Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

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Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

 

November 9, 2021 

Aloha Sisters and Brothers of Hawaiian Airlines,

When we last communicated with you, we informed you that your joint District Lodge 141 and 142 negotiation committee had made some progress in reaching a possible Tentative Agreement. Still, we could not agree on issues involving Health Insurance, the contracting out of covered work, job security, wages, and other benefits. Both sides have agreed to meet the week of November 14th in an attempt to bring our sisters and brothers the Tentative Agreement that recognizes and honors the hard work each one of you does, especially through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Our goal is to prevent the need to enter Section Six negotiations which would start this process over. As soon as the talks conclude next week, we will provide you with an update on where we stand. 

We thank you for your patience and support in obtaining the contract you have earned and deserve. 

In Solidarity,

District 141

Shannon Robello
Stacey Williams
Meki Pei
Sione Olevao
Arthur Croker
Joy Himuro
Ku’ulei McGuire

Michael G. Klemm

President and Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141

District 142

Derek Morton
Robert Hetchman
David Calistro
David Figueira

David Supplee

President and Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.

Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

Hawaiian Airlines Negotiation Update

Your Joint District 141 and 142 negotiation committee met with the company on August 30 – September 1 in San Francisco. Although some progress was made and we were able to resolve some issues on both sides of the table, no agreement was reached during this session on a new contract. We were not able to come to terms on issues involving Health insurance, Contracting out covered work, Job Security, Wages and other Benefits. As of the end of the session on Wednesday, September 1, no future meeting dates have been scheduled between us at this time. We will await a response from the company and anticipate scheduling another session in the very near future. Both sides remain committed to trying to resolve these open issues and are working to put forth a new agreement acceptable for our members. We will provide necessary updates as they happen to keep all of you in touch with this process.

We thank you for your patience and remind all of you to please practice safety protocols during this Covid pandemic,  to keep not only yourself safe but your family,  friends, and co-workers as well. 

In solidarity,

District 141

Arthur Croker
Shannon Robello
Stacey Williams
Meki Pei
Sione Olevao
Ku’ulei McGuire
Joy Himuro

 

 

District 142

Derek Morton
Robert Hetchman
David Calistro
David Figueira

Mike Klemm

President and Directing General Chair, District 141, International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

Dave Supplee

President and Directing General Chair, District 142, International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers
Please print and post on all IAMAW Bulletin Boards.

Hawaiian Airlines Will Require Employee Vaccinations for COVID-19

Hawaiian Airlines Will Require Employee Vaccinations for COVID-19

Hawaiian Airlines Will Require Employee Vaccinations for COVID-19

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Last week, Hawaiian Airlines announced plans to require all US-based employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The new policy will make Hawaiian the fourth airline to issue a vaccine requirement for employees. Delta issued vaccine mandates for new hires this spring. United and Frontier made similar policy changes in early August.

“As of November 1, 2021, Hawaiian Airlines will require all of our U.S.-based employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19,” the airline said in a memo to employees. The airline presented the policy partly as a safety measure and necessary to coordinate with pandemic-related restrictions in other countries.

“There is no greater demonstration of our values than ensuring the safety of others,” the memo read. “Safety is the foundation of air travel, and it is ingrained throughout our operation and service. This is no different. By getting vaccinated, we protect ourselves and those around us. That is malama.”

The list of major companies requiring vaccines includes executives at Walmart – as well as workers at companies such as Google, Facebook, Tyson Foods, Disney, and others. Members of the armed forces are also required to undergo immunizations. Fox Corporation is strongly encouraging executives and talent at the company to get vaccinated, using a voluntary self-reporting system.

Hawaiian Airlines CEO Peter Ingram told workers they had until November 1 to be fully vaccinated. This timeframe means that employees getting a two-shot vaccine will need to get the first dose in the next two months. United set a deadline for its 67,000 employees of five weeks after the FDA grants full use authorization to have at least one vaccine, or October 25, whichever date is sooner. Frontier will require vaccinations by October 1 or employees will need to undergo regular testing. Frontier has a ‘soft’ vaccine requirement, granting exemptions to virtually anyone that requests one.

All airlines have had vaccine mandates for some employees for years, dating back to long before the pandemic. Pilots and flight attendants who travel to regions where certain diseases are prevalent, for example, must get vaccinated. 

Delta has mandated vaccinations for new hires, meaning anyone leaving Hawaiian, Frontier, or United for Delta will need to prove vaccination status.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (District 141), which represents ground crews at Hawaiian, has supported incentive programs for airlines trying to immunize their workforces. These efforts have encouraged airlines to offer on-site clinics, time off from work, extra pay, and more. However, the union’s District President Mike Klemm has voiced concern that similar requirements happening at United Airlines are going out without proper communication with workers, leading to a clumsy and ineffective vaccination policy overall. He stressed that Hawaiian has been much more professional than United and that Hawaiian managers are actively trying to partner with employees, and are largely avoiding the widespread backlash occurring at United.

