Honoring the Fallen, Protecting the Living

Honoring the Fallen, Protecting the Living

Honoring the Fallen, Protecting the Living

Honoring the Fallen, Protecting the Living

IAM141.org

On April 28, the Machinists Union gathered to honor workers lost to preventable accidents on Workers Memorial Day, pledging to continue the fight for safer working conditions.

Workers Memorial Day serves as a poignant reminder of the lives lost to workplace hazards and the need for better safety standards. Among those remembered was Albert Williams, a highly respected ramp agent at United Airlines, who tragically suffered a severe health crisis while at work and passed away in August 2022. A dedicated union representative, he was deeply involved in community service events through Houston’s Local Lodge 811, where he also served as an auditor. Born in Louisiana, Williams was a devoted father and avid LSU football fan.

Although he never got to see his sons reach their college football dreams, he would have been proud. AJ, his younger son, won a football scholarship, and is now a freshman at Mary-Harden Baylor. His elder son, Zion Williams, is close to graduating from the University of Houston.  His daughter, Jaden, is a medical assistant in the Dallas area. Williams had been married to his wife Jaha for 20 years before his untimely passing.

Albert was among the workers honored at this year’s ceremony. 

“Despite all of our progress, we are still reminded every year of the dangerous nature of our work,” emphasized IAM International President Brian Bryant. “We are reminded that it is our union’s most sacred duty to ensure our members’ safety.”

The ceremony was held at the IAM William W. Winpisinger Education and Technology Center at Workers’ Memorial Park. It brought together union members and leaders to honor workers who lost their lives due to preventable workplace injuries and illnesses. The event emphasized the importance of continuing to advocate for strong safety standards in workplaces across the country. A wreath was laid at the memorial to pay tribute to those who had passed, and attendees observed a moment of silence in their honor.

Brian Bryant and Michael Oathout, IAM Safety and Health Director, delivered remarks urging members to hold employers accountable and fight for safe working conditions. Oathout stated, “We must continue to bond together to keep our families, coworkers, and neighbors safe. We must hold employers accountable to keep workers safe. We must fight to protect our fundamental right to a safe job.” The ceremony served as a powerful reminder of the human cost of unsafe workplaces and the need for continued vigilance in protecting workers’ rights to a safe job.

Recent statistics on workplace fatalities emphasize the urgency of this cause. In 2022, workplace fatalities rose by 5.7%, resulting in 5,486 deaths, with transportation incidents being the leading cause, accounting for 37.7% of all deaths. Violence-related deaths also saw an increase of 11.6%, underscoring the range of risks that workers face. Workers in transportation and material moving occupations experienced the highest number of fatalities, followed by construction workers. Additionally, significant disparities were found in fatality rates among different demographics, particularly Black or African American and Hispanic or Latino workers.

These statistics highlight the critical importance of workplace safety initiatives and reinforce the need for stronger regulations to prevent these preventable tragedies.

To watch the ceremony, click here. To view the full photo gallery, click here.

Fallen Members: 18
Frederick M. Anderson, Jr. – TCU/IAM Local 6334
James Balk – IAM Local 2777
Albert Banks Sr. – IAM Local 1445
Matthew Carter – IAM Local 4 
Derek James Etzcorn – IAM Local 1635
Bryan Fleigle – IAM Local 175
Daniel Fumar – IAM Local 1781
Sandra Grosberger – IAM Local 175
John Hammerbacker Jr. – IAM Local 175
Sherri Harrison – IAM Local 175
Devvin Patrick Hasson – TCU/IAM Local 6004
Otha “Jay” Jones Jr. – IAM Local 2003
Kevin Lamond – IAM Local 175
Robert “Jeff” Moore – IAM Local 18
Robert H. Skinner – IAM Local 18
Christina Smith – IAM Local 1635
Danny Suafoa – IAM Local 2202/District 142
Terry Trowbridge – IAM Local 175 

