JetBlue Union Organizing Effort Heats Up

JetBlue Union Organizing Effort Heats Up

Tristan “Lion” Dutchin (center, light brown shirt) was instrumental in the historic campaign to bring union rights to the Amazon Staten Island Facility, the first such victory in the history of the trillion-dollar company.. He is lending his insights and support to JetBlue Ground Operations Crew members currently organizing with the Machinists Union!
Tristan is shown here with GVP Richard Johnsen (center, blue shirt) District 141 President Mike Klemm (center, dark shirt), and a team of Machinist Union Organizers. Photos: Brian Vega, IAMAW 141 Communications Coordinator

JetBlue Union Organizing Heats Up in Wake of Historic Union Victories

Organizing
8 July 2022

A recent spate of high-profile union victories is inspiring union organizers at JetBlue, according to Ground Operations Crewmembers, at an appreciation rally this week at JFK airport in New York.

The event was hosted by the Machinists Union, which Ground Crews at JetBlue are seeking to join. The Machinists include ground and gate agents, flight crews, and other air transport workers at every airline and large airport in the country. 

Headlining the rally was Tristan “Lion” Dutchin, one of the lead organizers at Amazon’s Staten Island facility that became the first property at the trillion-dollar corporation to unionize. 

“I wanted to come out and show support for what Ground Ops are trying to do,” said Dutchin. “It’s not easy. Really, organizing with a union is impossible until suddenly it’s not,” he said. “There’s a lot a company like JetBlue or Apple or Amazon can do to mess you up,” he continued. 

As one of the lead organizers at Amazon, Dutchin saw firsthand how far companies are willing to go to stop a union drive. “They hired people to go work and pose as real employees,” he said. “When really their only job was to spy on us and badmouth unions,” he explained. “That fooled a lot of us for a while until we caught on to what they were doing.”

A central union-busting talking point at Amazon was to portray unions as “outsiders” and “third parties,” an argument that Dutchin laughed off. “I’m a third party now just because I joined a union?” He asked mockingly. “Ain’t no third parties. Sometimes they act like they don’t even know what a union is,” he said of Amazon’s anti-union efforts.

The union that Dutchin helped found, the Amazon Labor Union (ALU), is aggressively building itself up, growing, and educating its membership about union activism. An essential part of that effort includes outreach to other labor groups and participating in high-profile union drives like the ongoing campaign at JetBlue.

Richard Johnsen, General Vice President of the Machinists’ newly formed Air Transport Territory, expressed optimism that the Machinists and the ALU could forge a strong alliance. “We are more than just unions,” said Johnsen. “We’re also part of a movement. People are tired of sitting on the sidelines. They want to act, they want to make changes. That’s why this campaign at JetBlue is so exciting; it’s a vital part of a larger movement to prove that working people deserve just as much respect as managers and executives.”

Johnsen also pledged to work closely with the ALU, including hammering out a potential agreement to open the renowned Winpisinger Education Center to ALU members. “The Winpisinger Center is the largest labor school in North America,” he said. “It has an expert teaching staff that holds classes on things that matter to unions. Things like contract negotiations, leadership training, arbitration, organizing and more. It’ll be a great asset to JetBlue Crewmembers once they come on board, and I hope that ALU members will look into the opportunity to find out more about the Winpisinger Center.”

Machinists held the rally to showcase union organizing at the airline and recognize Ground crews currently working towards joining the Machinists Union. According to event organizers, the demonstration drew about a hundred JetBlue Crewmembers, many of whom participated in a raffle, were served an assortment of food items, and signed union authorization cards. Union authorization cards are critical to earning union rights at the workplace. More than half of employees must sign a card petitioning the federal government to recognize a union vote. Once a vote is scheduled, employees will then get a chance to formally join a union.

While JetBlue has thus far managed to avoid a union vote among Ground Crewmembers, Machinists Union organizers say that the campaign is getting very close to reaching its target of “50% +1” for card signing.