“Hawaiian has been courteous and careful with their communications with the union,” he said. “That shows a lot of respect. And, that kind of partnership will go a long way towards encouraging more vaccine participation.”

Federal agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and courts have repeatedly found that requiring employee vaccinations is a power companies have. Earlier in 2020, the IAMAW consulted with attorneys and legal experts who determined that companies that choose to require employee vaccinations are legally able to do so. 

It is not yet clear how the decision by airlines to require vaccinations will impact their business liability insurance costs, or whether or not such concerns are influencing their decision-making. 

Those eligible for an exemption will have to get frequent COVID-19 tests and wear masks, among other safety procedures.

 

Recent Articles

Airline Business Weaker Due to Delta Variant

Airline Business Weaker Due to Delta Variant

Airline Business Weaker Due to Delta Variant

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While summer traffic has been promising, there are troubling signs that the profit season for airlines may have peaked early – due to the continuing Pandemic.

TSA bookings year over year show positive growth throughout commercial aviation. Compared to 2019, the year before the pandemic began to ravage airlines, today’s air traffic is 80% of what it historically should be for August. 

However, it may be too early to declare the pandemic behind us. With the Delta variant clogging hospitals with unvaccinated Americans, airline travel is showing severe signs of weakening. For the third straight week, airline bookings are down and far weaker than in 2019. System bookings are currently 53.8% lower than 2019 levels. That could show that the most profitable quarter for airlines may be shorter this year than the historical average. If the trend continues, many airlines will not have enough summer profits to get them through the rest of 2021 as they might have wanted. 

The cause of the general malaise within airlines can be attributed to the continued COVID-19 pandemic. 

Lucrative business and international travel is down at all airlines and show few signs of a quick comeback. Popular destinations for American air travelers, including France, remain on the CDC’s “Do Not Travel” list. Hawaii is restarting restrictions on travel to the islands, including group sizes. Several other resort destinations are asking visitors to leave as soon as possible, while others extend border closures. All of which are challenges that airlines do not need right now. 

Southwest attributed a general slowdown “close-in reservations” for August to the Delta Variant in an SEC filing last week. Delta, Hawaiian, Air Canada, United, and Frontier have imposed some vaccine requirements for employees. 

recent study of air travelers conducted by Longwoods International is not helping relieve fears of long-term, pandemic-related slowdowns for air travel. According to the research, a shocking 67% of communities want to shut their doors to tourists and their money. This number is high and growing; two months ago, it was at 47%, an already incomprehensibly high figure for areas dependent on tourist revenue. The study also found other indicators that COVID-19 concerns are a serious threat to aviation. 

30% of respondents reported that they would rather drive instead of fly to their next travel destination, with 25% choosing domestic rather than international travel. The number that said COVID-19 concerns would “greatly” impact their travel decisions over the next six months was a staggering 34%. 

If all these indications of weakening air travel demand are accurate, airlines may have hit the high point of their profit season. 

Recent Articles

Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

Hawaiian Airlines Negotiations Update

Aloha Sisters and Brothers of Hawaiian Airlines,

A couple of weeks ago, we informed you that we would advise you of any new developments with Hawaiian Airlines and the scheduling of negotiations. Last night we confirmed with the carrier that we will meet the week of August 29th in San Francisco, California. We, along with your negotiating teams, remain cautiously optimistic that we can reach a tentative agreement during that session that will recognize and honor the work you do and the value you deliver to this company. 

Together, we can secure an outstanding contract on your behalf and avoid the need to enter into Section Six negotiations.

On a separate note, Hawaiian Airlines has informed us that they plan to follow United Airlines and mandate the vaccine for their employees. Although morally we don’t agree with a mandates-only approach to the Covid-19 vaccine, our attorneys have advised us the carriers are within their legal right to mandate the vaccine. 

Employees with specific disabilities and sincerely held religious beliefs may have additional legal rights that employers must respect. The EEOC can offer further guidance and legal assistance. 

 

We continue to thank you for your support and solidarity.

 

Mike Klemm

President and Directing General Chair, District 141, International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

Dave Supplee

President and Directing General Chair, District 142, International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.

 

141 Report: Interview with Mike Klemm, PDGC of District 141

141 Report: Interview with Mike Klemm, PDGC of District 141

Dave Lehive gets District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm on record with updates and news on negotiations, COVID recovery and vaccinations, and other hot topics. This 141 Report is a must-see! 