Special Remembrances: 11
Retired Business Rep for IAM Local 1769/District 75 – Charles Cooper Jr.
Retired IAM Local 2003 Member – Carl “CT”  Dean
Retired GST Special Assistant – Steven Dunn
Retired Railroad Coordinator/General Chair – Mark “Flip” Filipovic
Grand Lodge Auditor – Michael Gonzales
Retired Western Territory Chief of Staff – Robert Gregory
Retired Director of Legislative and MNPL – William Holayter
Retired IAM Local 1125 Life Member – Wayne Ihrig
Retired Headquarters Resident General Vice President – George Poulin 
Retired Grand Lodge Representative – Jack Sams
Retired IAM Local  777 Member – Terry R. Sutton

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Honoring the Fallen, Protecting the Living

3 May 2024

On April 28, the Machinists Union gathered to honor workers lost to preventable accidents on Workers Memorial Day, pledging to continue the fight for safer working conditions.

Workers Memorial Day serves as a poignant reminder of the lives lost to workplace hazards and the need for better safety standards. Among those remembered was Albert Williams, a highly respected ramp agent at United Airlines, who tragically suffered a severe health crisis while at work and passed away in August 2022. A dedicated union representative, he was deeply involved in community service events through Houston’s Local Lodge 811, where he also served as an auditor. Born in Louisiana, Williams was a devoted father and avid LSU football fan.

Although he never got to see his sons reach their college football dreams, he would have been proud. AJ, his younger son, won a football scholarship, and is now a freshman at Mary-Harden Baylor. His elder son, Zion Williams, is close to graduating from the University of Houston.  His daughter, Jaden, is a medical assistant in the Dallas area. Williams had been married to his wife Jaha for 20 years before his untimely passing.

Albert was among the workers honored at this year’s ceremony.

“Despite all of our progress, we are still reminded every year of the dangerous nature of our work,” emphasized IAM International President Brian Bryant. “We are reminded that it is our union’s most sacred duty to ensure our members’ safety.”

The ceremony was held at the IAM William W. Winpisinger Education and Technology Center at Workers’ Memorial Park. It brought together union members and leaders to honor workers who lost their lives due to preventable workplace injuries and illnesses. The event emphasized the importance of continuing to advocate for strong safety standards in workplaces across the country. A wreath was laid at the memorial to pay tribute to those who had passed, and attendees observed a moment of silence in their honor.

Brian Bryant and Michael Oathout, IAM Safety and Health Director, delivered remarks urging members to hold employers accountable and fight for safe working conditions. Oathout stated, “We must continue to bond together to keep our families, coworkers, and neighbors safe. We must hold employers accountable to keep workers safe. We must fight to protect our fundamental right to a safe job.” The ceremony served as a powerful reminder of the human cost of unsafe workplaces and the need for continued vigilance in protecting workers’ rights to a safe job.

Recent statistics on workplace fatalities emphasize the urgency of this cause. In 2022, workplace fatalities rose by 5.7%, resulting in 5,486 deaths, with transportation incidents being the leading cause, accounting for 37.7% of all deaths. Violence-related deaths also saw an increase of 11.6%, underscoring the range of risks that workers face. Workers in transportation and material moving occupations experienced the highest number of fatalities, followed by construction workers. Additionally, significant disparities were found in fatality rates among different demographics, particularly Black or African American and Hispanic or Latino workers.

These statistics highlight the critical importance of workplace safety initiatives and reinforce the need for stronger regulations to prevent these preventable tragedies.

To watch the ceremony, click here. To view the full photo gallery, click here.