“We are very close,” said Machinists Union District President Mike Klemm. “The mood has changed. The rate of card signing is way up. People are asking questions, and we’ll be here to give our Ground Operations Crewmembers all the resources they need,” Klemm said.

“Importantly,” he continued, “we have the best union organizers in the nation working on this from our end. They’re working side by side with Crewmembers at JetBlue, who are organizing on the inside. Altogether, I am incredibly proud of this team. I know we’re going to get this done,” he said.

Watch as Apple Workers Make History with the Machinists Union

Watch as Apple Workers Make History With the Machinists and Aerospace UnioniMail23 May 2022Find out why Apple Workers in Maryland are Organizing with the Machinists Union.The Apple Coalition of Organized Retail Employees (CORE), a group of Apple retail employees in...

JetBlue Launches Hostile Takeover Bid for Spirit

JetBlue is Launching a Hostile Takeover of Spirit Justice at JetBlue21 April 2022Earlier this month, Spirit Airlines rejected an offer by JetBlue to purchase the airline in a $33 per share, all-cash bid, preferring a merger with Frontier instead. On Monday, JetBlue...

Lufthansa Workers in Puerto Rico Vote to Join the Machinists Union

Lufthansa Technik Workers in Puerto Rico Vote to Join the Machinists UnionGoIAM.orgOrganizingWASHINGTON, May 5, 2022 –More than 200 mechanics and related who work in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, at Lufthansa Technik, Puerto Rico, LLC. voted to join the International...

This May Day, Say You’re #Union Yes – and Support Organizing

This May Day, Say You're #UNION YESAFL-CIO1 May 2022All across the nation, workers are fed up and fired upSponsored by the AFL-CIO 2022 is turning out to be an incredible year as workers are voting to join unions and improve their lives. From baristas to warehouse...

Justice at JetBlue: Union Organizing is a Federal Right

UNIONIZING IS A FEDERAL RIGHT; NO NEED TO BE AFRAIDJustice at JetBlue28 April 2022The right to organize and join a union are fundamental employment rights under federal labor laws. JetBlue management is prohibited under federal law from ever knowing who signed an...

See the Full Gallery on Facebook >>

Related News

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

IAM141, United Airlines Contract Negotiations Break Down18 July 2022 IAM District 141 and United Airlines management met briefly last week in Chicago, IL, to review United management's "comprehensive" job security proposal. According to the Company, its proposal was...

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

ATTENTION All California CSR's: Important Information Re: MAP DevicesDistrict Lodge 141, along with Local Lodge 1782, addressed the MAP Device Protection Program. United attempted to implement a policy that seems to require that United Airlines' workers who have been...

Starbucks, Amazon Wins Inspire Organizing Everywhere

Starbucks, Amazon Wins Inspire Organizing Everywhere

Summer of Possibility: Starbucks and Amazon Wins Inspire Organizing at Trader Joe’s, REI, Target, and Apple

Labor Notes
5 July 2022
Written by Dan DiMaggio and Angela Bunay.

Baristas from across the country gathered at the Labor Notes Conference this month. As more stores begin to push for a first contract, Starbucks Workers United is ramping up for a summer of solidarity: “We’re gonna need the whole labor movement to come out,” says Casey Moore, a barista at a Starbucks in Buffalo, the city that was home to the union’s first victory last year. Photo: Jim West

This article first appeared on Labor Notes.org. 

“Seven months ago if you asked me about a union I would’ve said, ‘I don’t know, cops have them?’” says Sarah Pappin, a shift supervisor at a Seattle Starbucks. But on June 6, she and her co-workers voted unanimously to join Starbucks Workers United, part of an upsurge of organizing by younger workers with little union experience that is breathing new life into the labor movement.

Now they’re dreaming even bigger. “We want to not just open the door for the rest of the food service industry, we want to kick it down,” said Pappin, who’s worked full-time at Starbucks for eight years. “Eventually you get tired of jumping to the next job and praying it’s gonna be better. You realize you should just take a stand where you have some good ground.”

