of America and Tender Loving Canines on June 25. Golfers were eager to sign up, and the event sold out in 6 weeks.

Brother John Martinez shares the planning process and gives a step-by-step timeline and organizing tips on putting together a big event for charity. He stresses the importance of starting early, at least six months in advance, to line up sponsors and get the word out. John and his team of volunteers led by Rich Pijanowski, Frank Gagliano, and Ken Cardoso began meeting via Zoom in November 2020, unsure about whether they could resume their annual event.

They received an enthusiastic response to their initial solicitation for sponsors. The early start paid off: they collected over 140 gift donations for raffles and cash to underwrite the event’s costs. 

With 144 golfers signed up to play and the main event sold out, event organizers scheduled a BBQ lunch at the airport to raise funds a week before the golf tournament. Volunteers donated all the food and supplies, allowing members to show off their cooking and smoking talents. That event also raised awareness about the extraordinary work GDA does and the vital role the Machinists Union plays in their support. 

As expected, the food sold out quickly. “We didn’t realize how hungry ramp service, flight attendants, and customer service people could be,” said John, pledging that the Smoke and BBQ lunch would also become an annual event. 

After covering all costs, Local 1886 presented $17,000 to Guide Dogs of America and Tender Loving Canines, the largest donation in the local’s history.

John and the team of volunteers are not resting and look forward to repeating their success next year. Save the date for the 6th Annual Local 1886 Charity Golf Tournament on June 24, 2022. 

“United Next” Will Build a Bigger United and a Stronger IAM

“United Next” Will Build a Bigger United and a Stronger IAM

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United is placing the biggest new aircraft order in its history, a total of 200 MAX jets from Boeing plus 70 aircraft from Airbus, and will hire 25,000 new employees in the next 5 years to support that investment in their fleet.

Read the Official Announcement

25,000 New Hires, 500 New Planes.

“United Next” Will Build a Bigger United and a Stronger IAM

United’s CEO went on a media blitz this week with bullish news on how he wants to direct the airline post-pandemic.  

Scott Kirby began his day on Tuesday with early morning interviews on CNBC and other news outlets, before he joined members of his executive suite at Hangar 54 at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey for twin live presentations. The first event was reserved for VIPs and media, while the second had an in-person audience of United employees and was also live-streamed on the airline’s intranet. Admission to both events was by invitation only.  

As the temperature in Newark hit 100 degrees Fahrenheit at noon, Kirby shed his suit jacket to share the good news: United is placing the biggest new aircraft order in its history, a total of 200 MAX jets from Boeing plus 70 aircraft from Airbus, and will hire 25,000 new employees in the next 5 years to support that investment in their fleet. The news was welcomed by representatives of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers at both United and Boeing. The IAM represents 28,000 airport and call center workers at United, the largest group of unionized workers at the carrier. The union also has 30,000 members at the Boeing Renton, Washington facility where the MAX aircraft are made.  

Assistant General Chairs Mitch Buckley and Erik Stenberg represented District 141 at the events. Buckley joined representatives from 4 labor unions on the stage during the live stream where Kirby thanked them for the important role organized labor played in the airline’s quick return to profitability as the country rises from the coronavirus pandemic. After losing $7 million last year, Kirby announced separately on Monday he expects the company to show a pre-tax earnings profit in July 2021. 

Kirby praised the decisions of his team, specifically that of grounding fewer aircraft than other major carriers in the Spring of 2020, which facilitated the return to flying to fit demand when markets opened and customers returned when vaccines became widely available this year. All labor unions at United lobbied Congress and got $54 billion in federal payroll support for US airlines in exchange for keeping workers employed and receiving benefits such as health insurance during the pandemic. Throughout 2020, thousands of airline workers also accepted early retirement packages or took voluntary leaves of absence, saving companies millions in payroll.

Jon Roitman, United’s Chief Operating Officer, wore a safety vest as he answered a question about the job security of employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements when the Payroll Support Program expires in September. “It remains to be seen,” said Roitman, pointing out that the airline is still “reconciling” what resources would be needed, and their timing.

District 141 stood firm and defended every clause in our contracts during the worst crisis in the history of commercial aviation, and sued United in federal court to stop the involuntary downgrade of thousands of workers to part-time status. Every IAM member at United enjoys peace of mind knowing their livelihood will be protected by a legally binding contract even after the expiration of the Payroll Support Program. 

The positive news set the stage for a successful post-pandemic United, which made District 141 members and leadership look to brighter days ahead. AGC Mitch Buckley said, “This is very exciting, especially for our members at EWR,” pointing out how the “United Next” plan calls for significant growth in that hub city. For AGC and District 141 Safety Chair Erik Stenberg, the most important part of the plan is how “Our members will have great opportunities at United Airlines.” 

Carmelo Benedicto, a United Lead Ramp Services Agent at EWR who is an active member and Organizer at Local 914 said, “It will be great to go into negotiations with a company that’s not broke.”