Fallen Members: 18
Frederick M. Anderson, Jr. – TCU/IAM Local 6334
James Balk – IAM Local 2777
Albert Banks Sr. – IAM Local 1445
Matthew Carter – IAM Local 4 
Derek James Etzcorn – IAM Local 1635
Bryan Fleigle – IAM Local 175
Daniel Fumar – IAM Local 1781
Sandra Grosberger – IAM Local 175
John Hammerbacker Jr. – IAM Local 175
Sherri Harrison – IAM Local 175
Devvin Patrick Hasson – TCU/IAM Local 6004
Otha “Jay” Jones Jr. – IAM Local 2003
Kevin Lamond – IAM Local 175
Robert “Jeff” Moore – IAM Local 18
Robert H. Skinner – IAM Local 18
Christina Smith – IAM Local 1635
Danny Suafoa – IAM Local 2202/District 142
Terry Trowbridge – IAM Local 175 

Special Remembrances: 11
Retired Business Rep for IAM Local 1769/District 75 – Charles Cooper Jr.
Retired IAM Local 2003 Member – Carl “CT”  Dean
Retired GST Special Assistant – Steven Dunn
Retired Railroad Coordinator/General Chair – Mark “Flip” Filipovic
Grand Lodge Auditor – Michael Gonzales
Retired Western Territory Chief of Staff – Robert Gregory
Retired Director of Legislative and MNPL – William Holayter
Retired IAM Local 1125 Life Member – Wayne Ihrig
Retired Headquarters Resident General Vice President – George Poulin 
Retired Grand Lodge Representative – Jack Sams
Retired IAM Local  777 Member – Terry R. Sutton

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New DOT Rules Promise to Make Air Travel Less Horrible

New DOT Rules Promise to Make Air Travel Less Horrible

New DOT Rules Promise to Make Air Travel Less Horrible

IAM141.org

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Transportation, led by Secretary Pete Buttigieg, announced sweeping new regulations on Wednesday, requiring airlines to offer automatic cash refunds for significant delays and cancellations, marking a major shift towards enhanced passenger rights.

“Passengers deserve to get their money back when an airline owes them – without headaches or haggling,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. “Our new rule sets a new standard to require airlines to promptly provide cash refunds to their passengers.”

Currently, airlines can offer passengers non-monetary refunds, such as free miles, for things like flight cancellations, delayed baggage, and poor Wi-Fi connections. The new rules will require airlines to refund the money passengers have paid for these services without requiring those passengers to ask for cash refunds.

“Airlines must automatically issue refunds without passengers having to explicitly request them or jump through hoops,” stated Secretary Buttigieg, emphasizing the new mandate to simplify and ensure fairness in the refund process.

“Up until now, even though technically you’re already supposed to be able to get your money back for cancellation, you have to really fight for it,” Buttigieg said about the new rules. “A lot of times, what the airline would do is they’d say, ‘OK, well, here’s 5,000 miles,’ and that might sound great if you’re not aware that 5,000 miles is worth, say, $50 and you’re actually entitled to 400 bucks in a ticket refund,” Secretary Buttigieg explained.

The new rules will also eliminate the frustration of hidden and surprise fees by requiring airlines to disclose all costs upfront during the booking process. This transparency ensures that passengers can make informed decisions about their travel options, free from unexpected charges at the time of purchase or check-in.

“Today’s announcements will require airlines to both provide passengers better information about costs before ticket purchase, and promptly provide cash refunds to passengers when they are owed — not only saving passengers time and money, but also preventing headaches,” Buttigieg said.

Machinists Union District Legislative Director David Roderick expressed strong support for the new regulations, noting their broader impact on the industry and workforce. “These regulations are a win-win for everyone involved,” Roderick said. “Better treatment of passengers directly contributes to more profitable airlines, which translates to more good-paying union jobs. This is exactly the kind of legislation our members should champion.”

Since 2021, the Department of Transportation has implemented several sweeping new airline regulations aimed at protecting the flying public. Under Secretary Pete Buttigieg, the DOT has advanced the largest expansion of airline passenger rights, issued record fines, and returned more money to passengers than ever before.

Thanks to initiatives imposed by the Department of Transportation, all major U.S. airlines now guarantee free rebooking and meals, with most offering hotel accommodations for significant delays. These guarantees are all enforceable by the DOT. 