The union wave at Starbucks and the Amazon Labor Union (ALU) victory on Staten Island have sparked a new sense of possibility among workers at some of the country’s biggest nonunion employers, where unions have struggled for decades to establish any sort of foothold.

Since their April win, ALU organizers say they’ve heard from workers at another 100 Amazon facilities across the country who want to unionize. And in recent months workers have filed for union elections at Trader Joe’s stores in Massachusetts and Minneapolis, an REI in Manhattan, a Target in Virginia, and Apple stores in Atlanta and Towson, Maryland.

Workers in other largely non-union sectors are also organizing, with workers at an Activision Blizzard subsidiary forming the first union at a major video game company in May and tech workers at The New York Times becoming the largest bargaining unit in tech in March.

A CASCADING EFFECT

The organizing wave is turning the labor movement’s prevailing wisdom on its head. Until now unions have mostly avoided filing for election at single workplaces that are part of big chains, like fast food restaurants or Amazon warehouses, not seeing a viable route to a first contract.

But the worker-organizers behind the current upsurge have relied on grassroots organizing to produce a cascading effect.

“The most beautiful thing about this whole movement is that we only have to win one to show what’s possible,” says Casey Moore, a barista at a Starbucks in Buffalo, the city that was home to the union’s first victory last year.

After the December vote count, Moore said, “we just started getting flooded with emails and direct messages on social media saying ‘We’re so inspired, how can we do it here?’”

Boston barista Kylah Clay was among those inspired. “We started talking about our working conditions in this new light—that we can actually change them,” she said. Clay is now helping Starbucks workers throughout New England to organize.

As we went to press, the upstart union had won elections at 177 Starbucks stores in 30 states, and lost just 30; 98 more stores had filed for elections. Workers have also struck over issues ranging from leaky ceilings and malfunctioning grease traps to cuts in hours and retaliatory firings.

Starbucks baristas have a tight workplace culture that helps explain their success. Many of the workers are younger, queer, and work there in part for the gender-affirming health benefits. “We work shoulder to shoulder in very frustrating conditions,” says Pappin. “We already know what the power of working together is.”

 

DIRECTED FROM BELOW

The level of self-direction is a novel aspect of these recent campaigns. While Starbucks Workers United is getting advice and legal help from the SEIU affiliate Workers United, most of the organizing is being done by Starbucks workers. ALU is independent.

“What strikes me about what’s going on now is that it’s not being done by professional organizers,” says Labor Notes co-founder Kim Moody. “A lot of these campaigns are being initiated by the workers themselves, much as auto workers did in the 1930s.”

“It’s different from anything I’ve seen in the worker arena,” said Stephanie Luce, a professor at the CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies. “It feels like elements of what we saw around other upsurges of protest—the globalization moment, the Occupy moment, the George Floyd moment. What those had in common was that they were not directed from above.”

When ALU filed at the Staten Island warehouse with signatures from just 30 percent of the workforce—the bare minimum to get a union election—most labor organizers scoffed at their chances. The general rule is that you have to file with at least 60 percent support (and preferably more) to withstand management’s anti-union campaign.

But ALU shocked the world and won. “It caused me to rethink the old rules of organizing,” said Peter Olney, former organizing director for the Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU). “You start to think: what about the churn at Amazon? You’re never gonna get to 70 or 80 percent with the churn [the high rate of turnover –Eds]. If you have the organization to get to 30 percent, then you may have the organization to win an election.”

Olney said he’s now encouraging unions to take more seriously the idea of filing for election sooner: “Shouldn’t we be viewing this as a moment to engage in mass filings to stress management and their union-busters? Say you’ve been building out a committee, done actions, marched on the boss—couldn’t you win an election? And wouldn’t winning an election put you on the map?

“Yes, we’ll lose some, but if we were to win at an Amazon facility in Southern California, imagine the media and public reverberations of such a victory.”