141 Report: Interview with Mike Klemm, PDGC of District 141

Dave Lehive gets District 141 President and Directing General Chair Mike Klemm on record with updates and news on negotiations, COVID recovery and vaccinations, and other hot topics. This 141 Report is a must-see! 

We begin with Mike telling his story about how he “grew up” at JFK Airport in New York City and first became a Shop Steward at Local Lodge 1322 in 1999. He was elected Grievance Committee Representative two years later, and in 2006 won election as Committee Chair for JFK and LGA. He was later elected Assistant General Chair of District 141, becoming President and Directing General Chair in 2015. 

The conversation goes right into contract negotiations, beginning with the successful joint collective bargaining agreement signed with American Airlines 18 months ago. That agreement raised the bar for wages, benefits, and work rules for the entire airline industry, earning the highest rate of approval for ratification of any contract in the history of District 141. 

Assistant General Chair Tony Gibson is leading negotiations with Spirit Airlines, seeking improvements to the first contract reached with that carrier. The process is expected to continue through the fall. 

We move on to Hawaiian Airlines, where ongoing expedited negotiations are modeled after the successful process that was used with United Airlines in 2016. Delays due to COVID restrictions have slowed down the process, and both sides differ on key issues, such as wages, benefits, job protections, and scope. Mike is looking forward to a quick resolution at the next scheduled meeting in the next 4 to 6 weeks. If an agreement is not reached, the union will end expedited negotiations and will proceed to negotiations per Section 6 of the Railway Labor Act, which sets the legal framework for collective bargaining in the airline industry. 

United Airlines presents the biggest challenge to successful negotiations because of the airline’s business model, which relies heavily on business and international travel – two areas that have been the slowest to see a post-COVID recovery. United is still operating fewer flights and offering lower fares than in 2019, although executives predicted a return to profitability in the third and fourth quarters of 2021. These factors, along with the new executive leadership at the airline, require a careful assessment of conditions before jumping into a full negotiations process. The negotiations were paused in 2020 due to COVID restrictions, and to dedicate resources to protecting jobs and scope during the pandemic. 

Mike reminds us that United enjoyed the highest profits in its history before the pandemic thanks to the hard work and dedication of Machinists Union members. District 141 plans to survey members before deciding if expedited negotiations are still the best alternative to reach an industry-leading contract that rewards that hard work. Negotiators will evaluate how many issues need to be addressed to have a more defined agenda before a planned meeting with United negotiators in the fall. 

Klemm also comments on United’s policy announced today that will require all US-based employees to be fully vaccinated against COVID by October 25, 2021. As an incentive, the company is offering a paid day off for employees who upload vaccination records to the United intranet before September 20, 2021. 

Today’s announcement reverses Kirby’s statement he made in January of this year when he said, “I don’t think United will get away with and can realistically be the only company that requires vaccines and makes them mandatory. We need some others…to show leadership, particularly in the healthcare industry.” District 141 stands by the position shared with members at that time, encouraging incentives, not mandates. “We expected better collaboration between United’s executives and the airline’s unions on this critical issue. Clearly, we are working with a different regime, the Oscar Muñoz style of management is over,” said Klemm.

In related news, contract negotiations with Flagship Facility Services in SFO progressed quickly under the leadership of AGC Troy Rivera and members there ratified a contract in June. 

Brother Mike Klemm leads the largest district in the IAMAW, which has doubled its membership numbers since 2008, when most of the executive board members took office. Yet, the leadership is focused on the needs of every member and returns every call and answers every email. The efforts of district officers to date have saved the jobs of 29 members who were wrongly terminated in 2021, with 1,200 jobs saved since 2008. They have also won over $190,000 in bypass and back pay in 2021, and close to $3 million since 2008. 

Dave and Mike describe how every department in the District serves an important function for members, from Safety to Education, Legislative and MNPL, Community Service, and EAP.

During Klemm’s tenure, he has led a team that has implemented the GSAP safety program at American, has made member education available to all locals, has increased fundraising to support our allies in elected office, and is currently expanding community service programs so they serve the needs of the communities where our members live. The Employee Assistance Program serves members facing many mental health issues besides alcohol and drug abuse that have become more prevalent during the pandemic. And the Communications team keeps everyone informed because an informed union member is a powerful union member. 

Finally, Mike and Dave speak about the importance of organizing and how it relates to everything District 141 does. Non-union carriers like jetBlue and Delta spend millions every year to keep out unions because they know we will negotiate a seat at the table, respect, and a better quality of life for workers. When we negotiate contracts, they set a higher standard for non-union workers as well. 

“Could you imagine how powerful we would be if everybody in the airline industry was in a union?” asks Mike, in a call to action. 

There’s no time to waste, we have work to do. 

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