In 2023, the U.S. achieved a record-low flight cancellation rate of under 1.2% despite high travel volumes. DOT is also reviewing airline privacy practices and loyalty programs aimed at further expanding passenger rights and transparency.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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New DOT Rules Promise to Make Air Travel Less Horrible

25 April 2024

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Transportation, led by Secretary Pete Buttigieg, announced sweeping new regulations on Wednesday, requiring airlines to offer automatic cash refunds for significant delays and cancellations, marking a major shift towards enhanced passenger rights.

“Passengers deserve to get their money back when an airline owes them – without headaches or haggling,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. “Our new rule sets a new standard to require airlines to promptly provide cash refunds to their passengers.”

Currently, airlines can offer passengers non-monetary refunds, such as free miles, for things like flight cancellations, delayed baggage, and poor Wi-Fi connections. The new rules will require airlines to refund the money passengers have paid for these services without requiring those passengers to ask for cash refunds.

“Airlines must automatically issue refunds without passengers having to explicitly request them or jump through hoops,” stated Secretary Buttigieg, emphasizing the new mandate to simplify and ensure fairness in the refund process.

“Up until now, even though technically you’re already supposed to be able to get your money back for cancellation, you have to really fight for it,” Buttigieg said about the new rules. “A lot of times, what the airline would do is they’d say, ‘OK, well, here’s 5,000 miles,’ and that might sound great if you’re not aware that 5,000 miles is worth, say, $50 and you’re actually entitled to 400 bucks in a ticket refund,” Secretary Buttigieg explained.

The new rules will also eliminate the frustration of hidden and surprise fees by requiring airlines to disclose all costs upfront during the booking process. This transparency ensures that passengers can make informed decisions about their travel options, free from unexpected charges at the time of purchase or check-in.

“Today’s announcements will require airlines to both provide passengers better information about costs before ticket purchase, and promptly provide cash refunds to passengers when they are owed — not only saving passengers time and money, but also preventing headaches,” Buttigieg said.

Machinists Union District Legislative Director David Roderick expressed strong support for the new regulations, noting their broader impact on the industry and workforce. “These regulations are a win-win for everyone involved,” Roderick said. “Better treatment of passengers directly contributes to more profitable airlines, which translates to more good-paying union jobs. This is exactly the kind of legislation our members should champion.”

Since 2021, the Department of Transportation has implemented several sweeping new airline regulations aimed at protecting the flying public. Under Secretary Pete Buttigieg, the DOT has advanced the largest expansion of airline passenger rights, issued record fines, and returned more money to passengers than ever before.

Thanks to initiatives imposed by the Department of Transportation, all major U.S. airlines now guarantee free rebooking and meals, with most offering hotel accommodations for significant delays. These guarantees are all enforceable by the DOT. 

In 2023, the U.S. achieved a record-low flight cancellation rate of under 1.2% despite high travel volumes. DOT is also reviewing airline privacy practices and loyalty programs aimed at further expanding passenger rights and transparency.

We have a quick favor to ask. If only 10% of union members sign up for regular donations to support important legislative and regulatory goals like this, we can put airline workers front and center on Capitol Hill. Becoming a recurring donor is more than a contribution—it’s a commitment to our cause and a testament to the power of collective action. Every donation helps, no matter the size.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

IAM141.org

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

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American Airlines Union Members Launch Pre-Negotiation Surveys

3 April 2024

Union members at American Airlines, including thousands of workers in the Fleet Service workgroup, are gearing up to start contract negotiations in the upcoming months, according to a joint statement released on April 1 by the Transport Workers Union and the Machinists Union.

Front-line union members of the Fleet Service workers at American Airlines are taking the lead in kicking off the new round of negotiations, set to begin in September of this year. They are sharing their main issues and concerns through surveys conducted by the two unions. These surveys are available to front-line union members starting April 1 and will run through April 19.

According to a joint statement released to union members this morning, “The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with American Airlines.”