WHY NOW?

Why is this uptick in organizing happening now, instead of 10 or 20 years ago? “It’s like Murder on the Orient Express—you can find at least 10 good suspects,” says Elaine Bernard of the Harvard Labor and Worklife Program.

The tight labor market is one. Another is the flat-out indignation of a generation that grew up in the Great Recession and has just watched its employers rack up record profits during a brutal pandemic.

 

Another factor is the recent movements that young people have participated in, from Black Lives Matter to LGBTQ rights to climate justice to the push for stricter gun laws in the wake of school shootings.

“Any of the rights campaigns have taught a lesson—that you have to stand up for yourself and you need your coworkers to stand with you, that nobody’s coming to rescue us, that the system is not just,” says Bernard.

“So many people who work at Starbucks were out on the streets for the Black Lives Matter uprising,” says Moore. “I think so many people have seen collective action happening outside the workplace and are saying, ‘Hey, we can do that inside the workplace too.”

“We grew up in this world that is literally on fire and there’s so many things that you can’t do anything about,” says Pappin, who just turned 31. “For me this was the first time in my life that I felt there was something wrong and I could actually take steps that would right them.”

Those sections of the labor movement that have kept the organizing flame alive also deserve credit, says Kate Bronfenbrenner of Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations; she named SEIU, UNITE HERE, and the Communications Workers in particular.

“We don’t have this moment because of politics,” she said. “It’s because of the Kellogg’s workers, the Mineworkers, all the workers that went out on strike. And frankly because U.S. employers were so outrageous during Covid and before.”

STILL A CHALLENGE

Moody urges workers to organize now, before an eventual recession makes things harder: “you’re not gonna get a much better time to do it.”

But even with comparatively favorable conditions, wins are far from guaranteed. At a second Staten Island Amazon facility, for instance, workers lost their vote in April.

The outcome of the March rerun election at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, is still hanging on hundreds of challenged ballots—though in the initial count, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union did much better than the vote last year, winning 875 yes votes against 993 no. That shows that even if you lose or make mistakes, “you can come back and do better,” says Bronfenbrenner. “You just have to do the work.”

RWDSU is asking the Labor Board to once again set the election aside for employer misconduct.

Workers at a Target store in Christiansburg, Virginia, recently pulled their election petition after the Labor Board said they hadn’t met the 30 percent threshold. As Target Workers Unite, an independent union, they’ve been organizing for years for Covid-19 safety protocols and against a racist, sexist manager.

The group is keeping at it despite the setback. “If we could just get one win at one store, I think that will be the catalyst for other stores,” said Adam Ryan, who has worked there for five years. “A lot of people are just waiting for a breakthrough.”

At an Apple store in Atlanta, workers who had filed with 70 percent support withdrew their petition, too, in the face of an anti-union campaign.

New York City Apple store workers say the company ramped up its anti-union campaign against their own organizing after the Atlanta store filed. Their advice: Don’t rush things. “When you’re in that stage of talking to your co-workers, make sure you take as much time as you need,” said a worker at the Grand Central Terminal store who asked to remain anonymous. “Everybody needs to be involved, and have everybody heard.”

On June 18, Apple workers in Towson, Maryland, became the first to successfully form a union at the company, voting 65 to 33 to join the Machinists. Kevin Gallagher, one of the Towson workers involved in the campaign, said that since their win he’s gotten direct messages on social media from dozens of other Apple employees interested in unionizing around the country.

PATH TO A CONTRACT

None of these upstart unions has won a contract yet. So we don’t know yet whether their gamble will pay off.

Workers at the outdoor equipment and clothing store REI in New York City are facing threats and retaliation from management since they voted 88 to 14 to unionize in March. “I’m anticipating REI will fight us every step of the way,” said Graham Gale, a technical specialist at the store.