Fleet Service Workers at American are represented by two separate unions, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and the Machinists Union (IAM). This partnership was forged in 2013 following the merger between American Airlines, and US Airways. Together the two unions represent about 30,000 workers from various workgroups at American.

The current contract was drafted after four years of bargaining at the airline. The TWU-IAM Association announced in January 2020 that they had reached Agreements in Principle with American Airlines for five new Joint Collective Bargaining Agreements (JCBAs) worth $4.2 billion. Fleet Service workers won top-of-industry wage increases, profit-sharing payments, and critical quality-of-life improvements. Importantly, union members also negotiated bullet-proof job protections, which other airlines have been required to match in order to stay competitive in the tightening airline job market.

Airlines are covered under the Railway Labor Act, which covers transportation-related industries. Under the Act, agreements between airlines and unions do not expire. Instead, they reach an “amendable date,” after which they can be updated. At airlines, this process can be lengthy and often takes several years to complete. The four years it took for American Airlines to agree to the current contract was similar in terms of timeframe to other airline contracts. Pilots at United Airlines, for example, also took a little over four years to reach an agreement with that airline.

 

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Machinist Union Members at United Begin Preparations for New Contract Talks

Machinist Union Members at United Begin Preparations for New Contract Talks

Machinist Union Members at United Begin Preparations for New Contract Talks

Machinist Union Members at United Begin Preparations for New Contract Talks

IAM141.org

Union members at United Airlines, including nearly 29,000 workers over seven different workgroups, are preparing to start contract negotiations as soon as this summer, according to an announcement made on Friday by the Union’s District President, Mike Klemm.

According to Klemm, the seven agreements between the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and United Airlines will become eligible for updates on May 1. Thanks to an early start provision in the 2023 agreements, this will be the second round of contract talks between the union and the carrier in as many years.

In 2023, the Machinists Union negotiated industry-leading wages and job protections, with thousands of union members earning more than $37 an hour. They also extended critical job protections for hundreds of employees at airports where United had a smaller footprint, who might have otherwise faced the possibility of being outsourced. The 2023 agreements also insourced several stations, including Miami and Colorado Springs.

In 2023, the Airline committed to “Expedited Negotations,” which would have focused on only the top concerns of union members. The hope was that the talks would bring meaningful job improvements to covered workers quickly, within a few months. However, the Airline proved unable to fulfill that commitment, and talks stalled.

Under the Railway Labor Act, the governing body that oversees labor relations in transportation industries, including airlines, the failure of United to quickly seal a deal with the union meant that the two parties would enter into “Section 6” negotiations instead. Section 6 Negotiations, named after Section 6 of the Railway Labor Act, will require the parties to litigate every aspect of the collective bargaining agreements and are likely to take as long as a year or more to negotiate.

President Klemm warned that the track record of United Airlines’ inability to swiftly cement collective Bargaining Agreements might result in delays in the new round of negotiations.

“It’s essential to recognize the changing dynamics at United Airlines,” he said in a written statement to union members. “This is not the same airline as it was from 2015 through 2020.”

“Our goal remains to secure an industry-leading contract for our membership by the end of this year. Nevertheless, we’re prepared for all possibilities, including the chance that negotiations may be unnecessarily delayed due to United’s strategic use of the laws that govern labor relations in the airline industry,” he continued.

Before the negotiations begin, Klemm said that union negotiators will canvas front-line union members for input.

“The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with United Airlines,” he said, adding that high levels of participation will strengthen the union’s hand at the bargaining table.

“By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations,” Klemm said.

 

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Machinist Union Members at United Begin Preparations for New Contract Talks

15 March 2024

Union members at United Airlines, including nearly 29,000 workers over seven different workgroups, are preparing to start contract negotiations as soon as this summer, according to an announcement made on Friday by the Union’s District President, Mike Klemm.