Since ALU’s election win, Amazon has filed 25 challenges to the outcome and fired two of the organizers and several managers at the Staten Island warehouse. Similarly, Starbucks Workers United has accused the coffee chain of retaliating against organizing efforts by firing union leaders and cutting hours at numerous stores.

“I don’t think any of us is under the illusion that it’s going to be easy,” says Moore.

One challenge for Starbucks workers, Bronfenbrenner points out, is that they’ll have to negotiate with the company’s founder, Howard Schultz, who returned as CEO in April. In the 1930s auto workers organizing drives, Ford was a tougher nut to crack than General Motors because it was still run by Henry Ford. “It’s hard for Starbucks to settle because it’s [Schultz] giving up control over his baby,” Bronfenbrenner said. “It’s much more of a control issue.”

Still, “I sense that Starbucks is vulnerable—it’s hurting because of the organizing campaign, its investors are uncomfortable,” says Bronfenbrenner. “As long as the number of Starbucks stores keeps growing, then the union has power.

“There’s a tipping point where a certain number of stores are organized. The question is: what is that tipping point? At some point they’re going to have to bargain, is my feeling.”

SUMMER OF SOLIDARITY

Starbucks Workers United is ramping up for a summer of solidarity that includes spreading the organizing to more stores as well as deepening the community and labor support for the campaign.

“It’s gonna be all hands on deck,” said Moore. “We’re gonna need the whole labor movement to come out.”

Workers United announced it has created a $1 million strike fund.

“A lot of us are ready to do whatever it takes to put the pressure on,” Clay said. “I hope we’ve organized at least 1,000 stores by Labor Day.”

A version of this article appeared in Labor Notes #520. Don’t miss an issue, subscribe today.
Dan DiMaggio is assistant editor of Labor Notes.dan@labornotes.org

Angela Bunay is an intern at Labor Notes in summer 2022.angela@labornotes.org

Related News

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

IAM141, United Airlines Contract Negotiations Break Down18 July 2022 IAM District 141 and United Airlines management met briefly last week in Chicago, IL, to review United management's "comprehensive" job security proposal. According to the Company, its proposal was...

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

ATTENTION All California CSR's: Important Information Re: MAP DevicesDistrict Lodge 141, along with Local Lodge 1782, addressed the MAP Device Protection Program. United attempted to implement a policy that seems to require that United Airlines' workers who have been...

Happy Independence Day, Machinists

Happy Independence Day, Machinists

Happy Independence Day, Machinists

GoIAM.org
4 July 2022

Dear Sisters, Brothers, and Friends of the IAM,

Independence Day is the day Americans celebrate freedoms and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. While many Americans will enjoy a long weekend, a vacation, or other celebrations, millions more will be on the job.

Workers will be celebrating independence to live a free and democratic life this holiday. We split from other governments and fought for independence to enjoy the freedoms we have today.

Our country’s brave soldiers, police, firefighters, and first responders all come to mind, but let’s also remember the thousands of IAM members who assist our military in keeping us safe, and our members who make it possible to travel to see family and friends.

On this Fourth of July, let’s honor our brave heroes who fought for our nation’s independence, our military veterans who protected our freedom, and all the service men and women who continue to keep us safe.

As we celebrate our nation’s 246th birthday, let us all be grateful for our freedoms, those who made it possible, and those who continue to do so.

In solidarity,

Robert Martinez Jr.
IAM International President

Related News

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

IAM141, United Airlines Contract Negotiations Break Down18 July 2022 IAM District 141 and United Airlines management met briefly last week in Chicago, IL, to review United management's "comprehensive" job security proposal. According to the Company, its proposal was...

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

ATTENTION All California CSR's: Important Information Re: MAP DevicesDistrict Lodge 141, along with Local Lodge 1782, addressed the MAP Device Protection Program. United attempted to implement a policy that seems to require that United Airlines' workers who have been...