According to Klemm, the seven agreements between the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and United Airlines will become eligible for updates on May 1. Thanks to an early start provision in the 2023 agreements, this will be the second round of contract talks between the union and the carrier in as many years.

In 2023, the Machinists Union negotiated industry-leading wages and job protections, with thousands of union members earning more than $37 an hour. They also extended critical job protections for hundreds of employees at airports where United had a smaller footprint, who might have otherwise faced the possibility of being outsourced. The 2023 agreements also insourced several stations, including Miami and Colorado Springs.

In 2023, the Airline committed to “Expedited Negotations,” which would have focused on only the top concerns of union members. The hope was that the talks would bring meaningful job improvements to covered workers quickly, within a few months. However, the Airline proved unable to fulfill that commitment, and talks stalled.

Under the Railway Labor Act, the governing body that oversees labor relations in transportation industries, including airlines, the failure of United to quickly seal a deal with the union meant that the two parties would enter into “Section 6” negotiations instead. Section 6 Negotiations, named after Section 6 of the Railway Labor Act, will require the parties to litigate every aspect of the collective bargaining agreements and are likely to take as long as a year or more to negotiate.

President Klemm warned that the track record of United Airlines’ inability to swiftly cement collective Bargaining Agreements might result in delays in the new round of negotiations.

“It’s essential to recognize the changing dynamics at United Airlines,” he said in a written statement to union members. “This is not the same airline as it was from 2015 through 2020.”

“Our goal remains to secure an industry-leading contract for our membership by the end of this year. Nevertheless, we’re prepared for all possibilities, including the chance that negotiations may be unnecessarily delayed due to United’s strategic use of the laws that govern labor relations in the airline industry,” he continued.

Before the negotiations begin, Klemm said that union negotiators will canvas front-line union members for input.

“The feedback we get from these surveys will be vital to your Negotiating Committee as we prepare to begin talks with United Airlines,” he said, adding that high levels of participation will strengthen the union’s hand at the bargaining table.

“By participating, you’re not just sharing your views; you’re actively contributing to the strength and direction of our negotiations,” Klemm said.

 

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Machinists Union Stands in Solidarity with Flight Attendants in Nationwide Day of Action

Machinists Union Stands in Solidarity with Flight Attendants in Nationwide Day of Action

Machinists Union Stands in Solidarity with Flight Attendants in Nationwide Day of Action

Pictured: Assistant General Chairs Erik Stenberg (left) and Mike Cyscon.

Machinists Union Stands in Solidarity with Flight Attendants in Nationwide Day of Action

IAM141.org

In a display of solidarity, members of the Machinists Union joined flight attendants in nationwide rallies held at over 30 major airports across the United States on Tuesday. The collective action, organized as part of the Worldwide Flight Attendant Day of Action, aimed to bring attention to the ongoing labor negotiations affecting over two-thirds of flight attendants at several major airlines.

Flight attendants from United Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Alaska Airlines, Air Wisconsin, American Airlines, Omni, and Frontier, represented by three different labor unions, took to the picket lines in cities including New York City, Orlando, Miami, San Francisco, Charlotte, Washington DC, Dallas, Atlanta, Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and more.

The protests underscored the pressing issues at hand as flight attendants push for fair and just contracts amidst negotiations with their respective airlines. In total, the unions participating in the day of action represent more than 100,000 flight attendants at all major airlines in the United States.

“Our time is now!” declared AFA Alaska President Jeffrey Peterson. “Alaska Flight Attendants today backed up our fight for an industry-leading contract with a 99.48% strike vote. And we’re out on the picket line demonstrating that we’re ready to do whatever it takes to get the contract we deserve. There’s no excuse: Alaska management has the money to buy another airline, they certainly have the money to invest in Flight Attendants. We have a simple message for management: Pay us, or CHAOS!”

Flight attendants at Alaska Airlines, represented by the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA-CWA), voted overwhelmingly in favor of a strike authorization should management fail to agree to significant improvements. The last time Alaska Airlines Flight Attendants went on strike was in 1993, when Flight Attendants took over the schedule using AFA’s trademarked strike strategy, Creating Havoc Around Our System™ or CHAOS™.

“Alaska Flight Attendants are fired up and ready to go,” emphasized AFA International President Sara Nelson. “You can’t fly without Flight Attendants. If Alaska management doesn’t remember what happens when you disrespect Flight Attendants, we are ready to show them. It’s past time for a fair deal.”

“We are not a line item on a balance sheet,” stated Melinda Beal, president of the AFA Cleveland chapter, as reported by Axios. She highlighted the challenges faced by flight attendants, including longer hours with little rest between shifts, eroding wages due to inflation, and airlines reaping billions in profits. Beal emphasized the demand for raises and the challenge to the pay structure.

The demonstrations are not strikes, though that’s the next step. The industry norm is that attendants don’t get paid until the plane doors close. Union members are calling for full pay for their work during boarding or deplaning and for time on the ground between back-to-back flights. In 2022, Delta Air Lines became the first U.S. airline to pay flight attendants during boarding, but at only half their standard rate.

 

 

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Stay up to date with all the latest news and information from the District 141 of the Machinists Union

Machinists Union Stands in Solidarity with Flight Attendants in Nationwide Day of Action

February 14 2024

Pictured: Assistant General Chairs Erik Stenberg (left) and Mike Cyscon.

In a display of solidarity, members of the Machinists Union joined flight attendants in nationwide rallies held at over 30 major airports across the United States on Tuesday. The collective action, organized as part of the Worldwide Flight Attendant Day of Action, aimed to bring attention to the ongoing labor negotiations affecting over two-thirds of flight attendants at several major airlines.

Flight attendants from United Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Alaska Airlines, Air Wisconsin, American Airlines, Omni, and Frontier, represented by three different labor unions, took to the picket lines in cities including New York City, Orlando, Miami, San Francisco, Charlotte, Washington DC, Dallas, Atlanta, Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and more.

The protests underscored the pressing issues at hand as flight attendants push for fair and just contracts amidst negotiations with their respective airlines. In total, the unions participating in the day of action represent more than 100,000 flight attendants at all major airlines in the United States.

“Our time is now!” declared AFA Alaska President Jeffrey Peterson. “Alaska Flight Attendants today backed up our fight for an industry-leading contract with a 99.48% strike vote. And we’re out on the picket line demonstrating that we’re ready to do whatever it takes to get the contract we deserve. There’s no excuse: Alaska management has the money to buy another airline, they certainly have the money to invest in Flight Attendants. We have a simple message for management: Pay us, or CHAOS!”

Flight attendants at Alaska Airlines, represented by the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA-CWA), voted overwhelmingly in favor of a strike authorization should management fail to agree to significant improvements. The last time Alaska Airlines Flight Attendants went on strike was in 1993, when Flight Attendants took over the schedule using AFA’s trademarked strike strategy, Creating Havoc Around Our System™ or CHAOS™.

“Alaska Flight Attendants are fired up and ready to go,” emphasized AFA International President Sara Nelson. “You can’t fly without Flight Attendants. If Alaska management doesn’t remember what happens when you disrespect Flight Attendants, we are ready to show them. It’s past time for a fair deal.”

“We are not a line item on a balance sheet,” stated Melinda Beal, president of the AFA Cleveland chapter, as reported by Axios. She highlighted the challenges faced by flight attendants, including longer hours with little rest between shifts, eroding wages due to inflation, and airlines reaping billions in profits. Beal emphasized the demand for raises and the challenge to the pay structure.

The demonstrations are not strikes, though that’s the next step. The industry norm is that attendants don’t get paid until the plane doors close. Union members are calling for full pay for their work during boarding or deplaning and for time on the ground between back-to-back flights. In 2022, Delta Air Lines became the first U.S. airline to pay flight attendants during boarding, but at only half their standard rate.

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Bryan,

Bryan Hutchinson, M.S.