Guide Dogs of America – Tender Loving Canines Mark National PTSD Awareness Day

Guide Dogs of America – Tender Loving Canines Mark National PTSD Awareness Day

Guide Dogs of America – Tender Loving Canines Mark National PTSD Awareness Day

GoIAM.org
1 July 2022

Guide Dogs of America-Tender Loving Canines continues to advocate and serve Americans and service members in need. June 27 is National PTSD Awareness Day, to which GDA-TLC works to bring awareness to military veterans coping with PTSD.

With many IAM members serving in the armed forces, the Machinists Union will continue to be a driving force in securing assistance for veterans and their families. Tender Loving Canines and the PTSD Companion program is yet another way to support our service members when they return home.

WATCH: KTLA Story

Located in Sylmar, CA, the Guide Dogs of America-Tender Loving Canines training program costs the organization $60,000 to breed and train a PTSD Companion. Additionally, the program requires a 3-week online training program and a ten-day in-facility course to prepare veterans and their service companions.

To learn more about the program and how you can donate, help raise a puppy and advocate for veterans needing a PTSD companion, you can visit the Guide Dogs of America – Tender Loving Canines website here.

Related News

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

IAM141, United Airlines Contract Negotiations Break Down18 July 2022 IAM District 141 and United Airlines management met briefly last week in Chicago, IL, to review United management's "comprehensive" job security proposal. According to the Company, its proposal was...

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

ATTENTION All California CSR's: Important Information Re: MAP DevicesDistrict Lodge 141, along with Local Lodge 1782, addressed the MAP Device Protection Program. United attempted to implement a policy that seems to require that United Airlines' workers who have been...

New Machinists Union Report Analyzes State of the Aerospace Industry, Charts Future for Growth

New Machinists Union Report Analyzes State of the Aerospace Industry, Charts Future for Growth

New Machinists Union Report Analyzes State of the Aerospace Industry, Charts Future for Growth

GoIAM.org
29 June 2022

This week, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAMAW), North America’s largest aerospace labor union, released a new detailed report analyzing the state of the aerospace industry in the United States. The report calls for a national aerospace strategy created by the government, private industry, and labor unions to maintain its standing as a world leader in the high-tech and high-skilled aerospace industry.

The report, “Rising Potential: An IAMAW Proposal for a U.S. Aerospace Strategy,” comes two years after one of the worst periods for the aerospace industry. Machinists Union members were among many workers in the aerospace industry who experienced layoffs and furloughs because of COVID-19. While air travel dropped significantly during that period, so did the need for parts, repairs, modifications, and other services, hurting aerospace supply chain companies.

For decades, the IAMAW has been the largest union in the aerospace industry. IAM members in all sectors assemble civilian and military aircraft, build missiles and rockets, manufacture parts and components, and provide maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) services.

“Rising Potential: An IAMAW Proposal for a U.S. Aerospace Strategy” is a detailed report that provides an overview of the aerospace industry in the U.S., including international comparisons with some main competitors. It also outlines recommendations to address challenges and improve the nation’s foothold in the aerospace industry.

“The IAM has significantly contributed to making the aerospace industry dominant throughout the world,” said IAM Aerospace General Vice President Mark Blondin. “The contracts we have negotiated for our members continue to make this a sought-after career for many, especially our military veterans. Our members build the best products in the world, and it is only fitting that we help guide the national strategy for the aerospace industry. As one of the few core manufacturing sectors left not entirely ravaged by pro-corporate trade deals, it is of the utmost importance to preserve and expand the industry so it remains a reliable source of middle-class union jobs.”

“The IAM is proud of the research put into this report to help identify the aerospace and defense industry as a major economic engine for the American economy,” said IAM International President Robert Martinez Jr. “Our documentation helps cement our role as the working men and women who help make the industry thrive. For far too long, corporate executives and profiteers have monopolized our iconic industry, squeezing the public and weakening worker bargaining power. To maintain our standing in the world, we must provide the proper investment in the training of future aerospace workers. The IAM welcomes any partners who are willing to help achieve the goal of rebuilding our supply chains and creating jobs here at home.”

Key recommendations from “Rising Potential: An IAMAW Proposal for a U.S. Aerospace Strategy”:

  • Strengthen “Buy American” requirements to meaningfully ensure American tax dollars contribute to the American economy and preference union workers in the federal procurement process
  • Invest in training and registered apprenticeship programs 
  • Regulate offsets to protect our technological advantage, and prevent companies from agreeing to short-sighted deals with competitor nations 
  • Strengthen Rules of Origin to level the playing field and reduce the use of low-wage workers overseas, which undercut American workers 
  • Strengthen a fully functioning Ex-Im Bank to support domestic exporters
  • End the interstate race to the bottom that pits states and struggling localities against each other to offer ever-larger corporate subsidy packages
  • Increase federal funding for FAA Inspectors to promote the safety of the flying public
  • Encourage manufacturers to require FAA’s Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP)
  • Draft worker-focused trade policies that dissuade offshoring of U.S. aerospace jobs
  • Bolster public and private investment in Aerospace research and development 

 

Related News

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

United Airlines Negotiations Update: Contract Negotiations Break Down

IAM141, United Airlines Contract Negotiations Break Down18 July 2022 IAM District 141 and United Airlines management met briefly last week in Chicago, IL, to review United management's "comprehensive" job security proposal. According to the Company, its proposal was...

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

United CSRs in California: Important Information Re: MAP Devices

ATTENTION All California CSR's: Important Information Re: MAP DevicesDistrict Lodge 141, along with Local Lodge 1782, addressed the MAP Device Protection Program. United attempted to implement a policy that seems to require that United Airlines' workers who have been...

Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

Negotiations Limp Along as Self-Imposed August 1st Deadline Approaches

 

24 June 2022

This week, IAM District 141 and United Airlines management continued negotiations in Chicago, IL. We continue to be frustrated with the pace of the talks. We are doubtful we will reach the mutually agreed upon, self-imposed deadline of August 1, 2022, to reach tentative agreements for approximately 25,000 IAM-represented workers at United Airlines.

This week’s talks focused on the many facets of Article 2 Job Security and LOA 9, Article 4 Hours of Service, Article 9, Investigations, Grievances and Arbitration, and the vital quality of work/life issues of mandatory overtime and outage relief. While we did make some marginal progress, we still do not have agreement from United management that our job security and scope of work will be at the very least equal to what we have presently. This is very concerning at this stage of the expedited negotiations process.

In other news, this past Wednesday, IAM District 142 announced tentative agreements with Alaska Airlines on a two-year contract extension, which provides industry-leading pay rates that range between 9-17 percent. The tentative agreements cover over 5,000 IAM-represented ramp, customer service, stores, and office and clerical employees. The top-of-scale wage rate is $34 per hour, and the starting rate is $18.50.

Click here to view the Alaska COPS TA.

Click here to view the Alaska Ramp TA.

IAM-represented United Airlines workers in similar classifications earn approximately 10 percent above that of Alaska Airlines workers at the top of the scale. This is due to United being over five times the size of Alaska Airlines. This is welcome news for our contract talks as a rising tide lifts all boats, and United Airlines is poised to report record-breaking revenue generation for the second quarter of 2022.

Make no mistake; if United Airlines management believes it can stick its head in the sand regarding what is currently happening and what has already been negotiated at other carriers, it is sorely mistaken. Our only goal for IAM members at United Airlines is the best contract in the airline industry in all areas.  

Negotiations will continue July 13-15 and the week of July 25.

In solidarity,

Your District 141 Negotiating Committee

Olu Ajetomobi
Joe Bartz
Victor Hernandez
Barb Martin
Andrea’ Myers
Terry Stansbury

Faysal Silwany
Erik Stenberg
Sue Weisner

Michael G. Klemm

President & Directing General Chair,
IAMAW District 141
#LGR

Recording Secretaries: Please print and post on all IAMAW bulletin boards.